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Full text of "Southern Illinois Normal University. Information Service news release."

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PROPERTY OF 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 
UNIVERSITY 




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PROPERTY OF 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

UNIVE JTY 

LIBRARY 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 






Information Service ouio»m,n»ioit 

LOBENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■i 



1-27-47 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. -a trumpet trio and a vocal solo will 
provide the specialty numbers on the program which the 66-piece 
naroon Band of Southern Illinois Normal University will present 
Wednesday evening, Jan. 29, at S p. m. in Shryock Auditorium on the 
University campus. 

The band's director, Harold Hines, and two ST,udents--.;ida Cover 
of Centralia and Angele Leoni of Belleville--will play "The Tiiree 
Trumpeters" by G. Agestini, 

David mclntosh of Carbondale will serve as "commentator" for 
the concert, and will also sing a voc^l solo, ''Stout Hearted Len" 
by Si^mund Romberg," 

Tne concert will include oibeiius, bach and Brahms numbers as 
well as the well-known band marches and light opera selections. 

h. ion c ; the lighter sections of the program will be "Variations 
on the Theme 'Pop Gees the Weasel,'" arranged by Lucien Cailliet; 
"Rhythms of Rio" by David Bennett and "Deep Purple" by Peter De Rose. 

Opening with "The Star-3_ -angled Banner,"' the concert will close 
with the famous "His Honor March" by Henry Fillmore, 

The concert is open to the public. There will he no admission 
charje. 

i if'M 



SOUTHERN TLLINdfe 
UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■^^■B ^M^HHBH^HHH 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. -An all-star attraction has been lined 
up for local fans next Wednesday night by Athletic Director Glen "Abe" 
Martin. The feature of the evening will pit the Southern Illinois 
Normal varsity against the University of Chicago, the first meeting of 
these two schools on the hardwood in history. Since Chicago is .• ■;• 
probably the leading school in the fight for de-empaasizing athletics, 
fans will probably be interested in seeing the results of such an 
experiment. 

The records show that the Chicago Maroons have won only three 
games so far this season, but many of their losses could have been 
wins but for a very few points. 

The second attraction will faature the Southern "Reserves" against 
the Intra-mural "All-Stars". The reserves have lost but very few 
games this season, and will especially be pointing for this one. 
However, the "All-Stars" can boast of of a star-studded lineup. 

They will include former all-American Gene Stotlar of Pinckney- 
ville, './alter Eadie of West Frankfort, Bill Killspaugh of Norris City, 
Dick Foley of Carbondale, Paul Enrietta of W. Frankfort, Joe Stevens 
of Marion, Roy Ragsdale of DeSoto, Dick Harmon of Granite City, Bob 
Stotlar of Carbondale, Truman Hill of Benton, Vernon Vogt of Belleville, 
James James Olive of Zeigler, Joe Franza of Ilurphysboro, Bill Parrish 
of r»ianteno, Andy Hagopian of Granite City, Bill Ulrich of Pinckneyville, 
Bob Williams of Carmi, James Sexton of Gillespie, Gene Davidson of 
Harrisburg, and Simeon Pate of Bluford was selected as coach. 

The feature game will get under way at S:15 p.;';:., with the 
preliminary set for 6:45 p. in. This feature game will be broadcast 
over Station WJPF, with the play-by-play description being handled by 

Les Thrasher. 

Last Saturday night, the Maroon Varsity team strengthened their 
hold on first place in the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
by downing State formal 67-55 at Normal, 

Oliver Slioaff, junior from Mt. Carmel, was high point man as he 
tossed in 27 points, and center .uentin Stinson of bldorado accounted 
for 17 for the winners. 

Johnny Sebastian, senior forward from. Odin, contributed 13 points 
toward the Laroons cause, inaddition to a fine passing exhibition. 
Guards Gene Hall of Galatia and Bob Colborn, of Flora held Normal 
aces Dick Ealdrini and Frank Oliveri to 22 paints for both. 

son )IS 



1 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service ca»bp»pa«. uu»oii 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■^^■■■■■HBH^HBHB^H 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. -With no winning streak to worry about, 
the Southern Illinois Normal University karoon Care squad will take 
the floor Saturday, January 25, at #:15 p.m. against ths Northern 
Illinois Normal Huskies with the Illinois Intercolle 'ii.'hletic 
Conference lead at stake. 

a preliminary Lj ame between the Southern Reserves and the Herrin 
Supply Independents is scheduled for 7 o*m. The athletic department 
has announced that tickets will go on sale at 0:15 p.m. 

The Southerners, who are the loop crown defe .ders, will be 
meeting the cream of the crop so far as the conference is concerned 
when Northern takes the floor. Last Week, while Southern was downing 
Western and Eastern, the Huskies were taking the measure of Western 
and State Normal. 

The Maroons lost their last home game, the first loss of the 
season before local fans, as they were upset by I-iillikin. However, 
the five days of rest since then will undoubtably put then back into 
shape, and on top of that they will be out to vindicate this last 
loss, since Millikin was rated far below, the i-laroons. 

On deck for the Maroons will probably be Oliver Shoaff of Mt. 
Carmel and Johnny Sebastian of Odin at forward, Quentin otinson of 
Eldorado at center, and Bob Colborn of Flora and Gene Hall of Galatia 
at guard. 

Radio StatiDn WJPF, with headquarters in Herrin, has announced 
that they will carry' the play-by-play account of the game Saturday 
ni^ht, with Les Thrasher describing the action. This will mark the 
fifth game of the season to be broadcast by this station. 

irm 






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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDA1 - E - 1LUNO ' 5 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



-2- 

Leading Nazi war criminal have been tried and executed, with further 
trials now proceeding and others planned. In accordance with the 
Potsdam program, the United States proceeded rapidly with the removal 
of i\iazis from virtually all positions.'* 

"After using our own screening boards for a period, it was 
decided in March, 1946 to place the responsibility for dezification 
in German hands, under our supervision. By November, 1946, Lt-Gen. 
Clay felt impelled to reprimand the Germans severely for laxity in 
carrying out the program, so that the system is now on trial to see 
whether it will be continued. Presumably, the Germans have become 
more 'efficient 1 under General Clay's pressure. The whole task was 
eased considerably by the amnesty granted last December 24 to £00,000 
lesser 'offenders' in low-income brackets. There are still nearly two 
million 'offenders' to be dealt with'.' 

"The problems of re-education are exceedingly difficult, and they 
are complicated by the ^reat shorta ;es of school buildings, coal, 
books, paper, food, and teachers. But nevertheless nearly every child 
of school age is now in school, and young men are pouring into the 
German universities which are open. All Nazi teachers and textbooks 
are barred. It will require considerable American aid to put the 
German educational system back onits feet, so to speak, and to 
revitalize all the instruments of mass communication, as the press and 
radio. 1 ' 

"Our program for building a democratic government for Germany 
be w an on the local level. After several months of strict restraints, 
we authorized the formation of political parties, divided our zone 
into three German states, held elections for local officials, 
sponsored the writing of new democratic constitutions for the states 
and elections of state legislatures and administrators. We have 
recently promoted German administrative cooperation between the three 
states, and are in the laidst of building more cooperation between the 
British and American zones." 

.. u .. 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Release Thursday 

Carbondale, 111., Jan.- -A journey to Evansville is on the docket 
for the Southern 'Illinois Normal University ,? Junior Whiz Kids ; ' comes 
next Thursday night, January 16 to tangle in a return engagement with 
the Purple Aces of Evansville College. 

That the Maroons will nave troubles with the Hoosiers is a 
certainty, since the experts have said that it is worth ten points for 
the team to play on its home floor, and the ( 'Kids ;? beat the Aces by 
only 11 points when they met on the Southern hardwood last January 7. 

The Maroons four defeats so far have come on road trips, but a 
dual win over the Purple Aces could go a long way toward bolstering 
the Southern morale. 

The Maroons will have to cope with the sharp- shooting of - 
diminutive Joe Hafele, who thrextf fear into their hearts during the 
latter part of the game when he and Southerner Oliver Shoaff of Mt« 
Carmel matched long shots earlier in the season. 

■^uentin Stinson, Maroon center of Eldorado, will also have his 
hands full again with the 6'6 i! Ace center Andy Collnis who was held to 
eleven points by Stinson' s excellent work in the previous contest. 

The rest of Southern's lineup will probably be as follows: 
Johnny Sebastian, long 'shot specialist of Gain, in the other forward 
slot; Gene Hall, defensive wizard of Galatia, and Dob Colborn, star 
freshman from Flora at guard. 

The next home game for the Maroons will take place next Saturday 
when Coach Lynn Holder's charges entertain Eastern Illinois State 
Teachers in an Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic contest designed to 
fix a definite leader in the loop, as both teams are tied at present 
with one win and no losses. 

7 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■^^^^^^■^^■■■■I^^MM 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. -Coach Lynn Holder and his Southern 
Illinois IJormal University Maroons have their work cut out for them 
next Saturday January 19, at 3:15 p. m. , when they tackle the Eastern 
Illinois Panthers with the Illinois Intercollegiate athletic 
Conference lead hanging on the outcome. 

On the following Monday, the Maroons will step out of loop play 
to entertain the Big Blue of Millikin University. 

The Southern-Eastern tilt will be the big game of the week as 
both teams are rated as the best in the league. It is even impossible 
to draw a conclusion from previous games, since both squads met ariu 
defeated Washington University and Indiana State. 

The Maroons will probably depend on Oliver Shoaff of Kt. Carmel, 
Johnny Sebastian of Odin, Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, Gene Hall of 
Galatia, Bob Colborn of Flora, and johnny Ruzich to carry the main 
burden, while the Eastern squad is built around its star guard Elmo 
Hildebrand, who is capable of sinking buckets from any part of the 
court left unguarded. 

Both the Panthers and the Maroons have won one conference game arc! 
have dropped none. The Southerners dropped Western for their win, 
while State Normal fell victim to Eastern earlier in the season. 

Saturday's game should give a prevue of the I-dlliken tilt, since 
the Big Blue dropped a three point decision to Eastern. 

Tickets for the games will go on sale at 6:15 p.m. on game nights, 
still on a first-come first-served basis, the athletic department has 
announced, with preliminary tilts starting at 7 p.m. 

Fans who wish to see the Maroons in action are urged to come out, 
since the cagers have only three more home games left after the two 
above contests. The reason for this odd schedule is that many of 
large schools that Southern meets had to be worked in after their 
regular schedules were completed, athletic director Glenn "Abe" Martin 
announced. 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



1-6-47 

Carbondale, 111. Jan. -Illinois Intercollegiate nthletic 
conference play will begin next Saturday night, January 11, as the 
'•'Junior Whiz Kids" of Southern Illinois Normal University, defe-ndin& 
champs, entertain VJe stern Illinois State Teachers College in the 
Southerners 1 gym at o:15 pm. 

The croons now hold a season's record of seven wins against 
four defeats, having downed Chef^'ord Manufacturing, Onized Glass, 
Washington University, Arkansas State, Indiana State, Colorado Aggies, 
and Evansville College. They have been beaten by St. Louis University 
Western Kentucky, Loyola of hew Orleans, and Rockhurst of Kansas City. 

Their latest victory came at the expense of the Evanaville 
Purple Aces last Tuesday ni__,ht, when trie Maroons after leading by 
a few points the entire jame, managed to pull -way in the final 
minutes for a 52-41 victory. 

The approximately 1., £00 fans who jammed the gymnasium were U J. 
delighted by the lancy exhibition of passing that was displayed by the 
whole team, but especially by Oliver Shoaff of mt. Carmel, and 
Johnny Sebastian of Odin, 

Shoaff was hi^h-point man for the contest with IS points, 
while guentm Stinson, six-foot four-inch center from Eldorado, 
dropped in 12 tallies, in addition to effectively stopping the 
Evansville center, six-foot six-inch Andy Collins. 

The tickets for the Western ai'iair will _o on sale at 6 p.m. 
on a iirst -come first-served basis, ma the athletic department has 
announced that this will be an opportune time for local funs to see 
the team, a s many students _,o home on.tue weekend, thus leaving 
more seats available. 

The preliminary ame tatween the Southern and Western "B" 
teams will g it underway at 7p.m. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND,' ED. ^^^^■■^^^^^^■■I^^^^^^M 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. -Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference activity will begin Saturday, January 11, as the Southern 
Illinois Normal University "Junior Whiz Kids" play host to Western 
Illinois State Teachers in the Men's gymnasium at 8 V :15 p.m. 

The Southerners will also attcnp t to streach their mastery over 
tL* Leathernecks to eight games, as the Westerners haven't copped a 
contest since January 22, 1943. 

However, Coach Lynn Holder will have his Maroons at peak form 
for this game as the Leathernecks are sparked by Chuck Fowler, former 

tuber of the 1943 University of Illinois squad, and Bill Will, 1941 
letterman who is handicapped by a deformed right aria, who has scored 
.55" and 50 points respectively for the Westerners in the first six 
5a1r.es, 

Holder will probably shoot his same starting line up at the 
conference foes that has won seven g j.ies while dropping four this 
season. They are Oliver Shoaff of Mt. Carmel, Johnny Sebastian of Odin, 
: uentin Stinson of Eldorado, Gene Hall of Galatia, and Bob Colborn of 

Flora. 

« 

Southern, winners of the loop crown last season for the first time 
in history, will be t.l.e target of all opponents this season, not only 
because 01 the conference honors, but also because they won the 
Mational Intercollegiate crown last year. 

Tickets for this tilt will go on sale at 7 p. m. Saturday on a 
'•first-come first-served" basis, and with many of the students going 
home for the weekend, it has been suggested by the athletic department 
that this would be a good time for the local followers to come out to 
see the "Kids'" in action. 

A preliminary game has been set for 7 p. ra. 

§§#§' 



N 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^■■i^^^^^^^B^^^^B 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. -a two-day program of prectical advice 
for fruit growers of this region has been arranged for the 73rd annual 
meeting of the Southern Illinois Horticultural Society which convenes 
here at Southern Illinois Normal University Monday and Tuesday, ." 
Jan. 13. 

The session will get under way Monday at 10 a.m., with an 
address of welcome by Dr. Robert C. Cassell, chairman of the University 
agriculture department , which will be followed by the address of the 
society's president, William H. Beauman of Tunnel Hill, and the report 
of the secretary-treasurer, L. L. Golvis of Carbondale. 

Two University of Illinois horticulturists, R. L. McKunn and Dr. 
Dwight Powell, will speak on Monday morning's program, the former on 
"Variety Preferences in Southern Illinois, 5 '' the latter on "Controlling 
Brown Rot in Peaches," Dr. Powell will also report on "The 1947 Spray 
Schedule'' 1 on Tuesday afternoon. 

At the iionday afternoon session the following speakers will 
appear: Dr. H. W. Anderson, University of Illinois, on "Strawberry 
Rot. and T . k r hat To Do About It"; H. B. Hartline of Makanda, on "Power 
Machinery in Cleaning Up Orchard Sites 1 '; Jack Vernon, rtiagars Sprayer 
& Chemical Company, '""./hat's New in Orchard Equipment"; and S. C. 
Chandler, field entomologist for the State Natural History Survey and 
consulting entomologist for Soutnern Illinois Normal University, on 
"Controlling Catfacin_: and Other Peach Insect Problems." 

Banquet speaker Monday evening will be a. 0. Eckert of Belleville, 
who will present a talk, "My Impressions of South America," illustrated 
by colored movies. The University chorus, directed by Floyd V. 
T ;/akeland, associate professor of music, will sing. 

Motion pictures and discussion of Illinois peach package 
experiments during 1946 will occupy much of Tuesday morning's program. 
Chandler will report on "Mites, Leaf Rollers and Aphids on Apples" and 
C ?orge W. Bennett, also of the State Natural History Survey, will speak 
on "Stocking Fish Ponds." 

The concluding session Tuesday afternoon will feature a discussion 



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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^■■^^■■^^^^^■i^^^^BM 






Carbondale, 111.., Jan. -Twelve Southern Illinois Normal 
University students will go to Bloomington Friday to participate in a 
speech tournament involving six debates and three discussion contests, 
Dr. P. Merville Larson, chairman of the speech department, has announced 
announced. 

Dr. Larson will accompany the group, which will include Eileene 
Gardner of Granite City, Rosemary Uoolard of Carbondale, Lewis Hammack 
of Sparta, John Rendleman of Anna, Louis Brusetti of hurphysboro, Bob 
Eaton of Carbondale, Bill Kozyak of Granite City, Earl Rudesill of 
Fairfield, Ralph Lane of Eldorado, Charles Weber of Cairo, Dale Andrews 
of Kiti-.-Carrael, Ja&k -Walker of" Mt^ Vernon. 

Subject for debate at the Bloomington tournament will be, 
"Resolved: That Labor Should Have a Direct Share in the Management of 
Industry." The discussion contestants will argue on the subject, ''How 
Can Industrial Strife be Eliminated?" 

Dr. Thomas F. Barton professor ox w eography, at Southern will 
serve as a judge in the tournament. 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. -Southern Illinois Normal University •. 
will be host to the Southern Illinois Horticultural Society Monday and 
Tuesday, Jan. 13-14, when the society holds its 73rd annual meeting. 

Subjects up for discussion include brown rot in peaches, ' 
strawberry rot, fertilizing bearing orchards, use of power machinery 
in cleaning up orchard sites, peach packing experiments, and the 
supply situation and price outlook. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CABBONDALE - 1LLmois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^ ^ M ^^^^™ 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. -Appointment of Richard Kohler as 
instructor in industrial education at Southern Illinois Normal 
University, effective immediately, has been announced by the 
University President's Office. 

Mr. Kohler will teach both in University High School and in the 
College of Vocations and Professions. 

A graduate of Illinois State Normal University, Mr. Kohler holds 
the master of arts degree from the Colorado State College of Education. 
Before entering the Army Air Force, in which he served as a 
commissioned officer, he taught industrial arts at the Bloom 
Township High School, Chicago heights. 

~ii ii'ii % If 

* 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. -Indicative of the role Southern Illinois 
Normal University takes in community and civic affairs, eight 
University faculty members have been appointed to committee memberships 
for the Carbondale Business Ken's Association for 1947. 

These include: Agriculture and Industry Committee--University 
President Chester F. Lay; . Raymond Dey, Director of extension; Dr. 
Robert Cassell, professor of agriculture. 

i-lembership--Glenn !, Abe ,? Martin, athletic director; Airport--Dr t 
0. B. Young, professor of physics; Program and Entertainment--E. G. 
Lentz, professor of history and director of the Clint Clay Tilton 
Library; Tax Committee--Edward V. Miles, Jr., business manager; 
Grievance-- John I. Wright, associate professor of history. 

R. E. i-luckelroy, professor emeritus and former chairman of the 
agriculture department is also a member of the agriculture and in 
industry committee. 

,1 >i ifUif 

lOUTHERN - [NOB 
UN) ^vRY 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. -Eagle Plume--interpreter of Indian lore, 
humorist, philosopher and anthropoIogist--will appear in authentic 
costume before the student assembly at Southern Illinois Normal 
University here Thursday morning, Jan. 9, at 10 o'clock. 

Born in the West of a pioneer family that proudly boasts a strain 
of Indian blood, Eagle Plume is a well-informed student not only of the 
early history of the American Indian but of other racial groups as well. 

For three years during the war, he was an Army scout in the 
Southwest Pacific. 

He has lectured widely before college, high school and civic groups. 

His subject when he appears before Southern students will be 
"Indian Life, Lore, and Culture. i! 



i. n ii a a 



Carbondale, 111., Jan, -a Southern Illinois Normal University 
radio program has been entered in the George Foster Peabody Awards 
national competition conducted by the University of Georgia, University 
officials have been informed by Radio Station WJPF, Herrin. 

The program, ?, New Frontiers in Science, 1 ' was one of a series of 
round tables presented by the University last summer over Station WJPF« 
Participants on the program were Dr. T. VI. Abbott, professor of 
chemistry, Dr. W. M. Gcrsbacher, associate professor of zoology, and 
Dr. 0. B. Young, professor of physics. Master of ceremonies for the 
program was Robert D. Faner, associate professor of English. 

"Upon the suggestion of Mrs. G. C. Wiley, Regional Director of 
Listener Activity, National association of Broadcasters, and with 
feelings of pride in our mutual cooperation, we chose one ol' the 
programs we think was outstanding,*' Fred J. Reinhardt, WJPF station 
relations director, wrote the University Information Service. 



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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■^^^■■■^■■^^^■^^■M 



-2- 

by Dr. M. J. Dorsey, head of the horticulture department at the 
University of Illinois, on ''Peach Varieties, Earlier and Later than 
Elbertas, ,v and one by Fred P. Bierer of the Fruit Exchange Supply 
Company, on "Supply Situation and Price Outlook". 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. -A new series of forum discussions 
dealing with current international problems will be sponsored at 
Southern Illinois Normal University during the latter part of January 
and February by the Independent Student Union. 

The speakers include the following University faculty members: 
Jan. lo--Dr. Lewis A. Maverick, professor of economics, on "The 
Russian Imperialist Program. !v Elleanor White of Equality, student ....■'.:; 
chairman. 

Jan. 23--Dr. Frank Klingberg, associate professor of governiaent , 
on ,v The Denazification Program for Germany,*' Julius Swayne of Du.uoin, 
student chairman. 






Jan. 30--Joseph R. Baxter, instructor in Latin-American studies, 
on n '0ur Good Neighbor Policy," Catherine Sullivan of Harrisburg, 
student chairman. 

Feb. 6--Dr. Henry J. Rehn, professor of economics and dean of the 
College of Vocations and Professions, on '''Civil War in China," David 
Kenney of Carbondale, student chairman. 

Feb. 20--Dr. Orville Alexander, professor of government, on "The 
Outlook for the British Emprie, 1 ' Elmer Geittman of Metropolis, student 
chairman, 

Feb, 27--Dr. Willis G. Swart z, professor of government, "America's 
Role in Preserving the Peace," Jean Larson of Carbondale, student 
chairman. 

All lectures will be given at 6 p. m. in the Little Theater. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE ' 1LL1NO ' s 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ™ "^^^ 



Release Monday 1-11-47 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. 13 - Addition of 125 new faculty- 
members, making possible the opening of more than 20 new fields of 
instruction and expansion of almost every department is proposed at 
Southern Illinois Normal University if its new 4 l/2 million dollar 
proposed budget is authorized by the General Assembly. 

University President Chester F, Lay and Business Manager Edward 
V. Miles, Jr,, on Tuesday will "argue the case" for the new budget 
before the General Assembly's Budgetary Commission, now in session. 

The new $4,5l6,$30 proposed budget, which has been approved 
by the State Teachers College Board, would provide $913*322 for tjje 
addition of 23 full professors, 34 associate professors, 33 assistant 
'■pttoitessors , 13 instructors and 16 faculty assistants. 

Among these new appointees would be specialists who would 
develop training programs in such fields as anthropology, folklore, 
forestry, geology, photography, recreation, social service work, 
visual education, clinical psychology, art in laboratory schools, 
bacteriology, dairying, dietetics, farm management , finance, 
horticulture, institutional management, marketing, mineralogy and 
mine operation, philosophy, psychology, vocational drawing and 
vocational machine shop. 

Some work in many of these subjects has been available, but 
it is proposed to bring in at least one expert in each of these 
particular subjects, and in some cases several. 

Since the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the College 
of Vocations and Professions are Southern's newest branches, many 
of the new teaching positions will be in these colleges. 

The College of Education, however, is also slated for 
considerable expansion, with the proposed addition of 17 new staff 
members, including a full professor, an assbciate professor, an 
assistant professor and two faculty assistants in the department of 
education; an associate professor of high school English, an 



— - - - — 



-2- 

assistant professor of art in the laboratory schools, an assistant 
professor of high school agriculture, an assistant professor of 
high school commerce, an assistant professor of industrial education, 
a librarian in the campus laboratory schools, and six instructors in 
practice teaching in affiliated schools. 

Expansion is also contemplated for existing departments such as 
art, English, foreign language, journalism, economics, home economics, 
sociology, Latin-American Studies, and others. 

Research will come into new prominence under the new budget, if 
it is authorized, since it provides for a full-time specialist in 
anthropological research, a full-time specialist in botanical 
research, two additions to the Museum staff, and ten faculty 
fellowships for research in regional and other subjects, 

"It is our hope that Southern may become the center for the 
collection of and research on all materials pertaining to the 
history, culture and folklore, both recent and pre-historic, of 
this region; and to its mineral, geological, horticultural, and 
forest resources," President Lay explained today. 

Expansion of the University T s services to Southern Illinois 
are proposed, through the research activities mentioned above, and 
in other directions as well. With the addition of new faculty 
members, more extension classes will be provided off-campus, in new 
subjects and in new counties. 

A full-time director for the Film Service is proposed, to permit 
expansion of this agency for both on-campus and off-campus use of 
visual aids; a new Personnel Clinic would be established, and a 
specialist in remedial speech would be appointed. 

On-campus services would be expanded by the proposed appointment 
of a full-time head librarian, another University physician for the 
Health Service, and a full-time director of the physical plant. 

"If the General Assembly grants our request for the 1947-49 
biennium," President Lay said, "Carbondale and Southern Illinois 
generally will do their part, we know, and we shall be able to go 
forward rapidly in our long-range program of university-scale 
development." 

m 



, 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois "Dailies, 



January 17, 1947 
Carbondale, 111, Jan, -The three-way tie bhat exists in 
the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Bill be broken 
Saturday night whe; two of the leaders, Southern Illinois tformal 
University and Eastern Illinois State Teachers meet on the Carbondal« 
hardwood g Game time is set for 8:15 pm,, with the preliminary set-to 
getting under way at 7 pm* 

The "Junior VJhiz Kids" of Southern have a record of losing 
onl"^ one home game in two an ,J one-half seasons lo protect, in addition 
to their defence of the loop crown, which th'er won last year for 
the first time in history. 

Eastern, sparJced by lanky alio Hilcebrand, plays the same fast- 



break tyoe h 



~) "I •"*-. ~ +• 1 



o. -L -i- 



w.r r :cco:.,e 37"nonomous with the * "r.roons, ' and 



a race-horse contest is expected. 

On "onday, the Southerners will play host to the ; '?i; Blue of 
rillikin from Decatur, Eastern won from "miHikin by three points 
last week, thus giving fans a chance to see how -the Maroon- Big Blue 
r ame will stack up after Eastern meets the Southerners, 

The haroons took the season's series i rom Tvansville College 
last Thursday on the Indiana floor ' y dropping th Eoosiers 46»44g 
Earlier in the season, Southern won 52-41 in Carbondale, 

Southern Coach, Lynn Koldei, has a squad that is rapidly 
approaching full strength as Sam "ilosevich of Zeigler played for 
the first time this year in the Tvansville contest, "\ilosevich was 
a member of last year's National Intercollegiate Championship squad 
and was placed on the all -American second tea:; at Kansas City, where I 
the tourney was held, 

Quentirt s tin sou, center from Eldorado, approached hi a greatest 
heights in the Evansville game as he controlled g great majority of 
the rebounds, 

Oliver Shoaff of :"t, c rmel, and Johnny Sebastian 3a Odin have 
been stamping themselves as the men to watch on the squad. The two 
men have worked out a I ancy passing attack that has thrown more th; 



-2- 
one tear.i into tre jitters, paving t 1 e way for a T'aroon victory. 

Gene Kail of Galatia, and Bob Colborn of Flora, the seemingly 
forgotten men of the team, have played a large part in the lop- 
sided one-and lost record of the Southerners, by virtue of their 
steady guarding end setting up of plays. 

The tickets for the two contests will go on sale at 6:15 pm., 
ecch game night on a first-come first-served basic, the athletic 
department has announced. 



._ ,„J_-L.J- Ut 



«. uiiu o at Southern Illinois Normal University, conducted 
jointly by the University's Child Guidance Clinic and the Illinois 
Institute for Juvenile Research. The institute will be represented 
by Dr. Sophie Schroeder, Chicago psychiatrist, and Mrs. Eadith 
Morales, social worker. 

iiajor emphasis at the clinic will be placed on teacher-training, 
according to Dr. W. a. Thalrnan, Child Guidance Clinic director. The 
program will also include the examination and study of individual 
children. 



I • 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Dailies and Weeklies 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. -Twenty-two Southern Illinois Normal 
University students have been given the '''professional aptitude test fv 
for admission to medical colleges, Dr. Marshall S. Hiskey, dean of 
men, reports. 

Southern was recently designated by the American Association of 
American Medical Colleges as one of the centers in the United States 
at which the official professional aptitude tests could be given for 
pre-admission to medical colleges. The 22 students were tested by 
Dean Hiskey and Mrs. nlice Rector, counseling assistant. 

"We are naturally proud of this further recognition of Southern's 
new status as a university," University President Chester F. Lay said, 
"lie know Southern Illinois students will benefit by it." 

m 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. -Gift of a copy of a new poetry 
anthology, Talent, edited by Ruth Lawrence and published November 1 
has been made to the Southern Illinois Normal University library by 
Miss Mary Minerva McNeill of Greenville, several of whose poems are 
included in the publication. 

Miss McNeill was formerly a member of the University faculty, 

teaching piano and voice. 
i 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. -A two-day psychological clinic will be 
held Jan. 22 and 23 at Southern Illinois Normal Univer.ity, conducted 
jointly by the University's Child Guidance Clinic and the Illinois 
Institute for Juvenile Research. The institute will be represented 
by Dr. Sophie Schroeder, Chicago psychiatrist, and Mrs. Eadith 
Morales, social worker. 

Major emphasis at the clinic will be placed on teacher-training, 
according to Dr. W« a. Thalman, Child Guidance Clinic director. The 
program will also include the examination and study of individual 
children. 



__ _ _ — ___ _ _ — __ _ Southern Illinois 

__ _ _ _ Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

lorena drummond, ed. mmmm^mm^m^^^^mmtm^mi^^^^^^m 



Special to Dailies and Weeklies 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. -Southern Illinois Normal University is 
serving twO-thirds of the State of Illinois, it seems, for last fall 
students from 66 of the State's 102 counties were enrolled at Southern, 
the Registrar's Office reports show. 

Moreover, Southern's influence is stretching beyond the 
boundaries of Illinois, for last tern 45 students from other states 
were anions the 2, 71 ; '-member student body here. 

Southern's fall term enrollment was substantially larger than 
that at any of her sister institutions in the State Teachers College 
system, which included 1,$2$ at Illinois State Normal University, 
1,442 at Northern Illinois State Teachers College, 1,253 at Western 
Illinois State Teachers College, and 1,21$ at Eastern Illinois State 
Teachers College. 

In addition to on-campus student enrollment, Southern had oSO 
students in extension classes, being conducted in 13 counties of 
Southern Illinois. 

Following are the counties which had students at Southern last 
fall term, and those which had extension courses conducted by 
Southern, together with their respective student representation: 



St. Clair 


121 


79 


200 


Saline 


125 


23 


143 


Sangamon 


7 




7 


Schuyler 


1 




1 


Shelby 


1 




1 


Union 


107 


60 


167 


Vermilion 


8 




$ 


Wabash 


19 




19 


Washington 


39 


40 


79 


Wayne 


60 


70 


130 


White 


63 


3o 


99 


Will 


1 




1 


Williamson 


360 


68 


428 


Winnebago 


1 




1 



County 


Resident 


Extension 


Tot a 




Students 


Students 




Adams 


1 




1 


Alexander 


41 


- 


41 


Bond 


7 




7 


Calhoun 


2 




2 


Carroll 


1 




1 


Champaign 


1 




1 

■i 


Christian 


1 




1 


Clark 


5 




5 


Clay 


30 




30 


Clinton 


14 




14 


Cook 


36 




36 


Crawford 


3 




8 


Dupage 


2 




2 


Edwards 


2 




2 


Effingham 


5 




5 


Fayette 


23 




23 


Franklin 


349 


74 


423 


Fulton 


3 




3 


Gallatin 


21 


36 


57 


Greene 


1 




1 


Hamilton 


36 


32 


68 


Hardin 


11 


19 


30 


Iroquois 


1 




1 


Jackson 


535 




535 


Jasper 


1 




1 


Jefferson 


76 


50 


126 


Jersey 


1 




1 


Johnson 


45 




45 


Kankakee 


1 




1 


Kendall 


3 




3 


Lawrence 


6 




6 


Lee 


1 




1 


Livingston 


1 




1 


Logan 


1 




1 


Macon 


4 • 




4 


Macoupin 


31 




31 


Madison 


81 


65 


146 


Marion 


60 




60 


Massac 


20 


35 


55 


McLean 


2 




2 


Menard 


2 




2 


Mercer 


1 




1 


Monroe 


17 


38 


55 


Montgomery 


9 




9 


Peoria 


2 




2 


Perry 


115 


72 


187 


Pike 


2 




2 


Pope 


21 


' 25 


46 


Pulaski 


53 




53 


Randolph 


65 


56 


121 


Richland 


2 




2 


Rock Island 


1 




1 


St. Clair 


121 


79 


200 


Saline 


125 


23 


143 


Sangamon 


7 




7 


Schuyler 


1 




1 


Shelby 


1 




1 


Union 


107 


60 


167 


Vermilion 


8 




8 


Wabash 


19 




19 


Washington 


39 


40 


79 


Wayne 


60 


70 


130 


White 


63 


3o 


99 


Will 


1 




1 


Williamson 


360 


68 


428 


Winnebago 


1 




1 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




January 22, 1947 
Carbondale, 111., Jan... ^Extension classes have been 

opened in 18 Southern Illinois communities this winter by Southern 

Illinois Normal University, Raymond Dey, director of extension, 

reports. 

These courses inc.ude industrial arts, recreational music 

and singing games, child psychology, and various courses in 

education elementary, secondary, and rural. 

These courses are being taught this term in Anna, Benton, 

Cairo, Centralis, Chester, Christopher, "" rst St. Louis, Edwardsvillc, 

Earrisburg, Johnston City, Narlssa, rounds, I-'t. Vernon, Nashville, 

P inckney vill e , Sale m , Sh n wn set own , an d 7/s t crloo, 

J'.HIL 

Www 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. The colorful I T aroon Band of Southern 
Illinois Normal University will present its first public concert of 
this year V/ednesday, Jan. 29, under the direction o f Harold Hines, 
instructor in band. 

The 66-piece University band p rformed at football games last 
fall and has made several other appearances both on and off campus, 
but is making its bow next week, as a concert band, 

'"r. Nines, former Army band conductor, joined the University 
faculty last f""*l. 

The concert will be given in Shryock Auditorium at 3 p.m. 



The public is invited. 



m 



to ovc within a few days. 
Southern re a I ?st among the :ivc teas 1 - rs colleges a 
normal uni\ j ics in the State possession of some of v 

the apartments in lbs t . jeet i ' 5 get ve famil ics 

actually ; illcd, pres • D i a i, n e( j 

Dhiv i I r v tors 1 

r the T( '.trz Coll ire" m< 




Southern Illinois 
Normd University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. -Eighteen more student veterans end 
their families have moved into the new housing project at Southern 
Illinois Normal University, mailing a fcotal of oO apartments occupied. 

'"eanwhilc beds have arrived, an< nis' lays arc now on hand 
so that acldi bianal apartments ca] '■ occupied as rapidly as the units 
are completed by the contractors . : 1 turned over to the University 
by Federal Public Housing Authority. 

The 39 student veterans now installed in the new apartments are: 
Donald 0. Brazel, Belleville; Herman E. Hines, Sparta; Darrell Glenn 
Cunnir.fb.ar!!, Herrin; Charles E. Taylor; Benton; Thomas Barrett, 
Eldorado; Russell J'cSparih, . C :r: ier hillcc; "'. D. v " iteside, Cambria; 
Elmer Giliey, Ilarrisburg; Franl: Dunst, hew Brunswick, h. J.; 
Arthur Hunter, Chicago; Donald h Dodson, Grccnview; Charles Bremer, 
DuQuoin; John he Cart;;. , Herrin; Arthur Ealfcr, Scsscr; Lynn Holder, 
Carbond. lc; Archie Griff en, Carbondale; William Carlylc, Sparta; ; 
Ja mes Tooley, Central Cit , ITy. 

Anson A. Ilinkley, Carbond... le; hiliburn Outlan, Carbondale; 
Clifton J, Kirk, Fairfield; James D. Ilay, Carbondale; Harold Drake, 
Lleville; Jo 1 :!! R, ;;ecd, Cent::!,.;.; Karvir 0. Carlich, Carbond le; 
•■ i '.'.hod, Keenes; George E. hovaca, 'Vest Frankfort; Henneth c 
I'clntire, Grand Chain; Charles E. House, Tamaroa; Iov r Curtis Hancock, 
Harrisburg; William lynch,. Ullin; Ernest :;. Limpus, h ton; Robert 
Kesterson, Hinysville, ho.; ".."alter I, Stone, 'Vest Frankfort; Donald 
I. Doerr", DuQuoin; Clarence Bin r, F^lts; herr.ech G. S: ith, 
Harissa; Leland E. Achby, Eldorado; and Frank ';. Hbake, Jo' Bton C ity. 

A. J. Shafter of Carbondai ind Edscl Balchr/in of Sesser arc 
expected to ove within a few days. 

Southern was the first among the five teachers colleges and 
nornal universities in the State bo obtain possession of so^:e of v 
the apartments m its nev; ho i project and to yet vei f mil aes 
actually/ Installed, presidents Ox bhe other .' o-*r schools informed 
Dhiversit inistrators here • tY ere in C 

Ls lor the Teachers Colic mi . 



. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. Bl^^^MH^^^^HII^^^^^BI^^Hi 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. -The Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference lead will again be at stake when the Southern Illinois 
Normal University "Junior V/hiz Kids" play host to Northern Illinois 
Huskies next Saturday night at 3:15 p.m. 

The preliminary game between the Maroon Bees and Herrin Supply 
Independents will get under way at 7 p.m., with tickets going on sale 
at 6:15 p.m., on the usual first-come first-served basis, the athletic 
department has announced. 

Northern is currently tied with the Maroons in loop play as each 
team has an identical record of two wins against no losses. Southern 
has knocked off Western and Eastern, while Western and State Normal 
have been the victims of the Huskies. 

The Southerners will be gunning for their twelvth win in this 
contest. They were upset last Monday by a fighting Hillikin squad 
from Decatur 52-47 for their fifth loss of the season. 

The Huskies will be without the services of their six-foot six- 
inch center, Siegrif , as it has been reported that he has quit school. 
On the other hand, the Maroons will be rested from the tough grind 
that marked last week's play and should regain their old form in this 
contest. 

The probable starting lineup for the Maroons will be Johnny 
Sebastian of Odin and Oliver Shoaff of Mt. Carmel at forward, Quentin 
Stinson of Eldorado at center, and bob Colborn of Flora and Gene Hall 
of Galatia at guard. 

Their defeat last Monday clearly showed the grueling effect of 

the tough schedule they are following this year. However, the athletic 

department has announced that this year's schedule was necessary in 

order to contact some of the new opponents that have been lined up. 

The Maroons have only three more home fames alter this Northern- 
Southern tilt, spending nearly the entire month of February on the 
road. 

Carbondale, 111, Jan. -Leland P. Lingle, track . nd cross-country 
coach at Southern Illinois Normal University, was a guest speaker at 
the Du Quoin Rotary club last Monday night. 

Lingle's topic was "A Summer Recreation Program." Movies of the 
National Intercollegiate basketoall tournament, which Southern won 
last year, were shown when the speakers were finished. 

mil 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service c " ,ol,l>A "' '"•■■oii 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■^■■■■^^■■MHBHBBMHHBIH 



1-23-&7 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. 23 -The future success of democracy in 
Germany defends largely upon economic conditions inside Germany and on 
the international situation in general, a Southern Illinois . ormal 
University political scientist declared here tonight. 

Dr. Frank L. Klingberg, associate professor of government at the 
University, spoke tonight on the second of a series of forums on the 
international situation sponsored on the campus by the Independent 
Student Union. Dr. Klingberg' s subject was "The Denazification of 
Germany." 

"The terms of the German treaty of peace, now under discussion in 
London, will help determine many German attitudes," he pointed out. 

"Democracy will have little change of permanent growth unless 
Germany can develop tolerable economic conditions. German politics 
will likewise reflect the relative strength of the Russian influence 
in relation to the Anglo-American influence." 

If the "Big Four" can develop unity and consistency in the 
treatment of Germany, Dr. Klingberg believes, the chances of a 
military revival in Germany are slight. 

"Ultimately," he declared, "the Germans need to have the hope that 
if they develop peaceful and constructive ways, they will be able to 
join in building a prosperous and peaceful Europe and world, as a 
newly-respected member of the family of nations." 

He said the aims of United States, as in 1918, are (1) to remove 
the military power of Germany; (2) to eliminate the German desire for 
war and conquest; and (3) to help develop a cooperative, democratic 
Germany, but care is being taken to avoid the errors of 1913. 

"Our denazification program, in a broad sense, has both negative 
and positive aspects," Dr. Klingberg explained. "Negatively, it aims 
at the removal of Nazis and Nazism from influence in Germany. 
Positively, it hopes to stimulate the re-education of the German people 
and the development of democratic government. 

"Early in our occupation, all Nazi organizations, discriminatory 
Nazi laws, and efforts to propagate Nazi doctrines were made illegal. 






' 



' 



.... 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBOMDALE - "■" M °^ 

lorena drummond, ed. wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmammmmmmm 



Carbon dale, 111., Jan. — "he Southern Illinois Hormal University student 
band is scheduled to entertain a Southern Illinois audience with a concert in 
Shryock Auditorium on January 29, 8 p.m. 

Director of the hand is Harold Hines, instructor in music ea r l'cr, r . >r Army band 
director. Among the band members who will take part in the concert ares 

Kola Bryant, flute, Lorraine Carrington, clarinet, Dorothy Coleman, clarinet, 
Charles Dickerman, clarinet, James Parmer, baritone, David Mcintosh, snare drums, 
Q. U. Miskell, trombone, all of Carbondale : 

Helen Dick, clarinet, l T aorai Kuehner, tympani, Marian Lamb, clarinet, Clarence 
Hay, clarinet, Carolyn Killer, oboe, John Mulkin, clarinet, all of Herrin : William 
Green, sousaphone, Robert Howey, drums, Alice I vers, baritone, all of Fairfield ! 
Sillie Hagler, flute, William Ledbetter, Lila Spencer, alto-saxophone, Mary Stevens, 
cornet, all of Murphy sb or o : Ada Cover, trumpet, Margaret Woodward, clarinet, Centralia ; 

Fred Fleming, clarinet, Donald Harriss, trombone, ITorman Jones, clarinet, all of 
Christopher : Paul Althoff, cornet, Roger Hoffman, cornet, both of "Vain ever : Obed 
Henderson, trumpet, Emma June Pinkham, French horn, Mary Lou Pinkham, clarinet, all 
of 3enton ; 3en E. Moore, clarinet, Hobert Sawson, euphonium, both of West Pranlcfort : 

"ilford "rooks, trombone, Arthur Helford, S. St . Louis : Charlene Sprankel, 
clarinet, Ruth Sprankel, alto-saxophone, Waterloo : Paul Jo3 r ner, trombone, Sack 
Warren, trumpet, Marion : Donald Lance, trombone, Jerome Seltzer, clarinet, a! tamont : 
James 3owlingi alto-saxophone , Douell : Roberta Brink, clarinet, Horleton : Thomas 
Bryant, alto- saxophone, Rid^way : Carl Bradshaw, sousaphone, Grayville : Marlin Bun- 
fill, trombone, Rushville : Robert Chaney, trumpet, Pi or a : 

Jesse Cook, clarinet, Du Quoin : Jack Piscus, baritone-saxophone, Carlyle : 
Alard Hamilton, clarinet, St . Louis, ■■'o .: Robert Harmon, clarinet, Lincoln : Lloyd 
Higgerson, trumpet, Valier : Doris Ivy, French horn, ITprris City : Rosie Knight, alto- 
saxophone, Rio Hando , Tex . : Angelo Leoni, trumpet, B ellevill e; Robert Mjddendorf, 
Freeburg . trumpet; Xathryn Kiddleton, baritone, Xenia ; Robert 0'3rien, trombone, 3reese : 

Kenneth Piercy, tenor-saxophone, Pllery.; Paul Pursell, tenor-saxophone, 

Pincknevville : Genevieve Porter, snare dr ,r m, McLean sb pro : Mary Rosenberger, trympet, 

Jerrol Williams, French horn, Salem 
Dahl : ;;ren : /Lenora Sills, bassoon, 5a-lem : Mel Siener, sousaphone, CollinsviJLle : 

Rachel 'Waters, snare drym, Pocahontas , Ark . : Harlan Wile", bass drym, Piano : James 

Witter, tr-rroet, Chester. 



* * * 



■ ■MPMPM* 



< 






m ^ l ^^ m ^ mmmmm ^ mmmm ^ mmmmm ^ Southern Illinois 

__^____ Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE - »"mom 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. fl^BBBBMHMBi^BMBraBBBMBMBHMMBQ 



1-23-47 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. -Thirteen paintings by Ben Watkins, 

assistant professor of art at Southern Illinois Normal University, 
are currently on display in the University's "Little dall.ory," on 
the second floor of Old Main. 

This exhibit is made up of six oils, two drawings and. five water 
colors, all of which were recently shown at Ohio Uesleyan University. 

The pictures represent Watkins" experiments in painting during 
the past five or six years, abstract in quality, they show no ■.' . . 
emphasis on beauty or prettiness but rather express feeling or 
reaction to a particular experience. The influence of studies in 
scientific areas such as optics and other phases of physics is ... 
indicated. 

"Perhaps the work of Feinin^er, Franz March and others of the 
German expressionistic school have been my guide posts in this attempt 
to formulate a personal way of painting," Mr. Watkins explained in 
discussing the exhibit. 

The show will remain on exhibit through February 1, and will be 
followed by an exhibition of prints of Die^o Riviera's frescoes and 
woodcuts by Posada. Both of these Mexican artists are internationally 
known . 



Heverthe less, the nower of the defending charms lies with these five men, 
Stinson, Milosevic!!, Cabutti, Sebastian and Shoaff. 

The Southerners had a taste of what the competition will be when they entered 
a Christmas tourney at Kansas City. They overcame the Colorado Aggiei in the first 
game, but drooped the championship contest to Rockhurst. Those games were playe* 
without Cabutti and Milosevic!! so they do not show very well the pover of the 
Maroons. 

According to Athletic Director Glenn "Abe" Martin, who coached the team last 



__ ^ m ^ mmmmm ^ mm ^ Southern Illinois 

' Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE ' ""now 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. MHHBSlBBmSBBaMMBBBaBBBMnBaKmBBBB 



1-27-47 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. ~A two-day Egyptian Speech Festival v;ill be held at 
Southern Illinois Normal University February 23-Harch 1, Dr. P. 11. Larson, chairman 
of the speech department, has announced. 

Invitations are going to approximately 150 colleges in Illinois, Indiana, 
Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Missouri to send speech teams to participate in 
the festival. 

Two lectur- forums with outstanding speakers are being planned in connection 
with major topics to be considered by the discussion grouos. 

Fourteen events will be staged in which the college teams may "oarticipate: 
original oratory, for men and women; women' s poetry reading; men' s oratorical ' -' : 
declamation; dramatic reading, for men and women; radio newscasting; extemporaneous 
sneaking, for men and women; grouo discussion; debate, for men and women; and 
beginner's debate. 

Carbondale, 111., Jon. -Joseph H. Baxter, instructor in Latin-American 
history at Southern Illinois ITormal University, will speak on "Our Good Ueighbor 
Policy" on Thursday- evening, Jan. 30, in the Little Theater. 

Mr. Baxter will be the third speaker on the weekly forum series which is being 
presented by the Independent Student Union on current international problems. 

The public is invited. 

SMS 

V II II it 



Heverthe less, the power of the defending champs lies with these five men, 
Stinson, Milosevich, Cabutti, Sebastian and Shoaff. 

The Southerners had a taste of what the competition will be when they entered 
a Christmas tourney at Kansas City. They overcame the Colorado Aggies in the first 
game, but drooped the championship contest to Rockhurst. Those games were played 
without Cabutti and Milosevics so they do not show very well the pow of the 
Maroons. 

According to Athletic Director Glenn "Abe" Martin, who coached the team last 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - ,IUWI " 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■ ■ "^"™ ^ ■■■■^ ^" mt^mm^ 



1-29-47 

Car"bondale, 111., Jan. -Architect's "blueprints for the landscape development 
of the proposed new Training School site at Southern Illinois ITormal University 
have "been completed and call for "bids en site preparation will probably be issued 
shortly, Chance S. Kill, State landscape architect, has notified University 
authorities here. 

"The advertisement and opening of "bids will probably take from four to five 
weeks," Mr. Hill wrote University President Chester P. Lay, "and if contract prices 
are favorable, the work should "be under way approximately three or four weeks there- 
after." 

"We hope that the State Department of Architecture and Engineering can arrange 
for the early beginning of work on the new power plant and other structures for 
which funds have been appropriated," President Lay declared. "While we have been 
informed that present appropriations allocated for this work are likely to be 
insufficient for completion of the projects, we hope that work can at least be 
started, and we are looking with confidence to the General Assembly to provide 
additional appropriations for completion of these buildings." 

The administration and faculty of the University have been giving consideration 
to the needs of the University to determine what additional buildings are most 
urgently needed to care for antitipated increases in student enrollment and further 
expansion of the institution's physical plant , since it is expected that a call for 
such information will come shortly from the Post-War Planning Commission. 

The State Teachers College Board, governing agency for Southern, has already 
made plans to push legislation which would permit the issuance of bonds for the 
construction of dormitories and other self-liquidating projects at Southern and the 
othern normal university raid state teachers colleges. 



leverthe less, the power of the defending champs lies with these five men, 
Stinson, Milosevics, Cabutti, Sebastian and Shoaff. 

The Southerners had a taste of what the competition will be when they entered 
a Christmas tourney at Kansas City. They overcame the Colorado Aggie a in the first 
game, but drooped the championship contest to Rockhurst. Those games were play* 
without Cabutti and Milosevic!! so they do not show very well the power of the 
Maroons. 

According to Athletic Director Glenn "Abe" Martin, who coached the team last 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



1-29-47 



Carbondalei 111., Jan. -In approximately one month, the Southern Illinois 
ITormal University basketball squad will be on the "spot". That is, they will be 
called upon to defend their national Intercollegiate title w 1 ich they won last 
year at Kansas City. 

This year' s defending first five now boasting of three returning men from 
last year plus a letter man from 1941 and a letter man from the University of 
Illinois, have managed to look like world-beaters at times, and at other times have 
looked just the opposite. 

. Many sportcasters seem to think that the Maroons are potentially greater 
than they were last year when they won the title. 

They prove this on paper as follows: Quentin Stinson, six-foot four-inch 
center from Eldorado, has a year of experience under his belt and is playing much 
better ball than he did last year* 

Likewise with guards Sam Milosbvich of Zeigler and Leedio Cabutti of Johnston 
City. Both have been sidelined with similiar leg injuries, but both are expected 
to be on hand in good shape for the Kansas City Tourney. 

The two replacements on the squad, Oliver Shoaff of Mt. Carmel and Johnny 
Sebastian of Odin, have been ranked by many as among the leading shotmakers of the 
day in basketball, Sebastian is able to pump two-handers from any place inside the 
center' line, while Shoaff s one-handed push shot is deadly from 40 feet on in. 

The men who they replaced are Don Sheffer of Zeigler who graduated, and Gene 
Stotlar of Pinckneyvillo who is taking a pre^-med course. . Stotlar was named the most 
valuable in the Kansas City tourney. 

However, neither Stotlar nor Sheffer \\rere such deadly s'-ote as Shoaff and 
Sebastian, although their defensive game was much tighter. 

Ue^erthe less, the power of the defending champs lies with these five meni 
Stinson, Milosevich, Cabutti, Sebastian and Shoaff. 

The Southerners had a taste of what the competition will be when they entered 
a Christmas tourney at Kansas City. They overcame the Colorado Aggies in the first 
game, but dropped the championship contest to Rockhurst. Those games were played 
without Cabutti and Milosevich so they do not show very well the power of the 
Maroons. 

According to Athletic Director Glenn "Abe" Martin, who coached the team last 



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E9Haac= 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CIIIM ""' »"»<>» 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■^■■■■■■■■^■■■■■iMBBHB 



-3- 

year, it takes a good team plus a lot of luck to win the tournament. 

This year, newly appointed mentor, Lynn C. Holder, has the makings of a good 
team. Whether he will have the luck or not will he shown on March 10, when the 
Southerners open at Kansas City. 

wfnnr 

:i In the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, the Southerners are at 
the top of the heap, with three wins and no losses. Their next opponent is 
Illinois State Normal University, the only member of the League the Maroons have 
not faced this season. This game will he played at Normal Feh. 1. 






— ■ — - - 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - ILLINOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^■■^^^^^^^^^^^■■^^B 



1-30-47 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. -One complete circuit in the Illinois 
intercollegiate Athletic Conference will be in the Southern Illinois 
Normal Maroons' books after next Saturday night when they travel to 
State Normal to engage the basement-dwelling Redbirds in the Maroons' 
fourth conference game of the season. 

The Maroons have met and defeated Western, Eastern, and Northern, 
in that order, and are looking forward to Saturday night's encounter 
to strengthen their already-firm hold on first place in the loop. 

The Southerners now hold a season's record of 12 wins against 
six losses. However, five of these six defeats have come while on the 
road, and none have been in conference play. 

On Wednesday night, the Southerners resembled the "Scoreless 
Wonders 1 ' in the first half of a game at Cape Girardeau against the 
Cape Indians, and their rally in the last half still left them with 
a 51-40 deficit when the final -un sounded. Thus the two teams have 
split the season's series, as Southern took the game played in 
Carbondale previously 42-39. 

The Maroons' next home game will feature the University of 
Chicago five next Wednesday night, February 5, The contest is 
scheduled to get under way at 6:15, with the preliminary game set for 
7 p.m. Tickets for the. tilt will go on sale at 6:15 p.m., the 
athletic department has announced. 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. -"athletics in the Future 1 ' was the 
subject of Athletic Director Glenn "kbe" Martin's speech to the 
Christopher Rotary and Lions clubs last Monday night, when he was 
guest speaker at a meeting of these or anizations. 

innriT 



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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^■■i^^BBHBM^^BB^^Bi^MI 



2-3-47 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. 3 -Application for temporary buildings to provide 
emergency classroom., library and office s-oace has been made by Southern Illinois 
Normal University to the Federal Works Ageneyi University President Chester F. Lay 
announced today. 

On the basis of an evaluation made on Southern's casmus by the U. S. Office of 
Education, Chicago, Southern has an immediate critical need for 17,458 square feet 
additional space, and has applied for tenoorar-o- structures to -provide this amount. 

Dr. Clarence E. Jose".'hson, chief educational officer of the U. S. Office of 
Education, Chicago, personally inspected the Southern "ohysical plant, and has 
certified to the FWA that "The following specific facilities are required" in order 
for Southern "to provide adequate educational facilities for those veterans who 
have been enrolled or have signified their intention of enrolling at this 
institution: Classroom s")ace — 11,295 square feet; faculty and administrative office 
space — 2,150; library reading rooms — 4,000." 

The Federal Works Agency is authorized to supply temporary buildings to 
educational institutions on certification by the U. S. Office of Education of their 
need, "defending on the availability of the property in surplus government stocks 
and of appropriated funds necessary to make the property usable by the institution." 

Southern's physical ;olant, which has not received the addition of a new class- 
room or office building since 1929, was taxed by the school's enrollment of 1,531 
students last spring, and has been doubly overcrowded ov- the enrollment of 2,713 
students last fall and 2,589 this winter. Enrollment of is expected to go still 

higher next year. 

The Southern Library was built in 1903 to accommodate approximately 300 "V . ' • ' 
students, and has not been enlarged since... Book stack s^ace is inadequate to house 
the present 45,000books, 5,000 public documents and 10,000 bound periodicals, and 
since the institution has become a university substantial expansion of library 
materials is highly desirable. 

Exoansion of Southern into a university, plus the booming postwar enrollment, 
has already greatly enlarged the administrative staff and teaching faculty, and 
further additions are anticipated. These additions to staff and faculty have made 
office space a critical problem. 

Temporary housing from the FWA would greatly relieve the space shortage at the 
University pending construction of permanent buildings, including those for which 
funds have already been appropriated and those which will be sought from the 
General Assembl" at its currnt session. Estimates recently furnished the 
University administration by the State Department of Architecture and Engineering 
indicate that, on the basis of current costs, present appropriations are inadequate 
to construct the training school, ulant, shops, and service building which have 
already been authorized for construction in the current biennium. 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



2-3-47 
Carbondale, 111., Jan. -A Choral Clinic for Southern Illinois 
high school singers will be held at Southern Illinois Normal University- 
February 22, Floyd V. Wakeland, associate professor of music, has 
announced. 

This will mark the sixth year such a choral clinic has been 
sponsored by the University music department, and already registration 
is far above that for any previous year. Last year, approximately 700 
high school boys and girls attended the clinic, and to date more than 
#00 have been entered by 2} high schools. 

ififff 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. -Raymond L. Croswell, a teacher in the 
West Frankfort Community High School, has been appointed part-time 
instructor for the spring term in the department of zoology at Southern 
Illinois Normal University, the President's Office has announced. 

Mr. Crowell will drive over from West Frankfort twice each week to 
conduct an evening class in zoology. 

A graduate of Southern, Mr. Crowell Holds the master's degree from 
the University of Illinois. 

.'I JUL 

in i ft 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. -The Little Theater, student dramatic 
organization at Southern Illinois Normal University, is sponsoring a 
one-act play contest for other student organizations, and is bringing 
Theodore Skinner, Northwestern University drama professor, to the 
campus to serve as judge for the final competition on Feb. 6. 

The three plays chosen in preliminaries will be given a public 
presentation Thursday night, and a plaque will be presented to the 
winning organization, medals to the cast of the winning play, and medals 
to the outstanding actor and the outstanding actress in the 
competition. 

#### 



— ^ ^ _ ^ _ -i— Southern Illinois 

____^_ a _^__ Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. amBH^HnHaHBU^n 



Special to Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. — President Chester 1 F. Lay and throe 
mer.bcrs of the administrative staff at Southern Illinois formal 
University will attend the national meetings of the .^.rrican Associatior 
of Teachers Colleges and the American Association of School Administratoi 
which v:ill be held in Atlantic City, 8f»J, . from February 28 throurh 
March 6. 

In addition to Dr.. lay, those to attend the meeting are Dr. Fu^one 
R, Fair, dean of the College of Education; F-, Douglas E, Lawson, 
professor of education; and John D. J'ees, principal of the University 
High School. 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. — Vthletio Coach Orient: "Abe" I'artin 
and Lynn Folder, instructor in physical education, of Sout! 3rn Illinois 
Normal University, vjoumryod to Kerrin th:.r. week to shci the movies 
of the rational Intercollegiate Athleti: Basketball Tourn lent held 
in Kansas City last year. The I'aroon ;hai pious were shown to the 
Herrin High School basketball team at an air: lal banquet riven by the 
Eerrin Elks club. 

# # # 



Students rrom enc roi lowing colleges ana uaj.v.r;.ii.ica wj.j.j. u u uuum 



the festival: Greenville College, Greenville; Principia College, Flsak- 
Eureka College, Eureka Colic- c, Eureka; Eastern state Teachers College, 
Charleston; Illinois State ITonnal University, Formal; Lake Forrest 
College, Lake Forrest; all of Illinois; "ockhurst College, Kansas City, 

J'o.; Southwest Baptist Colle e, bolivar, Fo.j St. Louis diversity, St. 
Louis, ; r o. '"ebstcr Colic c, Fcbster "roves, Fo.j Southwestern, Feuphis, 
Tenn.; ;'urray State Teachers College, Fy. 

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F,C 



Southern Illinois Normal university Information Service 
Lorcna Drummond, Editor 
FJelea6e Friday 



Special to Dailies 



Carhond.ale, 111., Fob. --Twelve co]' universities of 

Illinois and neighboring states have accepte 1 tions to participate 
in the Egyptian Speech Festival being sponsored t'j Southern Illinois 
Normal Uhiversi ty Fe b . 23- ! Tar • 1 • 

The two-day festival, under the direction of Dr. P. Fcrville 
Larson, chairman of the Southern speech department, will embrace a 
v;idc variety of oratorical events. Included will be men and women 1 s 
original oratory., women's poetry reading, men f R oratorical declamation, 
men and women's dramatic reading, radio ncv.c 1 sac ting, junior and senior 
men and women's ea ,. poraneous speaking, beginning and .ienced 
men and women',? debate, and group discussion. 

Two lecture forums have been planned as feature attractions, one 
on T T .S.- T ~.S.S. "h relations, the other on ial 3r-msnn-;€ aen: relations. 

I':ror Charles Estes, liaison commissioner., U.3 7 Conciliation Servic 
has been secured as main s eaker for the event; An e::_. r-n; on ousiness 
and industrial relations, Estes is the author jf a numb a . ooeks 
dealing with labor-management problems saa allied subjects, He has 
appeared as speaker on programs of the 2u? i State Industrial Conference, 
the St. Louis Executives' Training Forum the Texas Personnel Conference 
and many other groups'. 



El 



a n 



ecture and forum discussion, "Labcr-T!anagement Relations," 



will he open to the public, and is to be given Friday, Feb. 28 at 8 p.m., 

Dr. Willis G. Swartz, professor of government and chairman of ahe 
University Graduate studies Committee, will leaf the second forum, and 
will he presented at the dinner session Friday evening. 

Students from the following colleges and universities will attend 
the festival; Greenville College, Greenville; Principia College, Elsak; 
Eureka College, Eureka College, Eureka; "Gar-' tern State Teachers. College, 
Charleston; Illinois State Formal University, Formal; Lake Forrest 
College, I ahe Forrest; all of gllinois; ^ockhurst Co] , Kansas City, 
J'o.; Southwest Baptist Colic e, Bolivar, Fo.; St. Louis University, St, 
Louis, ro. Webster College, "ebster "roves, go.; Southwestern, Memphis, 
Tenn.; "uaray State Teachers College, Fy. 

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'I 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CABBO,,DA "' ILL1HOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. IMi^^^^^^MMMM^^^^^MMI^MI 



Release Saturday 

Carbondale, 111., 1'eb. — a concert of violin music by James E. 
Lands of Harrisburg will be given on the ,7 Music Is Yours 1 ' radio program 
over station MC1L, Carbondale, Monday at 2:15. 

"'Music Is Yours" is one of five program broadcast Monday through 
Friday at 2:1$ over MCIL by Southern Illinois Normal University. 

Lands will play the first movement of Mozart f s Concerto in G. He 
will be accompanied at the piano by Georgia Gher of Carbondale. The 
announcer for the program will be Vern Baird of Elkville. 

if if tr 

Release Monday 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. — The Student Newscast of Southern 
Illinois Normal University will feature four students in news accounts 
over radio station ' J CIL, Carbondale, Tuesday, February 25, at 2:15 p.m. 

kalph Lane of Eldorado will announce. Newscasters will be James 
Dodd of Eldorado; Bob McDowell, ii. St. Louis; Fred Crimin^er, Dupo; 
and Mary Ruth Tayloro. Creal Springs* 

if W ~n~ 



week, by sinking 11 points in nine minutes, and Leedio Cabutti of 
Johnston City, who is coming along rapidly after a early season leg 

in jurv. 

Boyd Wilson of Fairfield, Charles Goss of Marion, and Johnny 
Ruzich. of Johnston City are the three other players who are making t id 
jaunt. All three are freshmen capers. 

The Eastern Panthers will feature Elmo Hildebrand, set shot 
artist who has been bothered by shin splits all season, and a whole 
team that has been going -laces recently. Their latest victims were 
the Evansville Aces, who Southern defeated twice this season. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^■^■I^^M^HB^M^^^HHB 



Release Friday 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -A chance to take undisputed possession 
of the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference will be provided 
tonight for the Southern Illinois Normal University iiaraons, when they, 
journey to Charleston to meet the third-place Eastern State Teachers. 

The two quintets met once before, here in Carbondale, and the 
Southerners came out on the heavy end of a 56-33 score, but the 
Easterners were reported to have had a vf bad" night, and are waiting 
to pour it on the maroons tonight before a local crowd. 

However, the Southerners, after a week's rest should put up a 
stiff fight in order to annex their second consecutive loop crown. 
Coach Lynn Holder's charges are assured of a tie at the present time, 
and have to win only one more out of three remaining league games to 
t©p the honers. 

A hard road trip faces the Holder-men this weekend, though, with 
Eastern on Friday night, the University of Chicago on Saturday night 
in Chicago, and then their last home game of the Season against State 
Normal on Monday night. 

The Maroons, always a home team, have found the going rough on 
the road, dropping only one home game this season, while losing seven 
on the circuit. 

Johnny Sebastian of Odin, "Mr. Two Hands r ' ; Oliver Shoaff of Mt. 
Carmel, '"Mr. One Hand"; ^uentin Stinson. of Eldorado, bob Colborn of 
Flora, and Gene Hall of Galatia, starting five, are expected to carry 
most of the load, with a lot of help expected from Sam Milosevicn of 
Zeigler, who hit his peak of the season in the Western contest last 
weeK, oy sinking 11 points in nine minutes, and Leedio Cabutti of 
Johnston City, who is coming along rapidly after a early season leg 



injury. 

Boyd Wilson of Fairfield, Charles Goss of Marion, and Johnny 
Ruzich. of Johnston City are the three other players who are making the 
jaunt. All three are freshmen cagers. 

The Eastern Panthers will feature Elmo Hildebrand, set shot 
artist who has been bothered by shin splits all season, and a whole 
team that has been going ^laces recently. Their latest victims were 
the Evansville Aces, who Southern defeated twice this season. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - ILLINOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. — ■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■^ 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Another successful step in the defense 
of the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference crown was taken by 
the Southern Illinois Normal University I'laroons in the road trip last 
Friday and Saturday, as they tripped Western Teachers 5$-49 i R Macomb 
on Friday. Saturday night the Southerners dropped a non-loop tilt to 
Millikin of Decatur 63-51* 

The Maroons took a 27-22 lead in the Leatherneck contest, as 
Western cooled off during the last ten minutes of the first half, and 
then poured it on their conference opponents in the final stanza, 

Quentin Stinson, sophomore center from Eldorado racked up 13 points 
for the winners, while Johnny Sebastian, senior forward from Odin, 
fMr. Two Hands," followed with 13. Oliver Shoaff, junior forward 
from lit. Carmel, "Mr. One Hand," and Gene Hall, senior guard from 
Galatia, each had nine. 

•Pill Vfill^ six-foot four- inch center with a deformed left arm, 
was the high point man in the game as he added 14 tallies to the 
losers cause. 

On the following nite, against Milliking, Shoaff re- injured. 
his bad ankle, and Sebastian was slowed down with a cold, thus losing 
the Maroon scoring punch, and the Big Blue quickly tool: advantage 
of their travel-weary opponetg, running up a 24-6 score in the first 
ten minutes of play. 

The Decatur-men hit eighty percent of their shots during this 
time, but then fell off as a result of some close guarding by Hall, 
Col^orn, and Sam Milosevich of Zeigler, who played his best game of 
the sec son in this contest, : r ilosevich has been side-lined nearly 
all season with a leg injury, ut looked as if he were ready to r ;o 
the distance last Saturday night. 

Once again Stinson, who switched from the p?.vot position to 
forward part of the game, look scoring honors. Ke poured 13 points 
t rough the hoop before he fouled out, dee? in the last canto. 

The I'aroona fought back amely, pulling o within t\ o pointa 
of their foes in the second, half, 32-34, 1 ut bhe pace was boo hot 
ien Toby Althoff, st-r-~ lllikin forward, be^an to hit again. 

Ooach Lynn Holder was not too dissatisfied with t] - of 
his charges on this tri d since t he" came home with a clean slate on 



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the "lost" side of the conference ledger, and five wins in the 
"Victory" margin. 

Next weekend, the Southerners will have another grueling trip, 
as they tackle Eastern Teachers in Charleston on Friday nite, and 
then move north to do battle in a return engagement with the 
University of Chicago. 

The Southerners c?n virtually tie up the conference crown 
next weekend as they entertain State Formal next I'onday night, 
for the last home game of the season, 

### 

Carbondale, 111. Feb* -Fred "Trick" Young, well-known 
basketball official and sports editor of the Bloonington PANTAGRAPH 
will serve as one of the officials in the National intercollegiate 
Athletic Basketball tourney to be held in Kansas City, yarch 10-16, 
according to E. S. Liston, secretary- treasurer of the NIAB. 

Other officials are Alvin Pell, from Little '"lock, Arkansas, 
of the Southwest conference, Ted O'Sullivan, from Kansas City, of 
the rissouri Valley confere nee, and Ike Cra ig, from Chicago, of the 
Big Nine Conference, 

The Southern Illinois yormal University yaroons won this tourn- 
a ment last year, winning their five ga r.:es in si;: days, and this 
year will be defending their laruels against some of the best post- 
war competition in the nation. 

fffnr 



Harrisburg, Captain Dome; Ralph Lane, Eldorado, General Beaujean; 
Bill Hudgens, Carbondale, Fleet Foot; Robert Dunhouse, Sparta, 
Scout; Floyd Jones, Marion, Bishop; Jerry Seltzer, Altamont, Soldier, 
Weber will also serve as announcer for the program. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^■■■■■■^■i^^^Ml^^B^BM^Ml^^M^^^Bl 



Release Tuesday 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. — The Rural Life Club of Southern 
Illinois Normal University will be featured in the "Campus Chatter" 
radio program over station WCIL, Carbondale (1020 k.c.) at 2:15 p.m. 
Wednesday. 

Students who will take part on the broadcast will be Lois 
Rowland, discussion leader, of Christopher; Robert Goddard **orion' 
Jean Bower, Jonesboro; Mary Lou Coul^as, Valier; and llrs. Helen 
Purkable 

announcer for "Campus Chatter" will be John Koonce of V/atseka. 

II it n 
WWW 



Release Wednesday 



i: 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. — Drama under the title of "Braddock T s 
Defeat" will be enacted by the Little Theatre members of Southern 
Illinois Normal University at 2:15 p.m. over station WCIL (1020 k.c.) 
in Carbondale tomorrow. 

Characters in the- radio play will be portrayed by Charles 
Weber of Cairo, as General Braddock; George Seifert, Du'.uoin, 
Col. Washington; John Koonce, Watseka, Dr. Craik; Louis Gaskins, 
Harrisburg, Captain Dome; Ralph Lane, Eldorado, General Beau jean; 
Bill Hudgens, Carbondale, Fleet Foot; Robert Dunhouse, Sparta, 
Scout; Floyd Jones, Marion, Bishop; Jerry Seltzer, Altamont, Soldier. 

Weber will also serve as announcer for the program. 






_ ^ ,^ Southern Illinois 

' Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^HBBBiliHBBBBBnEB3BBBIlBi 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. -In quest of their 14 victory in 20 starts 
the Southern Illinois Normal University quintet will invade the Indiana 
State Teachers domain in Terre Kaute, Indiana next Saturday night for 
a non-conference game with the Hoosiers. 

The Southerners were victorious when the two teams met on the 
Carbondale hardwood last December 20, when they downed the Scyamores 
57-54. However, the Hoosiers left the floor dissatisfied with the 
results, and. therefore they will be keyed up to even the series. 

Southern coach Lynn C. Holder, has indicated that he will stick 
by his guns with Oliver Shoaff of kit. Carmel, Johnny Sebastian of Odin, 
Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, Gene Hall of Galatia, and Bob Colborn of 
Flora, with Sam Milosevich of Zeigler and Leedio Cabutti of Johnston 
City slated to see plenty of action. 

The Maroons had a breather in their contest with Chicago last 
Wednesday night, downing them 71-31, and also displaying some of the 
best team-work shown by them this far. This was proved in the scoring 
as Stinson counted 14 points, Shoaff 13, Sebastian 12, and Colborn 11. 

The Maroons will not display their wares at home again until 
February 24, when they entertain State Normal in a conference game that 
will close activities of the home front for the Southerners. 



■I : 

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on their student activity fees. 

Canadian-born, Kiss White studied at the Halifax Conservatory of 
Music and within a few years her fame had spread over Canada. She has 
sung for the American Negro Music Festival in Chicago, St. Louis and 
Detroit. Her current season includes concert tours of the United 
States and Canada and another New York Town Hall recital. 

....uit 









, 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service ""°""'- 1LL " ,ols 

LORENA DRUMMOND, SD. ■■■■^^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■H 



2-6-47 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. 6, -Plans for registration for'the 
spring term, which opens March 24, got into full swing at Southern 
Illinois Normal University here today as the general faculty considered 
reports of the registrar and deans for pre-registration procedure. 

All students now in school will pre-register starting Thursday, 
February 20) according to Dr. Lewis Maverick, chairman of the 
registration committee. They will consult with their faculty . .. . _ 
counselors and make out programs of their intended studies. 

"New students who plan to enter Southern for the spring term are 
also invited to take part in pre-registration," Dr. Maverick said. 
"Pre-registering may be important to them as it will enable them to 
reserve places in crowded classes. The Dean of Women and the Dean 
of Men will be happy to assist these new students, and to assign them 
to faculty counselors." 

uirff 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -A public concert by Fortia White, noted 
Negro contralto, has been arranged for February 14 in Shryock 
Auditorium at Southern Illinois Normal University, by the Gamma Kappa 
Omega chapter of Alpha Kappa alpha sorority. 

The University is participating in bringing Miss White by 
furnishing the auditorium and by financing a share of the expenses of 
the concert. In return, University students may attend the concert 
on their student activity fees. 

Canadian-born, Miss White studied at the Halifax Conservatory of 
Music and within a few years her fame had spread over Canada. She has 
sung for the American Negro Music Festival in Chicago, St. Louis and 
Detroit. Her current season includes concert tours of the United 
States and Canada and another New York Town Hall recital. 

...;Uli 









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^__^^^_____^^_ i Southern Illinois 

_ ^^^_ mmm ^^_^^_ Normal University 

Information Service CA " BO>,DA "- 1L " M ° 1S 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED, ■■■■■■■■■■■■UBnWHMHBBBBBMBMMUa 



2-6-47 

Carbondale, 111., Feb -Advice for the Southern Illinois veteran 
who wants to establish a business of his own comes from George Langdon, 
training officer at the U. S. Veterans Guidance Center at Southern 
Illinois Normal University. 

Langdon calls attention to the various services of the U. S. 
Department of Commerce as a major source for veterans who want to go 
into business for themselves, or who, already in business, find 
themselves faced with management or operational problems, 

"Manufacturers, for example, may obtain assistance on technical 
problems involving both production and materials," he explained. 
"Retailers, wholesalers, and service establishment operators may obtain 
assistance concerning sales, advertising, location, or other problems 
of a management or operational nature. 

"Moreover, if veterans are considering organizing a business of 
their own, they will be interested in knowing of the books on : . . ■■'..... 
establishing and operating various specific businesses which have been 
prepared by the Department of Commerce." A list of these books is 
available at the Guidance Center at Southern. 

Langdon also pointed out that the Department of Commerce has 
trained business specialists in their various offices who will be glad 
to discuss business problems with veterans, without charge. 

Offices of the U. S. Department of Commerce are maintained in 
Illinois at Chicago (357 U. S. Court House, George C. Payne, acting 
regional director, telephone HiiRrison 4700) and at Peoria (First 
National Bank Building, Room 531, 410 Main Street, Fred E. Tiddile, 
district manager). 

. M 






Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■^^^■^■■^^^^^1^^ 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. 3 - Complete text of a statement issued 
by the State Teachers College Board here Friday ni^ht, Feb. 7' 

"The State Teachers College Board has completed its investiga- 
tion of the 'adverse publicity' surrounding Southern Illinois 
Normal University. The investigation has been complete and 
thorough. 

"Each member of the Board v^ish.es to commend the fine spirit of 
cooperation of each witness who appeared to testify. It was through 
such cooperation that the Board was enabled to thoroughly 
investigate the problems and misunderstandings which created the 
unfavorable publicity at Southern. 

"It is a matter of public record, in a prior statement of this 
Board, that the general welfare and' progress of the university was 
always foremost in the minds of the members of the Board in making 
the decision to conduct the investigation. This attitude prevailed 
throughout the investigation itself and in reaching a decision. 

"The investigation revealed numerous incidents which brought 
about the adverse publicity. Some of the publicity, supported by 
facts, arose from misunderstandings either by the school 
administration," some members of the faculty, some members of the 
student body or others away from the campus. On the other hand, 
the greater part of the adverse publicity was due to rumors in 
no way supported by facts. 

"Testimony disclosed that the end of the war, the unprecedented 
enrollment which no one could anticipate, the period of adjustment 
following the change of the school administration and the transition 
into an accredited university and graduate school have all 
contributed to a period of unrest which required adjustment and 
readjustment. 

"Testimony was virtually unanimous in that the academic aims 
and standards of the school administration are excellent and that 

the faculty now at Southern ranks equal to or better than any 
facility the university has ever had. The Board, however, does not 






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overlook the fact that the university did lost some very capable 
faculty members, most of whom went to more promising and 
remunerative fields and their loss is regrettable. 

"Testimony disclosed the fact that the greater part of the 
adverse publicity centered around the first .months of the present 
administration and that the university is now progressing in its 
development in a commendable manner. 

"The housing shortage in and around thu university has caused 
much of the adverse publicity. The Board finds that the school 
administration was in no way responsible for the housing shortage. 
It is a problem that exists on practically every campus in the 
United States and it is one that the College Board and the school 
administration have made every possible effort to solve. 

"The Board recognizes the fact that in developing a teachers 
college into a university and the development of a graduate school, 
additional faculty members of hi'- r h rank must be secured and, in 
some instances, they must necessarily replace others whose academic 
rank is not so high. Some such changes have been made, and, if 
necessary, others may be made to this end. 

"In conclusion, the Board did find some just criticisms - minor 
in character - but not of sufficient importance to warrant any 
serious consideration of a change in administration. Therefore, 
the State Teachers Oollege Board calls upon all the friends of 
Southern Illinois normal University, including faculty, students, 
alumni and educators in the public schools to forget prejudices and 
personalities, rally to the support of Southern and rut forth all 
their energies in constructively helping to build a fine university 
which the people .of Southern Illinois so richly deserve." 









■ ■ 






Bi 



wmma B-— _____ Southern Illinois 

"" " Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■^■■■■■■■^■■■■i 



2-11-47 
Carbondale, 111*, Feb. -Frank G. Thompson of Lt . Vernon, chair- 
man of the State Teachers College Bo.-rd, which last week concluded its 
investigation of "adverse publicity" at Southern Illinois Normal 
University, Carbondale, will give two radio addresses Friday, Feb. 14, 
on "Southern as the Board v T iews It," it was announced here today. 
Thompson will speak 15 minutes over Station WCIL Carbondale, 
(1020 kc . ) at 5 p. m. He will give the same address to a night . 
audience over Station WJPF, Kerrin (1340 kc • ) at 7:45 p. m. 

The college board chairman said he would go more fully into the 
progress of Southern than was given in the boardis statement at the 
end of the investigation. 

m 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Students and faculty at Southern 
Illinois Normal University are this week visiting the University 
Health Service for x-ray tests in the Mobile C-Ray Unit sent out by 
the State Department of Public Instruction. 

vfrtffr 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Dates for Homecoming at Southern 
Illinois Normal University next fall have been set for October 24-2^ / 
Dr. Orville Alexander, director of alumni services, has announced. 

These dates coincide with the Southern vs. Northern football 
game on October 25, to be played here. 



.juiui jbuaa L iari ^ senior forward from Odin, and Oliver Shoaff, 



junior forward of T't. Camel, scored 10 and 8 points, respectively, 
as the Karoona had a cold night at the basket, 

Shoaff, r! Mr, One Hand", and Sebastian, "T'r. Two Hands" usually 
average about 20 points each for bhe Maroons cause, but two Staters, 
Klueh and foyer, each stole scoring honors with 14 ana IS points, 
respectively. 

This marks the end of the regular competition with Indiana State* 
However it is possible that the two teams may face each other a.^ain 
if the Scyamores get the call to the NIAB tourney in Kansas City. 

J'J'JUUJ. 
7,7/7,7/7/" 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



February, l-i 1947 



Carbondale, 111. Feb In official invitation to the National 

Athletic Inter-collegiate Basketball tournament from secretary- 
Treasurer E« S, Liston has been received by the Southern Illinois 
Normal University athletic department, Athletic Director C-lenn 
"Abe 1 ' T'artin announced. 

Although it was known that the Karoons would return to Kansas 
City this year to defend their champ ionshio, this invitation makes 
it official. 

As a result of their winning the NIAB crown la st year, the 
Southerners were honored by receiving the first invitation >*"his year.. 
' This will make the third time that the Haroons have received the 
invitation. The first time they made the trio in 1945, they were 
beaten by Loyola, the tea m that eventually won the tournament. Last 
year, the Southerners went on to take the crown themselves, winning 
five games in six days, and this year they will be defending their 
honors aga inst some of the finest post-war teams in the nation. 

The defending champs took it on the chin last Saturday night 

73-46 at the hands of Indiana State in Terre Laute. The Eoosiers 

a 
reaped /terrible revenge for the 57-54 trouncing hung on them earlier 

in the season by the I'aroons here in Carbondale. The Scyamores 

grabbed a 33-20 lead in the first half, and went on in the last 

canto to score 34 more tallies, while the hapless Maroons could 

garner only 26. 

John Sebastian, senior forward from Odin, and Oliver Shoaff, 
junior forward" of rt. Carmel, scored 10 and 8 points, respectively, 
as the Karoons had a cold night at the basket, 

Shoaff, n rr. One Hand ,: , and Sebastian, "I'r. Two Hands" usually 
average about 20 points each for the Maroons cause, but two Staters, 
Klueh and Payer, each stole scoring honors with 14 and 13 point:-, 
respectively, 

T-iis marks the end of the regular competition with Indiana State » 

However it is possible that the two teams may face each other apain 

if the Scyamores get the call to the NIAE tourncv in Kansas City. 

irwrnrrf 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale. Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^MI^^^M^MMM^^M^MMB 






2-11-47 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Blueprints for the site preparation of 
the new training school at Southern Illinois Normal University were 
received this week by the University from the State Jivision of 
architecture and Engineering* 

The huge roll of blueprints shows a general plan for future 
development of the campus, including a large area extending from Grand 
Avenue almost to Mill Street and from University avenue to Lake Street-- 
site of the new training school and other structures planned for future 
construction, and another large area south of the present campus, which 
is the site of the new power plant and shops, also an immediate 
building project. 

In the training school area are the training school itself, a 
small structure for training school for industrial arts shops, and the 
first half of a small education-administration building, all slated 
for immediate construction. Also shown are play areas, including a 
football-soccer-hockey-basketball field with bleachers; tennis-volley 
ball-basket ball field; and other play areas, as well as parking areas. 
Buildings shown for future construction are a building for handicapped 
children, a home economics building, a home economics practice house, 
a museum building, and a community center. 

The blueprints furnished by the State Division of Architecture and 
Engineering show details for such site-preparation work as grading, 
fencing plans and steps, walks, storm sewers, drainage, play areas, 
drinking fountains, lawn irrigation, and utility lines. 

University authorities have been notified that bids will soon be 
called on site preparation for the training school. 

The blueprints are in office of University President Chester F. 
Lay, and are proving a source of considerable interest to faculty, 
students and visitors. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



2-11-47 

Carbondale, 111., Fob. 12 -"Lincoln's sense of humor was not 
that of the clown,' 1 but "a part of his common sense equipment — a sense 
of the ludicrous, a sense of incongruity and absurdity in human foibles',' 

This analysis of the sense or humor of the great statesman whose 
birthday is being observed today, was given here last night by a 
Southern Illinois Normal University historian, Prof. E. G. Lentz, who 
is in charge of the University's collection of Lincolniana, the Clint 
Clay Tilt on Library. 

Professor Lenta spoke on the subject of Lincoln's sense of humor 
here before the Baptist Brotherhood* 

"The study of any of the numerous war portraits of Abraham Lincoln 
reveals a countenance of infinate sadness," Lentz pointed out. 

"To the deep melancholy which he had always striven to overcome 
throughout his life were added the tragic problems of a nation which 
would have overwhelmed any of lesser stature than Lincoln. He found 
moments of relief from the cares of state in a saving sense of humor 
which the men associated with him little understood." 

"When he appeared before his cabinet at a critical moment of the 
war between the States to discuss the proposed draft of men for service 
he came in chuckling with a copy of Artemas V/ard's latest delicious 
nonsense. To the consternation of the members of his cabinet he 
insisted on reading Vard's comment to the effect that he was perfectly 
willing as a patriotic duty to sacrifice all his wife's male relatives 
to save his country. But after a moments laugh Lincoln was profoundly 
serious as he addressed himself to the business of the moment. 

"Lincoln's sense of humor was not that of the clown; it was a part 
of his common sense equipment, a sense of the ludicrous, a sense of 
incongruity, and absurdity in human foilables. The very human Lincoln 
had a profound sense of humanity. 

"Thousand of stories have been attributed to him, many of them off 
color, which he never uttered. But he did have an almost inexhaustible 
fund of illustrative anedotes which he used to point up an important 
truth," 

He had a rare gift of repartee which carried with it no stin_; as 



-2- 

when he commented that if General McClelland did not intend to use 
the Army of the Potomac he would like to borrow it; or his comment to 
Stanton regarding a loss of a Brigadier General and several horses in 
a certain engagement that he could make a Brigadier General in five 
minutes but the loss of 110 horses was irreplacable: or his rer>ly to 
a request for a pass to Richmond before its fall that he had issued 
passes to 250,000 men none of which had been honored so far. 

"Before reaching the Presidency Lincoln acquired a considerable 
reputation as a story teller and was always the chief center of interest 
as lawyers o^nd judges foregathered in taverns on the Eighth Judicial 
Circuit of Illinois. If some of these stories were course as judged 
by modern standards of refinement it must be excused as the \ roauct of 
a raw frontier. 

;f It is related that on the occasion of the t rial of an important 
case which attracted a lar_e concourse of people one farmer of the 
region appeared with a deep rent -in his trousers which exposed too 
much of a rear view, as a joko some of the lawyers present passed 
around a subscription list for a fund to releuve the embarrassing 
situation. When the list came to Lincoln ho added his donation: 

To the end in view, 25c , ' :: 

" ii ii 

innr 



Dtti^GJi, — tiob U T Brien 

C " K30NDrtLE '— Bobbie Ingram, David H. Mcintosh, Willie D. Anderson, 
Virginia Sikkel, Nancy Gillespie, Paul Fursell, Georgia Gher, 
Ernest K. Limpus, James Farmer, Florence C. Crim, Q. D. Miakell, 
Zack Warren, and Rose Price. 

CARTERVILLE— Jack Ridley, and Frank F. Grover. 

CARLINVILLE— Roberta Wheeler, 

CENTRaLIa — Ada Marie Cover, and Sara Katherine Garrett. 



I 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



2-13-47 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -A new professional decree program in 
music has been set up by Southern Illinois Normal University, Dr. 
kaurits Kesnar, professor and chairman of the music department, has 
announced. 

Proposal to offer the degree, bachelor of science in music in the 
new College of Vocations and Professions, was made by the music ... 
department to the college dean, then submitted to the University 
curriculum committee, then to the president, and finally to the State 
Teachers College Board. 

Application has also been made to the National Association of 
School of Music for its ap^ roval of the new program, and a representa 
representative of the association will visit the Southern campus in 
April to make an official inspection, Dr. Kesnar said. 

The degree plan calls for a total of 192 quarter hours of work, 
including 47 in basic academic subjects, 9 in foreign language, 26 in 
elective subjects (total $2), and 110 hours in music subjects, including 
60 in theory, 12 in ensemble, 27 in applied music, and 11 in elective 

subjects in the music department. 

One-half credit each will be given for participation in the band, 
the chorus and the orchestra. All students musically able to do so 

will be required to enroll in two of these three ensemble groups. 

a total of 64 students are at present majoring in music, and are 
eligible to take work leading to the new degree. They include: 
BELLEVILLE— Carol Lee Werner 
BENTON— Obed Henderson 
BhEL3E--Bob O'Brien 
C. L KB0ND rt LE__ Bobbie ing ramj David H. Mcintosh, Willie D. Anderson, 

Virginia Sikkel, Nancy Gillespie, Paul Fursell, Georgia Gher, 

Ernest K. Limpus, James Farmer, Florence C. Crim, Q. D. Miskell, 

Zack Warren, and Rose Price. 
CARTER VILLE — Jack Ridley, and Frank F. Grover. 
CARLINVILLE— Roberta Wheeler. 
CENTRaLIa — Ada Marie Cover, and Sara Katherine Garrett. 



-2- 

CHRISTOPHER — Carl Luter, and Aliene Kauzlarich 

COBDEN— Alice Newhouse. 

COLLINSVTLLE — Melvin Siener 

CREaL SPRINGS— Yolande Byassee. 

DUwtUOIN- -Harrison Pallett . 

DO¥ELL--Mary Frederick . 

ELLERY — Kenneth G. Piercy. 

EAST ST. LOUIS— Arthur Relford, Tilford Brooks. 

FaIRFIE ID-MS ene Howey, Bill Green. 

HARLISBURG-- James E. Lands, and Cletus Jones. 

HERRIN — Eloise McCoy, Naomi Kuehner, and Ray Springs. 

JOHNSTON CITY— William Sanders. 

MARION — Tony Mazzara, and Charles D. Holmes. 

MT. VERlMJN — Fred L. Propst, and Joan Fay. 

MURPHYSBORO— Bill Ledbetter. 

METROPOLIS— Charles B. Ablett. 

Oi-IrHa — Dorris Cox. 

RUSHVILLE— Marlin G. Bunfill 

SaLEM — Lanora Sills 

SPaRT*.— Andrew Culp, and Ivan B. Swan 

STaUIm'TJN — Jerry Schnaar. 

ST. ELMO— Allen Seward. 

ST. LOUIS— Alard Hamilton. 

VaLI^R— Lloyd Higgerson 

VALIEYER— Gaillord Krewer. 

WIENNh-^ Harold L. Gray. 

WATERLOO — Raymond Hoeddel, and Normal Rodenberg. 

WE STFIELD— Charlotte Fender. 

WEST FRANKFORT — Patricia Fields, Paul L. Margelli, Bridgett Gillespie, 

and Evelyn Burpo. 
WOOD RIVER— Warren J. Elliott. 
XENlA — Kathryn I. Middle ton. 

...nt 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - ILLINOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^ ^^^^^™ — ^ — 



Hi 

I 



2-13-47 
Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Olaf Christiansen, director of the 



■i 
i 






fames 3t. 01af T s Choir, Northf ield, Minn., will serve as guest 
conductor for the sixth annual Choral Clinic sponsored by the Southern 
Illinois Normal University music department here Feb. 22, Floyd V. 
Wakeland, clinic director, has announced. 

The St. Olaf Choir is now on tour, and presented one of its 
concerts in Chicago Feb. 6, Wakeland said. 

Twenty-six Southern Illinois high schools have entered choruses 
for the one-day clinic, and participation is expected to approximate 
700 boys and girls. 

On the evening of Feb. 22, after an entire day T s study and 
rehearsal, the 700 youthful singers will be presented in a public 
concert in Shryock Auditorium on the University campus. 

Mr. Christiansen received his Bachelor of Music degree from St. 
Olaf College in 1925, and the degree of Master of Sacred Music from 
the Union Seminary in New York City. After spending a year in New 
York City in private study he went to Flint Michigan where he taught 
in the public schools for 3 years. His experiences in school music 
education range from junior high to college and university teaching. 

From Flint he went to Oberlin Conservitory of Music where he was 

choral director for 12 years, until he returned in 1941 to St. Olaf 

College where he is chairman of the department of music and directs 

the St. Olaf Lutheran Choir which was founded by his father, F, Melius 

Christiansen. 

V 
Mr. Christiansen has taught summer school sessions at the 

universities of Missouri, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Michigan. With his 

father, and Neil Kjos, he was co-founder of the Christiansen Choral 

School which serves as concentrated, special course for church, public 

school, and college choral directors. 



■a 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

lorena drummond, ed. ^^^^^^^tm^^mi^^^^m^^am 



Carbondale, 111., Feb,. -After a weeks rest, the Southern 
Illinois Normal University Maroons will hit the road for a two game 
trip beginning with a Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference tilt 
with the rejuvinated Western Teachers at Macomb on Friday, and then 
dropping in on the Millikin Big Blues in Decatur on Saturday. 

Coach Lynn Holder's men will be looking for their fifth victory 
in as many conference starts when they tangle with the Leathernecks, 
When the two squads met on the Carbondale floor, the Southerners ■ 
managed to grab a 43-42 decision. However, since then the Westerners 
have begun to show why they were considered a threat in the loop 
before the season begun. Their latest conquest came at the expense of 
the Easterners, who were also considered as a strong contender in the 
conference. 

With Millikin, it will be a case of revenue since the Big Blue 
handed the local capers a 52-47 lacing on Southern campus last Jan. 20, 
which by the way, was the Maroons first home loss this season and only 
their second in over two and one-half season. 

Holder has his forwards Johnny Sebastian of Odin, "Mr, Two Hands", 
and Oliver Shoaff of Mt. Carmel, "Mr. One Hand ;; , ready to go against 
these two foes, although Shoaff has been complaining of an ankle injury. 

Six-foot four-inch center Q,uentin Stinson of Eldorado, gurads 
Gene Hall of Galatia, and Bob Colborn of Flora will probably comprise 
the rest of the five to take the floor in both games. However, Leedio 
Cabutti of Johnston City and Sam Milosevich of Zeigler will probably 
see plenty of action before the trip is over. 

The Southerners do not have a iiome game until February 24, when 
they meet State Normal in a conference game that will close the home 
season for the Maroons. 

iTftvv 






Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Release Saturda; 



icr.le, 111 . , 'eb. 



-- :, J"usic Is Yc on radio i Lon 
"OIL, Carbondale, v;ill ?e music by vocalist >raine Carrington 
Ox Carbondale and a brass sextette from Soi b : Illi ois fTormal 
University • 

Members of the go tette are Ada Cover, Centralia, first 
trumpet; Obed Henderson, "■e:i'con, second brum et; Jerry '//ill lams, 
Salem, French horn; Kathryn raddleton, :enia, baritone; Tilford 
Brooks, E. St. Louis, trombone/ I'el Siener, Gollinsville, buba. 

: r ene Eowey of Fairiield will conduct the sextette, who are 
all members of the University band. Vernell Baird of Elkville will 



announce . 

Tusic Is Yours" can be heard over h'CIL (1020 k.c.) 
February 17, from 2:15 to 2:50 p. in. 



'onday, 



JL Jl J I 

7/ tt rr 



lelease ' 'onday 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. --Can pus news by four Southern Illinois 
formal University students will nake up the '"edncs^ay University 
program over station 7/GIL in Carbpndele. 

Students who will participate on the program :.re Fred 
Criminger, Dupo; Fred Senters, flora; Bob iTcDowell, E • St, Louis, 
J'ary hr.th Taylor, C eal Springs, rr.c announcer ? alph Lane, Eldorado. 

The newsca'st can he heard February IB at 2:15 :>.m« 



.". .." M 

ri ,. ir 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. --The "I'arian Anderson 
Portia IThite, will he -presented in concert at Soi 
~ T \ Liver .v. x t- Friday evening, February 14, at G p.m. 

Miss -Thite's appearance here is sponsored joint 
Omega e" apte] of Alpha Kappa Alpha, national d s 
University 7, entertainment com ittee. Because of he 
participation, students will he admitted to the core 
fcudent activity tlchets. 

A contralto, Hiss ,:iite has appeared in cv:o Tov: 
has been heard in Detroit, St. Louis, and Cj 
e b s appeared as soloist at the promenade Symphon 
Toronto, Canada, which were conducted by Andre h'oste 



of Canada," ] 


iss 


rn 11 1 1 no i s ho rr. a 1 


1 _T t • a Ks 


ma 


orority, a nd 


t he 


versity' s 




on their 




n Hall r< 


s 


o. 




y Concerts in 




lanetz. 





J!. ." 4' 



Southern Illinois 

■ 
Normal University 



Information Service 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. I 



2-17-47 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. -The Foxhole Ballet, a group of dancers 
which came into being during the war to entertain soldiers overseas, 
will be presented in Shryock Auditorium on the Southern Illinois 
Normal University campus by the Community Concert Association Friday 
evening, Feb. 21. 

This is the second production on the Community Concert 
Association series this year, the first being Vronsky and Babin, duo- 
pianists, last fall. 

The Foxhole Bullet is directed by Grant Mouradoff , leader and 
chief choreographer, former leading solo dancer with the Metropolitan 
Opera Association and later with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlon. 

Ballerinas are Sonia Woicikowska, Zoya Leporska, Gines Richardson 
and Rosa Holland. Other dancers are Mr. i-.ouradoff , George Tomal and 
Richard Thomas. The group is accompanied by Victoria Crandall and 
Moreland Kortkamp, pianists. 

Since the University entertainment fund contributes annually to 
the Community Concert Association and provides auditorium facilities 
for the concerts, University students are able to attend all concerts 
on their student activity tickets. 

ffirw 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Two food demonstrations will be 
sponsored by the Southern Illinois Normal University home economics 
department Friday, Feb. 21, Mrs. Mary Louise Barnes, assistant 
professor of home economics. 

The first will be given at 10 a. m. , on ''The Modern Refrigerator 
and Its Use, ?? featuring recipes for rolls, pie and an attractive salad. 

The second will be held at 2 p. m. , demonstrating an entire meal 
prepared in the broiler. 

I iss Celeste Sullivan, home economist with the Illinois Power 
Company, Belleville, will conduct the demonstrations, which will be h 
held in Main Building 110. Uhile planned primarily for home economics 
students, University housemothers, and student wives, the 
demonstrations are open to the public. 

m 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Even if the v4 l/2 million dollar 
budjet which Southern Illinois Normal University is requesting from 
the General Assembly £oes through, the cost per student will still be 
reasonable, it is apparent from a report received here from Charles G. 
Lanphier, coordinator for the five State teachers colleges and normal 
universities. 

On the basis of the budget requested, the cost for one student 
for the biennium 1947-49 is estimated at { 1,435, compared to £..1,706 
at Illinois State Normal University, (1,446 at Northern Illinois 
State Teachers College, f. 1,417 at Western Illinois State Teachers 
College, and £ 1,3#7 at Eastern Illinois State Teachers College. 

These estimates are based on the university r s reauested ,• ■ 

appropriation for "general Revenue and Income Fund— Educational". 
On the basis of all funds requested, the cost per student is 
estimated at £,1,877 at Normal, ^.1,673 at Southern, .'.,1,571 at Northern, 
£1,511 at Western, and •..1,505 at Eastern. 

- I - d . . 

ffuirff 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. 1& -Jack H. Bishop of Carterville, 
Southern Illinois Normal University graduate student, is in Washington 
today to attend the first White House reception since pre-war days. 

Bishop, son of Congressman C, W. ("Runt") Bishop, was 
accompanied by his wife and baby. 

His invitation from President and Mrs. Truman has attracted 
considerable attention on the campus. Bishop attended the 1941 
reception, the last held by President and Mrs. Roosevelt before the 
war interrupted the long tradition. 

ihrff 



I 

i 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. I 



", 



" 






Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



2-17-47 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Guest directors for the annual Choral 
Clinic for high school songsters sponsored by the music department of 
Southern Illinois Normal University have included many of the nation's 
most famous choral conductors. 

This year, guest director for the clinic, to be held Friday, 
February 22, is Olaf Christiansen, director of the famous St. Olaf's 
Choir of Northfield, Minn. 

Trie first year of the clinic, the choruses were directed by David 
S. iiclntosh and Floyd V. Wakeland of the University music faculty. 
Succeeding clinics were directed by Dr. Howard Kelsey, choral director 
and organist at Washington University; Nobel Cain, director of the 
Chicago A capella Choir; and Peter Tkach, general supervisor of music 
in the Minneapolis schools and a noted composer. 

The one-day clinic will start at 9:15 Saturday morning. A 
dinner-conference for the directors of the various high school 
choruses participating in the clinic, principals of these high schools 
and their wives, will be held at 5:30 in the University cafeteria. A 

public concert by the massed choruses will be given in Shryock 
Auditorium Saturday evening at 7:30. 

### 

Carbondale, 111., ffeb. -Two lecture-forums will highlight the 
two-day Egyptian Speech Festival at Southern Illinois Normal University 
Feburary 28—1 larch 1, according to Dr. P. M. Larson, chairman of the 
speech department. 

One of the forums will be at the dinner session February 25, and 
will be led by Dr. Willis G. Swartz, professor of government and 
chairman of the graduate studies committee at the University. Subject 
of this forum will be "U.S.-U.S. S.h. HjiWTIQNS • " 

A second forum is being arranged for the evening of Feb. 23. 

Approximately 150 colleges of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, 
Tennessee, Arkansas, and Missouri have been invited to participate in 
the festival. 












■M 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE ' 1LLlwo ' s 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Leland P. "Doc" Lingle, truck and cross- 
country coach at Southern Illinois Normal University, was the guest 
speaker last honday night at Johnston City's Father and Son Banquet, 
sponsored by the Baptist Brotherhood of that city. Over 1.50 fathers 
and sons heard Lingle speak on the subject "The Youth of Today — The 
Citizen of Tomorrow. 1 ' 

JU.JUI 

uinnr 

Carbondale, 111., Feb, -Jack Dempsey's Adam Hat Sports Trophy, 
which is awarded to the outstanding athlete for enthusiasm, . ... 
sportsmanship, team spirit, athletic ability, and accomplishments, 
was received today by Glenn "Abe" Martin, athletic director at Southern 
Illinois Normal University, the athletic department has announced. 

The trophy is about two feet high, with a dark base, and a _old 
colored body. On top of the trophy is the figure of an athlete 
holding the laurel wreath of victory. 



The committee for awarding the trophy has not been selected yet, 
the athletic director announced. 

fffflT 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Over 50 men have reported to Track 
Coach Leland P. "Doc" Lingle, to compete in the Southern Illinois 
Normal University varsity track program, the athletic department has 
announced. The men are working out in the gymnasium and on the track. 

However, many more are expected to report when the current basket- 
ball season is over, and next term is under way, Lingle said. 

'L'i II 



1^ ^^^ ^^_ ^_^^_ _ Southern Illinois 
[1 Normal University 

:l Information Service CARBO,,DAlE ' IlL1NO,s 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Release Thursday 



Carbondale, 111., Feb, — ''Southern Comes Galling" vd.ll present 
Miss Lucy K. T ;/oody, chairman of the home economics department of 
Southern Illinois Normal University, in a talk called ''The Family 
Wardrobe: Its Selection and How to Preserve It." 

'"southern Comes Calling" is one of five daily radio programs 
presented by the University over station UCIL, Carbondale, (1020 k.c») 
Monday through Friday from 2:15 to 2:30 p.m. Each features a 
different type of program. 

Miss E'oody can be heard Friday, February 21. Robert Lay of 
Vienna will announce. 

Release Friday 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. — Washington f s birthday will be observed 
on Southern Illinois Normal University's '''Education Time" radio 
broadcast with an appropriate program by the ''Education Time" regular 
staff. 

Washington reminiscences will be presented by Bob Curtis of 
Carbondale, announcer; Mary Beth Huss, Sparta, story lady; and two 
recently added staff members, Howard Coins of kcLeansboro, vocalist, 
and Rose Price of Carbondale, pianist. 

"Education Time" can be heard over stations \ r J. E, Herrin and 
'E3.„, Harrisburg, Friday, February 21, from 2:30 to 3:00 p.m. 



I 



He - discussed some of the newer methods of counselling high school 
students in order to encourage them to make wise choices of vocations 
and to meet their personal problems most effectively. 

m 









■MB 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. l£ -Dr. Chester F. Lay, president of 
Southern Illinois Normal University, will attend a dinner at Normal 
today which will be given in honor of the nintieth anniversary of the 
founding of Illinois State Normal University, oldest state-supported 
higher educational institution in Illinois. 

The dinner will be served at the country club at 6:30 p. m. , and 
Gov. Dwight H. Green will be the principal guest speaker. 

Dr. Lay, who is an alumnus of the university, has been invited 
to return as an honor guest for this occasion. 

infif 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. -A delegation from the administrative 
staff of Southern Illinois Normal University will attend a meeting of 
the Council on Higher Education to be held at Normal on Wednesday, 
Feb. 19. 

The delegates who will go to the meeting are: President Chester 
F. Lay; Dr. T. W. Abbott, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences; Dr. Henry J. Rehn, dean of the College of Vocations and 
Professions; Dr. Eugene R. Fair, dean of the College of Education; 
Dr. Willis G. Swartz, chairman of the Graduate Studies Committee; 
and Raymond H. Dey, director of Extension and Placements Services. 

The council, which meets semi-annually, is composed of the six 
state-supported educational institutions, and has for its purpose the 
consideration of mutual problems and areas of cooperation. 



\ , 



ii ii if 



livil^ 



He discussed some of the newer methods of counselling high school 
students in oraer to encourage them to make wise choices of vocations 
and to meet their personal problems most effectively, 

m 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



2-20-47 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Harold C. Hines, instructor in band at 
Southern Illinois Normal University, will serve as guest soloist for 
a series of concerts presented jointly by the high school bands of 
Carbondale, Anna- Jonesboro, and Murphysboro. 

The first concert will be presented at Anna- Jonesboro Friday 
evening, February 21. Mr. Hines will give a cornet solo, accompanied 
by the massed bands, and will also play with the bands for other 
sections of the concert. 

The Carbondale Community High School band is directed by Wayne 
Reynolds, the Murphysboro band by Leland Grizzell, and the Anna- 
Jonesboro band by Keith Whetstone. 

U I, tl ,1 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Br. Marshall S. Hiskey, acting dean of 
men at Southern Illinois Normal University Thursday night addressed 
the Finckneyville Parent-Teachers Association on the occasion of its 
founders' day banquet. 

Dr. Hiskey, citing the jamming of colleges and universities by 
returning veterans, called attention to the fact that many high school 
graduates who normally would attend college, may be unable to do so 
because of the overcrowded conditions. He pointed out that the high 
schools therefore have £ greater than normal obligation to prepare 
these young people, both vocationally and spiritually, for satisfactory 
living. 

He discussed some of the newer methods of counselling high school 
students in order to encourage them to make wise choices of vocations 
and to meet their personal problems most effectively. 

m 






mm 



MlHHB^rti 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



7-20-47 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Dr. Thomas F. Barton, professor and 
chairman of the geography department at Southern Illinois Normal 
University, has accepted a summer position at the University of •-...'. 
Nebraska where he will teach both graduate and undergraduate work. 

Dr. Barton has long been interested in educational geography, and 
has written both articles and book reviews on the subject. His latest 
article on this subject/ was T? Teaching Soil in the Lower Grades, iT 
published in the January issue of The Journal of Geography . 

He keeps in practical touch with public school methods by teaching 
both conservation and methods courses in University high school. 

Dr. Barton will return to the Southern faculty in the fall. 

■if)rrl- 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. -A questionnaire from a educational 
association this week sent Southern Illinois Normal University 
researchers scouring the records — to find out the order and tenure of 
the school's seven presidents! 

Everybody knew their names, but nobody seemed to know the exact 
order in which they held office and nobody knew the exact years of 
their administrations. 

Finally, the information was found in the Alumni Directory , 
compiled by W. G. Cisne, professor emeritus and former director of I ^e 
Placement Service. 

The list: Robert Allyn, 1874-18?2, retired; John Hull, 1392-1893, 
resigned to accept another position; Harvey W. Everest, 1693-1897, 
resigned because of poor health; Daniel B. Parkinson, 1897-1913, 
retired; ;Henry W. Shryock, 1913-1935, deceased; Roscoe Pulliam, 1935- 

1944, deceased; and Chester F. Lay, 1945 . 

it 



MM 



Mi 




Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



2-20-47' 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Cancellation of four schools leaves the 
enrollment for the Choral Clinic to be held at Soutnern Illinois 
Normal University Saturday, Feb. 22, at 539, Floyd V. Wakeland, clinic 
director, has announced. 

Enfield, Nashville, Zeigler and Coulterville high schools have 
withdrawn, leaving 22 schools scheduled to participate in the one-day 
clinic, plus the University T s Mixed Chorus. 

The 539 high school singers will study all day under the direction 
of Olaf Christiansen, director of the famous St. Olaf Choir of 
Northfield, Minn., who has been secured by the University music 
department as guest conductor for the occasion. 

In the evening, at 7:30 o'clock, the massed chorus composed of all 
the students participating in the clinic will present a public concert 
in Shryock Auditorium on the University campus. 

The directors of the various high school choruses will be guests 

at a dinner at the University cafeteria at 5:30 p. m. Saturday. 

The schools which will participate in the clinic, together with 
the number of singers entered, and their respective directors, are as 

follows: Anna-Jonesboro, 16, Keith Whetstone; Ashley, 10, Paul Daniels; 

Benton Twp., 65, Mrs. Betty Mercer Frailey; Carbondale Comm., 21, 

Wayne Reynolds. 

Carrier Mills, 17, Miss Mary Jarvis; Carterville, 43, Miss Irene 



out: wiTO out a Few minutes left in the game, and received a tremendous 
ovation from the approximately 1,800 fons who wore jam- packed in the 

gym for the season's finale, 

rj1his loo P title was the second consecutive crown for the "Junior 
Kids" end their second in history. After another conference 

game at DeKalb next Saturday, the Faroons will have a weeks rest 

before traveling to Kansas City where they will defend their National 

Intercollegiate Athletic Saskotoall crown. 

., . mm 



■1H 



-2- 

Watson; Christopher, 43, Edwin Cockrum; DuQuoin, 14, Miss Flora Carr; 

Fairfield, 3, Miss Corine Jessop; Gorham, 10, Edward Harn; 
Harris ourg, 40, John Schork; Herrin, 3&, Glenn Gablanski. 

Johnston City, 20, Herbert Johnson; Marian, 3, Jean McCornick; 
McLeansboro, 15, Muriel Newcomj Mt« Vernon, 15, VJ. H. Beckmeyer. 

Murphysboro, 7, Leland Grizzell; New Athens, 34, Miss Edith 
Lindauer; Salem, 35, Miss Charlotte Holt. 

Waterloo, 9, Miss Ruth Kichert; West Frankfort, 24, Franklin 
LeFevre; University Chorus, 59, F. V. Wakeland. 



out ivi en ■■mt a rev; minutes left :.n the -ame, and received a tremendous 
ovation from the approximately 1,800 fans who were jam-pneked in the 
gym for^thc season's finale, 

WM* ^i!ff l0 °^ L it: t e Was thc scconcl consecutive crown for the "Junior 
££* j£ *t,i l T seconci i« h-istory. After another conference 

before t^i 1 ? ne ; :t Saturday, the Faroona will have 8 webks rest 
Tnt^omifl? 1 J n S to Kansas city where they will defend their Wati. 
lnt..rcollo G iafcc Athletic Ifeakotball crown. 



.onal 



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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CAR,OMDA "' "• L1M ° 18 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■^■■■■■■■^■■^■■^■i 



February 25, 1947 

Carvondale, 111, Feb* -The Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Basketball crown belonged to southern Illinois Formal University 
today by virtue of their 88-53 trouncing of State Normal Fonday night 
on the Carbondale hardwood* 

Johnny "yr. Two Hands" Sebastian, ace forward from Odin, was 
high point nan, as he peppered the nets with Z2 points. This was 
Sebastian's last game before the local crowds, since the yaroons 
closed the hone season with this game. 

This tilt was a fitting clima;: to the career of Gene Hall, 
senior guard of Oalatia, ^nd Sam yilosevich of Zeigler, as w/ell as 
Sebastian, Hall played one of his best game of the season last night, 
with magnificent rebounding, setting his mates up with shots, besides 
scoring 11 points on his own* 

yilosevich, although he did not play very long, managed to rack 
up one free throw, besides doing some fine rebounding work, Oliver 
"Fr. One Hand" Shoaff, junior forward from yt. Carmel, held his own 
by racking up 21 points. Center yuentin Stinson of Eldorado, came 
through with 13 points, and guard Bob Colborn of Flora accounted for 
-y points. 

However, Sebastian was the main attraction. Fens and teammates 
alike sensed that "yr. Two Hands' 1 was nearing an individual conference 
scoring record, and his mates did their best to let hin shoot. 

State Formal was determined that no scoring records were going 
to be set against them, and set two men guarding Sebastian, He fouled 
out with but a few minutes left in the game, and received a tremendous- 
ovation from the approximately 1,800 fans who were jam-packed in the 

gym for the season's finale, 

r?1 * lis loo P title was the second consecutive crown for the "Junior 
7hiz Fids" cpS. their second in history. After another conference 
game at DeKalb next Saturday, the yaroons will have a weeks rest 
before traveling to Kansas city where they will defend their National 
Intercollegiate Athletic Saskotball crown* 

W 






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••' "' 



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^^^——^ m ^^^^^^ mm ^ Southern Illinois 

■ Noimal University 

Information Service CA " OKDA "' """°™ 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■IIMBMIHBBMHm 



February 27* 1947 

Carbondale, III., Feb. -Johnny Sebastian, senior forward 
from Odin, has been voted the outstanding basketball player of the 
season at Southern Illinois Normal University, by his teammates, 
Athletic Director, Glenn "Abe" Martin has announced. 

Sebastian, a two handed set-shot artist who has earned the 
nickname of "Mr. Two Hands" ? recently scored 32 points in a single 
game against State Normal. This game, which brought the Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference title to Southern, was the last 
home game of the season, besides being the final home game in 
Sebastian's career,. 

Sebastian is now in line for the Harvey S e al award, which is 
presented by Western Illinois State Teachers College annually to the 
outstanding Basketball player of the conference. 

Carbondale, 111. Feb. -Don Sheffcr of Zeigler, and Gene 
Stotlar of Pinckneyville, both members of last year's National Inter- 
collegiate Athletic Basketball champs, the Southern Illinois Normal 
University Maroons, have been selected for the current all-state 
Independent cage squad, Athletic Director Glenn "Abe" Martin has been 
informed. The Independent tourney was held in Peoria last week. 

Sheffer, who was selected as the outstanding player in the 
tournament is coaching at Piano high school, and his guided his cagers 
to the conference championship and two tournament crowns in this, his 
first season. 

Stotlar is enrolled at Southern, but did not try out for the 
varsity quintet this year. 



,..•■.■ ■■.,■■.■ '-.,) :■■ ■. - ■ ■■'.. • v. ;■"• 'i ' ■>■•■ •■ "- • • '■•'"' 



' 






Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



February 27, 1947 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Glenn "Abe" Martin, aathletic 
director at Southern Illinois Normal University, will atte d a meeting 
of the Illinois Basketball Association in Bloomington on Friday, he 
has announced. 

This group will arrange plans for a playoff t ournament to see 
which team besides Southern will represent the State of Illinois in 
the National Intercollegiate Athletic Basketball tournament in Kansas 
City on March 10. 

Four teams will vie for the chance to represent the 16th '« 
District, which is the entire state of Illinois. T$e four teams will 
be comprised of the winner of the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference, the College Conference of Illinois, the Pioneer ( 
Conference, and one other team. Since Southern annexed the IIAC 
crown, the second place hold, rs will enter the tourney. 

### 



in the IIAC scoring race. Thus, Holder's charges should be able to 
more than hold their own against any opposition that might be floored 
against them. 

After the tournament, the cagers will begin their spring 
vacations, and hang up the Maroon and White uniforms for the season. 

.... tf§ 



Hi 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



February 27, 1947 

Carbondale, Ill«, Feb. -With the conference championship 
safely tucked away in their books, the Southern Illinois Normal 
University "Junior Whiz Kids" will close tho regular season Saturday 
night against Northern Teachers in DeKalb* 

The Maroons will be getting into shape to defend their laurels 
at Kansas City on March 10, when they will lay their National Inter- 
collegiate Athletic Basketball crown on the line for teams from all 
over the nation to shoot at. 

The Southerners now hold the record of 17 wins and nine losses, 
and if they win this final tilt at DeKalb, they will have the dis- 
tinction of winning twice as many as they have lost. 

The following ten men will probably take the long trip for the 
Maroons: Johnny Sebastian of Odin, Oliver Shoaff of Mt. Carmel, 
Wuentin Stinson of Eldorado, Gene H all of Galatia, Bob Colborn of 
Flora, Sam Milosevich of Zeigler, Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City, 
Boyd Wilson of Fairfield, Charles Goss of Marion, and either John 
Ruzich of Johnston City or John Goss of Marion. 

Northern is always a tough prospect in their own gymnasium, but 
the pressure will be off the local quint, and a victory would not be 
too surprising for Caoch Lynn Holder's charges. 

If the Maroons win this one, they will close the season with the 
conference record of seven wins and one defeat, but a loss will give 
them only a six and two record. 



i — 






in the IIAC scoring race. Thus, Holder's charges should be able to 
more than hold their own against any opposition that might be floored 
against them. 

After the tournament, the cagers will begin their spring 
vacations, and hang up the Maroon and White uniforms for the season. 



B 



mmmn 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. BBHBIMHHBBHBHMiMHMNHHHBBHH 



Carbondale, 111,, March - With final exams out of the way, eleven 
men will entrain on Sunday morning for Kansas City, as the Southern 
Illinois Normal University Maroons prepare to defend their National 
Intercollegiate Athletic Basketball title on Monday in the twin citre.- 

The eleven men, destined to carry Southern's fate are Johnny 
Sebastian, senior from Odin, Oliver Shoaff , junior from Mt. Carmel, 
Quentin Stinson, sophomore from Eldorado, Gene Hall, senior from 
Galatia, Bob Colborn, freshman from Flora, bam Milosevich, senior 
from Zei_ler, Leedio Cabutti, junior from Johnston City, Charles 
Goss, sophomore from Marion, John Goss, freshman from Marion, and 
Jack Long, freshman from Flora, 

The Southerners, who have been pointed for all season by opposing 
teams because of their title, do not even know who their first round 
opponents will be, since many of the teams are finishing their 
elimination tournaments on Saturday night, only a few 01 the 32 
squads are known. Some of these are, besides Southern, Loras 
College of Iowa, Kansas State Teachers of Emporia, Kansas, and 
Indiana State of Terre Haute, who were runners-up in last years 
tourney. 

The Maroons, although their record of 1$ wins against nine re- 
verses is not too impressive, can point to the fact that they have 
taken the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Championship, 
a repeat from last year, and have met some of the top teams in the 
country this season. 

Although Coach Lynn Holder's men have met defeat nine times, 
they have scored over SO points in their past two games, and 
Sebastian, Stinson, and Shoaif place one, two, and four, respectively, 
in the IIAC scoring race. Thus, Holder's charges should be able to 
more than hold their own against any opposition that might be floored 
against them. 

After the tournament, the cagers will begin their spring 
vacations, and hang up the Maroon and White uniforms for the season, 

. //# 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■^^■■■■IMHHHHHHHHHHB^^HH. 



Carbondale, 111. March -Johnny ,! Mr. Two Hands" ^ecastian, brilliant 
forward at Southern Illinois Normal University from Odin, 111., led 
the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference in scoring this 
season according to the official conference basketball statistics. 

Sebastian nosed out his teammate, Quentin Stinson, six-foot 
four-inch center from Eldorado, by 33 points, as Sebastian had 134 
points to Stinson 's 101. 

Bob Olsen of Eastern took third place with 97 markers, while 

©liver "Mr. Two Hands" Shoaff, junior forward from Mt. Carmej , 
took fourth place for the Maroons with 92 points, 

Sebastian, besides being the top scorer, was voted the most 
valuable player on the Southern squad by his teammates, and is in 
line for the Harvey Seal award, which is awarded annually to the 
most valuable player in the loop. 

Sebastian averaged 16.15 points per game in looj play, while 
Stinson ' s average was 12.63, and Shoaff 's was 11.50. The Maroons 
will close the season after they attempt to defend their NIAB 
crown in Kansas City from March 10-15. 



averap of 43 per county. In the 24 counties of Southern Illinois 

Lver5/S r *f nta Southern- a"«tenaion area" there are 8?0 or ' 
averse Ox 34 per county." ■ 

kvei^rfm h 1 ^ ® x 1 tens 1 1 ? n ?ro G rain, Dey declared, Southern is, making 
£ ;, L : ,. fc ° help alleviate the critical ahortage of teachers, 

U v a of?.^rH nt ? r L tea ^ erS ' in thia area « Si * of th ? 22 Curses 
af S,iL d6al dlrectl 3- with the elementary field, and many 
of the others are courses of value to the elementary teacher. 

Courses arc now uncier way at the followinr ember-- /vrna 51 
;!;;' :lrol i^ : ton, slj Cairo, 47; CeSSr2lli? 47| &ter' 33J 
£„£ I ' • SFt '•''' - ast st - Louis. 51; Mwardaville. 66: t-'arrlsbure 75- 
ft^i^fe 128; £ri Ssa , 23 A K0Unds - 58 ' «• virS^ift sEhSillS; 
,.^, 1 -..L-,:v v i: le ' <9; Salem, 19j Shawneetown, 40; IVatertoo 43; 













Ki 




Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND. ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3-4-47 

Carbondale, 111., I.?arch -Enrollment in extension courses 
conducted in Southern Illinois communities by Southern Illinois 
Formal University continues to "row, as 976 p eople are now talcing 
the c curses in 1C different towns, 3ayaonc! I~. Dey, director of 
e :•: t c n e i on, r e o o r t s . 

The current enrollment is almost ICO above that during the fall 
tern., thus reversing the usual trend of a lower winter enrollment, 
due to bad travel conditions. 

Southern is currently conducting 22 extension courses in 19 
centers, located in 15 Southern Illinois counties, 

The increase this year is attributed by I'r. Dey to the recent 
announcement by the State Examining Board that riaid enforcement is 

to he carried out of the state law requiring each teacher possessing 
lens than two "errs of college credit to earn five semesters of such 
credit before September, 1947, Those teachers who fail to meet this 
requirement will not have their emergency certificates renewed, he 
p ointed out. 

Southern's extension courses permit teachers who lack the required 
educational training to take college credit work in classes conducted 
in their own home communities, while carrying on their regular 
teaching Jobs, I'r. Dey explained, 

|' Southern Illinois has fewer teachers per county who are teaching 

under these emergency certificate: than does the state as a whole," 

Dey said, ".There are 4,336 teachers in the State of Illinois who 

hold these certificate:.:, representing emergence oerrriits to teach with 

,less than the standard amount of college training. This is an 

average of 43 per county. In the 24 counties of Southern Illinois, 

Which represents Southern 1 s n extension area" there are S70, or an 
average of 34 per county." 

Throug] its extension program, Dey declared, Southern is, making 
every effort to help alleviate the critical shortage of teachers, 

particularly elementary teachers, in this area. Six of the 22 courses 
currently offered deal directly with the elementary field, and many 
of the others are courses of value to the elementary teacher. 

Courser are now under way at the following centers: Arna, 51 

.moiled; Benton, 25; Cairo, 47; Centralia, 47; Chester, 55; 
fchristopher. East St. Louis, 51; Edwardsville, 66; Earrisburg, 75; 
Johnston City, 123; I'arissa, 23; Kounds, 53; rt, Vernon, BO; Nashville, 
40; Pinchneyville, 40; Salem, 19; Shawnee town, 40; Waterloo, 43; 
; urohysboro, 54, 



■ 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3-4-47 

C .: :1c, 111., har . .- its fro-.; 12 colleges of Illinois 
and neighboring states gathered here at Southern Illinois Normal 
University last w eek-end for a two- day Egyptian Speech Festival. 

Southern speech students, host for the two-day affair, garnered 
five first places and 9 seconds z * thirds^ a total of 13. Runner-up 
was Lake Porest College with 4 firsts and ;placings, likewise a 
total of 13. 

Colleges participating in the event were C-reenville College, 
Eureka College, Principia College, lake Forest College, Eastern 
Illinois State Teachers College, Illinois State ITomal University, all 
of Illinois; St. Louis University, Southwest Nissouri Baptist College, 
Webster Grove College, Rockhurst College, all of rissouri; Murray 
State Teac" ers College, Kentucky; and Southwestern University, Tenn. 

Winners in the various events were: 

Ten's original oratory-- Ralph V'idener of Eastern, first; tie for 
second, Russell Tomlinson of Lake Forest and John Swift of Southwestern. 

Women* s original oratory—Barhara Hahm of Lake Forest, first; 
•Anne Allen of Formal, second; Rosemary Woolard (Energy), Southern , 
third. 

Ten's oratorical declamation- -Kenneth IVarren of Lake Forest, 
first; Joseph Leonard of Rockhurst-, second; Leroy Brown of C-reenville, 
third. 

'.'/omen's dramatic reading— Doty Jensen of Lake Forest, first; 
Charlotte Waggener (Eerrin), Southern , Patsy Roberts, yurray, third... 

T "en's dramatic resting — Lowi-s Eamniack (Sp arta), So uthern , first; 
C-eor-e Seifert (DuQuoin), Southe rn, s econdj David Samples of Lake 
Porest, thii d. 

Radio ; T e-JScasting— Y/alter Burks, Rockhurst, first; Neal Bunn, 
yurray, second; John ITcDonough, St. Louis, third. 

Senior men's extemporaneous speak mg--Larry Pitman, Eureka and 
Walter Burks of Rockhurst, tie for first place; Carl Vfiaiberley 
(Granite City), Southern, third. 






m 9 — 

Senior ro;::cn's exteirporsneous sneaking—Eileen ^,rc.ner (Granite 
City), Southern, and Jean Erie of Luke Forest, tied for first placej 
Dorothy Thompson of Murray, bhird, 

Junior mixed extemporaneous s?eal< ---Lewis Eammack (Sparta), 
pH£^££j first; John Hendlenian (Anna), Sovtbem , second.; '.alter Stein, 
Eastern, third. 

Gr " ' -'•' cussioiv— Philip bice of Principia, Earl pillsbury of 
Eureka and Richard 'Vkalen, (Carbon :.le), Southern , ranked superior. 

Experienced men»s debate— 3a] «1 Lane (Eldorado), and Charles 
Weber (Cairo), r.outbc-m beam, Walter Burks and Darwin Gervais of 
Rock hurst, both undefeated. 

Beginners' debate--!, c. Tomlinson a nd Kenneth Warren of Lake 
Forest, Barbara Hahm and Jean ] ,1c of Lake Forest, and f'arvin Bennett 
and Eollis D-;er of Southwest Baptist, all undefeated. 



" "ji 

7/ - 



'-' a - ^ ie, 111., ..arcii -Dr. ; aurits Eesnar, chairman of the 
music department at Southern Illinois Formal University bas had 

seven of his new compositions for viola published recently by Gamble 
Hinged Company of C^icayo. 



Dr. Fesnar b 



iai naa o 



riginally been commissioned by the comoany to' 



compose two pieces for the viola, but on completion of the first two, 
he was i idiately asked to compose five more. Titles of the seven 
numbers c »ei "Americana," "Evening Campfire (by the Lake)," 
"He lloween," "In I'emoriam, " "llinuet Antique," "Puppet Dance," and 
"Shadow Picture." 

Dr. Kesnar is a member of the American Society of Composers and 
Publishers and has bad his compositions listed in the catalogues of- 
every major publishing house in the United States, be also has 
p ublished compositions in Belgium, Holland, a na Germany. 

He is row writing a book on t v e music written to Goethe- is Faust . 



__^_^___ 



^^M 



^^M 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbcnrale, 111., Harch -Two graduates of Southern Illinois 
Formal University, a husband-and-wif e team, receiver 1 a lull page 
sorer c! in a recent issue of the hew York Post Week- End Magazine for 
their work at the Henry Street Settlement's theater school* 

They are Edward hitcheil, formerly of Carbondale, and his wife, 
the former Kate Burldiart of Benton. 

Their first production, Arthur Laurents 1 "Home of the Brave," 
p layed eight instead of the originally- scheduled five nights, hitcheil 
designed the stage sets and directed the play, and Mrs, Mitchell 
handled the ho:: office for the performance. 

In their theater school, hitcheil trains the adults, of whom 
nearly 100 are enrolled, while Irs, hitcheil works with children. 

The two met while they were students at Southern. Both played 
in the University* s Little Theater, and received their early 
theatrical instruction from hrs. Julia heely of the English faculty 
who was director of the Little Theater. They married when they were' 
seniors. 

After graduation, hitcheil worked for six months as an apprentice 
at the Cleveland Playhouse and Hrs. hitcheil taught English at Olney 
high school. After hitcheil obtained his master of arts degree in 
drama from the University of Iowa while hrs. hitcheil held down odd 
jobs, he taught and directed at the Cleveland Heights high school. For 
three s ummers the couple worked at the Municipal Theater at Cain 
Park, Cleveland, he designing scenery, she handling the children's 
department and the box office. 

The war found !*itchell an army combat engineer, but he was later 
transferred to Special Services, end wrote and directed a soldier show, 
"As You ".'ere." Later he went overseas with' the outfit which included 
"ickey Pooney, Eugene List and Joshua Logan, well-known Broadway 
director, L'eanwhile, Mrs. hitcheil was a librarian in a base service 
club in Oregon, and later become entertainment director at the I'uroc 
Army Air Field in the hojave Desert. 

At the close of the war, they again joined forces, this time at 
the Provincetown Theater. They have been at the henry Street Play- 
house since September. 

j.'. 
it ; 









mmmmmmmmmmmmmmsmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 






MB 



* 



Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



5- 4- 47 

Ca r^ondale, 111., Mar. -A supervised daily recreation hour 
during the noon- period is an experiment being conducted at present 
by the University high School on the campus of Southern Illinois 
Kormal University in an attempt to cope v/ith the recreation problem 
that arises among students who oat their noon lunch at school. 

The program is an outgrowth of the ideas held and proposed in a 
conference of University Eigh School officials, John Tees, p rincipal, 
Jean Fligor, clean of boys, and hiss Zita Spradling and Frank Bridges , 
supervisors of physical education for girls and boys. 

Mr* hees says that the program has been planned to provide 
something of interest to a large number, to present opportunities for 
physical e:-;ercise and the development of skills. 

Panes and activities include checkers^ Chinese checkers, dominoes,, 
card games, social dancing to phonograph music, pingpong, horseshoes, 
ball throwing, darts, shuffleboard, and several devised games based 
on basketball throwing. 

hos t popular of all, !"r. kees says is basketball shooting, which 
attracts "/.ore participants than any other one activity. The activities 
are held in a gymnasium on campus, and one faculty member and one 

practice teacher in physical education can thus supervise the play 
and see that the interests of various group s are protected. 

Another worthwhile adji net to the noon hour has been the selling 
of milk and wholesome sandwiches by the high school Home Economics 
Club under the direction of hiss Helen Starck. 



a ji a 



the loop history 

1 * -he mostj; cheer,., ng news to I'aroonfans is the fret that 
the team has pii ed up lare- 



believe that t 



e sccorcs .in the last three games, and many 
ie squad haa £int"Hy perched its peak. 



s ■ Llrst team imclu.a es Johnny "Fr. Two hands 1 ' Sebastian, 

senior fn-rvra-n* p 

nr/ara mom Odin, V ;ho ce - sink baskets from the center of the 

the best of t>.. e:;j 1^ V ^ r - *• One Kand" Shoaff, junior 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3-5-47 



i 
l| 



Carbond: le, 111, *". r. -Incitement and speculation are 
beginning to run rampant at Southern Illinois formal university these 
clays. The cause of this is the fact that the Southern basketball 
■":roon?. v;ill be off next "arch 10 to Kansas City to defend their 
rational intercollegiate Athletic Basketball crown, which they won 
last year, to the surprise of many of the experts. 

The s indents are weighing the Karoons chances to repeat their 
1946 achievement and a re not finding it too hard to realize its 
possibilities, despite some of the unfavorabel qualities concerned. 

On the reverse side of the ledger, there is the fact that the 
If- roons have the record of 13 wins against nine losses, which is a 
considerably lower average than compiled by some of the participating 
schools, such as Loras College of Dubuque, Iowa, and Kansas State 
Teachers of Emporia, Kansas, who each have only one defeat on their 
s e " s on ' s r e c o rd , 

Add to that the Ifaroon's position of having a new coach, Lynn 
C. holder, who is making his debut in collcgiste circles, and the fact 
that the ': '"roons first team consisting of five men who never played 
together before th, s season, ~n?. the situation seems dark, 

:fo\vever, the other side of the books show that Southern has 
tanglec with some of the top teams of the country, and should no t b e 
e::cited over anything the" s *ee at Kansas City. That mentor trouble 
existing is belied by the f,.c:t that the Southerners have taken the 
Illinois Intercollegiate Athl".etic Conference crown, w ith a record 
of seven wins and one loss, a/gainst some of the strongest teams in 
the loop history, 

finally, the mosfe che^rf.ng news to Karoon fans is the fact that 
the team has piled up large scores .in the last three games, and :::any 
believe that the squad has £ini~Hy reached its peak. 

Holder's first team imclu-i en Johnny "Fr. Two hands 1 ' Sebastian, 
senior forward from Odin, who cs n -ink baskets from the center of the 
floor -iff the best of t>. e -- olUve. 'Tr. One Eand" Shoaff, Junior 



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forward from l.'t. carmel, who is one o f the best one-handed shots 
ever to take the floor for the Croons, r : uentin Stinson, sophomore 
center fro:.-. Eldoradeo, who by his excellent rebounding and pivot 
work has saved many a same for the Southerners, C-ene I-Iall, senior 
guard fro m G-alatia, whose wonderful rebounding end. set up work . 
belie his 31 years, and Fob Colborn, freshman guard from Flora, who 
although this is his first chance in college competition, is rated 
by Holder . s one of the best guards in the conference. 

The "want to win" spirit is highly prevalent in these men, as 
well a's the second team, which includes Sam T "ilosevich of Zeigler, 
Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City, Boyd lYilson o f Fairfield, Charles 
(Joss of r'arion, and John 3uzich of Johnston City, and any team 
desirous of lifting the I'arocr.s pmwn will have a tough battle to 
overcome this combination. 



-LUU/-.IL 

Innrit 






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I^^HB 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3-5-47 

Carbondale, 111. Karen -Leland p. "Doc" Lingle, track and 
cross-country coach at Southern Illinois Normal University, was 
mustered out of the Illinois Deserve "ilitia last r'onday night with 
the rani: of first lieutenant, the Southern athletic department has 
announced, 

Lingle, who served as plans and training officer with the 
Third battalion, served e_:,.ctly six years and three d ays with the 
militia. Of all those inducted on February 23, 1047, Lingle was the 
only officer present on the floor at the armory last Donday night. 

During his service with the militia, his nomination for the out- 
standing incident occured during the flood season of 1044 when he 
served as aid to general Lou Stacy and liaison officer. With only 
12 hours notice, he had to make arrangements for the living quarters 
and the feeding of over 800 men. According to Lingle, only aid from 
the university business manager, Edward V. Tiles, Jr., and the 
cafeteria manager, Lis. Lyd.a rind, te, enabled him to carry out his 
duties. 

Lingle, who has his plans for the coming track season well under 
way, plans to attend the Dig Nine track and field meet at Champaign 
next Saturday night. Although he is interested In all events, 
Illinois ' 440 yard run speedster has caught his eye, and. will 
probably take most of his interest. 

V.'.UL 

ff,nr 

Carbondale, 111., r.arch -The Southern Illinois Formal 
University basketball teem, and the coaching staff will be the guests 
of Early Throgmorton, honorary member of the "I" club, and president 
of the Carbondale and Ilarrisburg coach Lines, at a banquet to be 
held on Thursday night at Cecil's Inn, the Southern Athletic 
department h s announced. 

It U ti 

7/ i 






Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



5-5-47 



Carbondsle, ill., :*?r, -Glenn "Abe" J.Cartin, Southern Illinois 
Normal University athletic director will be guest speaker at two 
banquets in the near future... 

On Tuesday, I.'arch 18, he will be ^entertained at s basketball 
banquet at Kinmundy, 111., Ken }*aguire, captain of Southern's 
football team in 1950, is the present coach at Einmundy high school 
and will act as host. 

Cn Thursday, harch 20, he will be the guest of the Fairfield 
Lions club at a basketball banquet to be held in honor of the 
Pi Irfield high school eager s. 



j.um 

-,, irrr 



Carbondale, ill. '"arch -Over 10 pitchers and catchers have 
reported for baseball practice at Southern Illinois Normal University 
, Athletic Director end Baseball Coach 'Jle.nn "Abe" •rrtin has 
announced. 

All other men who are interested in this sport are requested to 
report to the athletic department on r-rch 24, for spring practice, 
Map tin said. 



J l J LI l. 
it uTT 



Carbondale, 111, rar # -Three lettermen from last year have 
reported to tennis Coach !Dill Preeburg, Southern Illinois Normal 
Un.iv rsity athletic department has announced. They are: John 
I-'aguire of Carbondale, coy Leilich of New Athens, and Joe Pulley of 
Marlon. 

All men who are interested in varsity tennis should contact 
Preeburg in the men's athletic office. 

Carbondale, ill. --_ r- _ T ; ie "I" club, honorary athletic 
organization traveled, to St. nouia last Sunday night to attend the 
St. Louis Plyers hockey; gatae, t e southern Illinois Formal university 
athletic dep rtnent has announced. Twenty men, chaperoned by caoch 
Bill Preeburg, made the hunt bo see the game, it was announced. 






m 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CAIIB< """"' ' L " NO ' 3 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. t^mHO^^mmmm^mmmi^^^m^^^^m 



Release Friday 3-5-47 

Carbondale, 111., inarch 6 -"Y/e are getting our new •"«••• 

refrigerators, our new automobiles. But our children are getting 
only one ■ qualified teacher for every 14 positions vacant." Raymond 
E» Dey, director of Extension and Placement Services at Southern 
Illinois Normal University, made this statement in an address which 
he gave over radio Station V/CNT at Centralia today. 

Dr. Chester P. Lay, p resident of the University, will speak 
over the same station on March IS, both addresses being scheduled in 
a series of programs sponsored by the Southwestern Division of the 
Illinois Education Association. 

Title of Dey's address was "The Present Critical Teacher 
Situation and How It Affects Our Children." In it he s tressed the 
shortage of well-qualified teachers in our schools today, and the 
urgent need for the reform of this situation. 

In speaking of the educational situation in Illinois, Dey said, 
"During the next four-year period we shall have available in the 
elementary field 696 tea chers for 9,300 jobs, only one-fourteenth of 
the number needed." In this "year alone, the five teachers' colleges 
and the University of Illinois will have only 109 elementary teachers 
ready to fill a vacancy of 2100. 

Dey said that teachers will be getting higher salaries next 
year, but the question is, will the increase be enough to attract 
enough additional young people into the teaching profession so that 
thr present critical shortage will be relieved. 



* -) n - - ' '- 1 o + 



me as'isLanGsray carneb a buipuiiu ui ,;±, uuu aim ai bu I'.m uay 
for laboratory and breakage fees. 

Chemistry assisWntships have been received by graduates of the 
University for many years, in many of the ledger schools throughout 

United Stater;. However, this is the first time a graduate of 
Southern has beer, /laced at the University of Minnesota, 



-2- 
A nd too, Dey asked if it will be enough to attract young men 
as well as young women, for he feels that the best school is the 
one that has both men and women"' teachers. 

In summing up, Dey gave a list of actions which every citizen 
could take to help alleviate the situation. He advocated higher 
salaries for teachers. "b'i'her salaries means more efficient 
teachers, and will soon mean more and better-qualified teachers," 
he said. 

Pie added that working conditions could also be improved. 
Teaching 00 or 40 children all day long is no ea sy ta sk, according 
to ^ey. He advocates reducing the number of children in a room to 
20 or 25, 

Dey also feels that the strict code which man3 T communities tend 
to ask of the tea die rs who instruct their children should be 
abolished, A nd too, he felt that encouraging more young men and 
women to become teachers would also help alleviate the difficulties 
of the situation. 

"Isn't it just good business to divert more of our income to 
educating, our youth so that they might face these problems better 
equipped to handle them successfully?" he asked in closing. 

WW'itTnrWir 



rne as isuantsra^ carries a snyena ol „i,uuu ana aiso van pay 
'or laboratory and breakage fees. 

Chemistry assist^ntships have been received by graduates of the 
University for many years, in many of the 1 ..r, ,er schools throughout 
the United States, However, this is the first time a raduate of 
Southern has been . iaced at the University of Minnesota, 






tx 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service ca.bohdali.illh.oh 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^m^^l^^^^m^mm^^am^mmmm 



3-7-47 
Carbondale , 111., March - If a recou, endation that President 
Truman has made to Congress for an additional -,50,000,000 
appropriation for housing goes through, Southern Illinois Normal 
University will receive its liull quota of 104 apartments for 
married veterans at the Illinois Ordnance Plant, Federal Public 
Housing Authority officials have notified University President 
Chester F. Lay. 

Original allotment of such apartments at the ordnance plant 
totaled 104, but rising costs of construction and remodeling later 
caused the FPHA to reduce the number to be made available to 68. 

A telegram received this week from Orvil R. Olmsted, FPHA, 
Chicago, informed President Lay that resumption of construction 
of the units suspended last December would be possible if Congress 
votes the additional amount requested by President Truman. A bill 
has alreaay been introduced uo amend the Lanham Act for this pur- 
pose and is now pending before the House Co..~..ittee on banking and 
currency. 



The as lstantshi, carries a stipend of : „.1>000 and also will pay 
for laboratory ana breakage 1'ees. 

Chemistry assists ntships have been received by graduates of the 
Umversitv for man ears, in many of the l...r er schools tnrouhout 
the United States. However, this is the first time a raduate of 
Southern has beer laced at the University of Minnesota, 



h 
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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBOMDALE ' iluno1s 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^■■■^^■■■■■■^^^■■^■^^^■i 



3-10-47 
Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale , 111., i4arch -Captain William E, Vorhies oi the 
United States narine Corps wiix be on campus at Southern Illinois 
Normal University on March 27 to confer with stueents who are in- 
terested in applyin^ ior a com., ission in the marine Corps Reserve, 
Presiaent Chester F. Lay has announced* 

Southern has been designated as one oi' the nation's colle_es 
at which students may pursue their college or university work and at 
the same time train as marine Reserve Officers. 

Captain Vorhies will have his headquarters on the campus at the 
men's lounpe, 1010 S. Thompson. 

Arrangements for Cd_ tain Vorhies' conferences are being made by 
William Winklemeyer, representative of the Illinois Veterans Com- 
mission, whose office is also in the men T s lounge. Advance copies 
of an information sheet concerninj the program may be obtained from 
Mr, Winklemeyer . 

It* *t ft 

Carbondale, 111., March -Robert D. Sauerbraumm of Jonesboro, 
a senior ac Southei n Illinois Normal University, has been granted 
an assist^ntsni^ in the Chemistry Department at the University of 
Minnesota, -.ccorain^ to Dr. J. W. Neckers, Chairman of the Chemistry 
Department. 

The as iscantshi^ carries a stipend of „ 1,000 and also will pay 
for laooratory and breakage fees. 

Chemistry assisim.ntshm, s have been received by graduates of the 

University for many years, in many of the l...r_er schools throughout 

. United States. However, this is the first time a raduate of 

•■ 

Southern has beer, /laced at the University of Rinnesota. 



L, 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^■■■^■^■■■■■■■■■■■^^^■■i" 



3-10-47 
Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., Inarch 11 - Jne of Southern Illinois' most 
distinguished sons will return this week when Lt* Gen. John R* Hod_e, 
commandinr: officer of the occupation forces in Korea, is brought to 
the lecture platform at Southern Illinois Normal University. 

Lt* Gen. Hod w e is expected t o arrive in Carboncale today to visit 
his mother, Mrs. Melissa Hodge, and has accepted the invitation of 
University President Chester F. Lay to deliver a public address 



SttuSSSfe evening, March 4-&\ on the University campus. 



Subject of his address has not yet been announced. 

Lt. Gen. Hod_e attended the University in 191$, and later 
attended the University of Illinois. 

He has attained .the highest rank in the U. S. Army ever held 
by any person from Southern Illinois since Gen. John a. Logan reached 
the peak of his Army career. 

President Lay issued an open invitation to the general public 
of Southern Illinois to attend Lt. Gen. Hodge's address. 

if.in a 

Carbondale, 111., March 11 - Hearing on the bill introduced in 
the General Assembly to change the name of Southern Illinois Normal 
University to Southern Illinois University is bein_ held in Spring- 
field today. 

University President Chester F. Lay and Dr. Orville Alexander, 
director of alumni services, are attending the hearin_. 

The measure was introduced by Sen. R. G. Crisenberry of 
Murphy sboro. 



ii 






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. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



For automatic release after 

3 p.m« Thursday, .'"arch 13 3-k2-47 

Carbondale, 111., '"arch 13 -Increased support for education, 
both public school and higher education, was urged by Dr. Chester ?. 
Lay, president of Southern Illinois Normal University speaking today 
over Station hChT, Centralia, under auspices of the Southwestern 
Division of the Illinois Education Association. 

Citing that education -Is "the one hope for the salvation of the 
world today, '■ threatened by atomic warfare and torn by international 
misunderstandings, he pointed out that Russia is spending approximately 
7 l/2 per cent of her income on education or- propaganda, while the 
thS.A. spends only 1 1/2 per cent of her Income for education. 

lie called attention to the fact that coll eyes and universities 
of the country are jammed with students--more than 2,000,000 being 
■nrolled in the nation's 1,700 Institutions of higher learning, more 
than half of whom are veterans • 

he also pointed out that the public schools are faced with a 
growing crisis occasioned by lac": of teachers. 

"hhen viewed in ail its aspects, the picture of education in 
America tod?"' is not an encouraging one," he declared. "The more 
p essimistic envisage a complete breakdown of the whole educational 
system, e.ivl through its breakdown, the dissolution of our whole 
civilization. 

"With such a grim situation, it seems imperative that we examine 
the aims of education, the manner of its operation, its assets and 
liabilities, and attempt to determine what needs to be c.one» v 

A sound education he said, should give to the individual 
(1) "an appreciation and an understanding of the world about him, so 
that he may be at home in his environment," (2) "The -hills and 
techniques w.'th which to earn his own living," and (3) "ethical and 
spiritual principles that will not only insure his own hs opiness but 

will draw from aim his finest talents on behalf of society and 
civilization • " 

"" e need to broaden our cultural c.r.c'. spiritual sights all alon'" 
the educational line, from :1 • -arten to the University," he 






asserted, "V/e need to place greater emphasis on the personalized 
contact between teacher and pupil. We need to strengthen the quality 
of our teaching personnel so that our teachers are rot only better 
equipped: to jive the highest caliber instruction in their technical 
and professional fields, but also to stimulate their pupils with 
enriching cultural values and to inspire then with the finest of 
spiritual and ethical standards." 

There is ■ only one way to guarantee this "broader, richer, 
sounder type of education", he raid --"by putting our finest minds 
arc our finest characters into the classrooms and laboratories." 

"But an increasing )er cent of our beet ; binds are choosing some 
other vocation or profession instead of teaching," he emphasized, 
[declaring that ore of the first steps in improving education "must 
be to raise teachers' salaries to a scale commensurate with their 
training c-.nC. professional standing." 

Increased support for the sin higher educational institutions 
in Illinois which are training teachers is likewise imperative, he 
insisted, "in order that the quality of general and professional 
education which they receive may be of the highest caliber. " 

He reported that Southern Illinois Normal University, though 
no longer exclusively a teacher- training institution, "shall never 
depart from the great tradition of teacher education." 

"Our College of Education still is our largest branch and most 
likelv it will always be one which will receive greatest emohasis." 
he said. n "' T e feel that the establishment and development of the other 
two colleges strengthens significantly the quality of our teacher- 
education program, and give us the opportunity to provide broader 
cultural ana '.ore intensive technical opportunities for our teacher- 
candidates ," 

The University* s College of Education is currently training 
1,138 future teachers, and through its extension program, Southern is 
conducting off-campiis courses in 19 communities of Southern Illinois, 

in which 976 adults, most of them teachers, are studying while 
continuing their regular jobs. 

:V'J' 
1 1 ill, 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3-12-47 
Carbondale, III,, March "An economic crisis stalks 
southern Illinois Schools, and a serious educational breakdown is 
ir che maKin^, unless i mmediate aici is forthcoming 1 ^ said jr. Howard 
Bosiey, Southern Illinois Normal University specialist in School 
Administration, in speaking to a group of 35 Southern Illinois city 
superintendents of schools here earl;' this week. 

a preliminary report based upon a hurried .survey made jointly 
last week by a committee of school superintendents and the University's 
College of Education revealed th&t "with some half-dozen exceptions 
of communities in oil or industrial regions," no Southern Illinois 
School is paying its teachers a salary which approaches an adequate 
economic wape. 

Six city elementary schools of 30 in the Southern Illinois area 
reported some of their teachers are L getting only $.1,200 per year. 
The average salary paid teachers tiris year in Southern Illinois 
communities reporting was £1,600. 

"Many of these teachers," said Dr. Bosley, "could move 200 miles 
In almost any direction and receive one and one-hali to twice their 
present salaries. " 

Few coliep-e students without exoerience graduating this ' r ear 
■ill receive less than „-2,400, but not man^ oi them will take positions 
in Southern Illinois schools because of the low salaries paid, the 
re_ art stated* 

The report further reveals that superintendents and school boards 
in their communities have been active in the attempt to increase 
teachers' wages , but duo to lack of available farm's these raises have 
not been more th n "token increases" in most instances. Lowest 

ex., pies of such v. : a*e increases were: £20.00 for the year, one-fourth 

Total salary increases 
Df one :. oath's salary, u 50,00 for the year, ■ re a y,o increase .#£Jbckk& 
for the 
'two-year period 1945-47 among the 40 schools supplyin usable answers 

avc r . ed |I35«00 per year. Superintendents in the 43 schools replying 



offered the near-unanimous hope th-t they will'be able to increase 
tec chers i salaries next, September. However, they were almost equally 
unanimous in their expression th ..t increases of any consequence would 
be impossible unless their schools receive more financial assist- nee 
from the state school fund. 

Speaking on this point, Superintendent Russell Malan of 
risbur_, Chairman of the meeting stated that any additional school 
funds th..t might be raised locally throurh property taxes in the 
cjii'j. unities would be entirely insigniixcant, compared to the amounts 
needed. 

The superintendents decided to support legislation now ponding 
in .he State Assembly which would provide emergency relief by paying 
equalization aid of lh times the .. 19/+6 claims, and to support a 
bill ruaranteeing &120.00 per pupil to every school. 

One bill, H. E. No. £7 is sponsored by Reps, Clabaugh, O'Neill, 
Sandquist, Bolder and Edwards, Another measure is shortly to be 
introduced b; the Governor's Commission appointed to study school 
finance. 

Enactment of these bills into law would' _ive some communities 
several hundred dollars additional money for each classroom unit, 
dr. Bosley said. Most of this increase would be used to raise teachers! 
salaries, it was pointed .out , 



ii 






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1 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3-14-47 

Carbondale, 111., March - Broadcasting will be resumed by 
Southern Illinois Normal University Monday, March 24, after a two- 
week recess, the University Inform. .tion Service announces. 

A daily 15-minute program will be broadcast Monday through 
Friday at 2:15 p. m. each week throughout the spring over Station 
WCIL (1020), Carbondale. The programs for the week March 24-28 
include: Monday, "Music Is Yours," presenting Dr. Maurits Kesnar, 
violinist; Tuesday, student newscast from the journalism department; 
Wednesday, "Campus Chatter," featuring the YWCA; Thursday, "Little 
Theater," a one-act play; Friday, "Southern Comes Calling," an in- 
formal talk on spring gardening, by Dr. R. C. Cassell, professor of 
agriculture. 

On Wednesday evening, a 30-minute program will be produced over 
Station WJPF (1340), Herrin. This program, entitled "The Southern 
Hour", will present Miss Susie Ogden, assistant professor of business 
and commerce, on "Cost of Living— March, 1947." 

"Education Time," a 30-minute program planned for public school 
children, will return to the air on Friday at 2:30 p. m. over both 
Station WJPF and Station WEBQ (1240), Harrisburg. 

t MS 

d nit u 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CABBONDALE ' lLL,NOls 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■^^■■■^^^^■■■^^^■■^^■^M 



3-14-47 

Carbondale, 111,, March - The nation's colleges and universities 
have a present need for en estimated 52,101,308 square feet of addit- 
ional needs of their 2,000,000 students, of whom more than a million 
are veterans, President Chester F, Lay of Southern Illinois Normal 
University declared today. 

President Lay called attention to these estimates made by the 
American Council on Education after a survey of the space needs of 
institutions of higher learning, based on a sampling of 155 such 
colleges and universities. 

In addition to present needs, further expansion for 1947-4$ 
should provide an additional 41, 759 : 629 square feet of space for 
classrooms, laboratories, library, office, cafeteri, infirmary, and 
recreational purposes, the report showed. 

Dr. Lay pointed out that a recent survey of Southern's physical 
plant by the U. S. Office of Education revealed an inure diate urgent 
need for approximately 1^.000 square feet of classroom, library and 
office space. 

On the basis of this survey, the University has obtained from 
the War Projects Agency an allotment of six temporary structures to 
be brought here from the George Army Air Field, near Lawrenceville. 
These structures will provide the required 13,000 square feet of 
space. They are scheduled to be ready for occupancy by next fall. 

if if <i a 



_ ^^^^^ ^^ _ ^^ Southern Illinois 

_—»_ Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE - Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. iHMaHHHaBMMHHBHHMHII^^HMMM 



3-17-47 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Carbondale, 111., March 17 - Thirty-four additional apartments 
at the Chautauqua Street Housing Project were turned over to 
Southern Illinois Normal University here today. 

University President Chester F. Lay accepted the apartments on 
behalf of the University from J. R. Horner, project engineer for 
the Federal Public Housing Authority. 

Veteran tenants for the apartments will begin moving in 
Tuesday, according to Van a. Buboltz, veterans housing supervisor, 
and Mrs. Mabel Pulliam, housing counselor. 

Already occupied are 41 apartments, making a total of 75 in 
the University's possession. Thirty more are still to be completed 
and turned over to the University by FPHA. 

Wit tf 



String Quartet from 1930 until 1935, then turned to viola solo work. 
In 1937 he became chief viola player for the NBC Symphony under 
roscanini, but in 1942 left the orchestra again to devote all his time 
to solo work. 

The Primrose concert is open to Community Concert members and to 
Jniversity students, who are admitted on their student activity tickets. 

m 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale. 1LUMO ' s 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^■■■■^^■^■■^^■^^^■^^■B 



3-21-47 
Carbondale , 111., March - Students will return to Southern 

Illinois Normal University Monday after a week's spring vacation, to 

spend two days registering for the spring term. 

More than 2,200 students pre-registered some weeks ago, indicating 

their choice of courses. For these registration next week will be 

simple. 

Several hundred new students are also expected to enroll Monday 

and Tuesday, as well as a number of old students who did not pre- 

register. 

tflftflf 

Carbondale, 111., March - William Primrose, recognized as the 
country's No. 1 violist, will be presented in a concert at Southern 
Illinois Normal University Monday evening, March 24, by the Carbondale 
Community Concert Association. 

Mr. Primrose, who has popularized the viola as a solo instrument 
in America, has won acclaim in this country, Europe and South America 
as a distinguished artist. 

A native of Glasgow, Scotland, he made his first public appearance 
at t he age of ten in the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto. After study at 
the Guildhall School of Music, financed by the Corporation of the City 
of London, he made his London debut in 1923, playing the violin with 
the Royal Albert Hall Orchestra. 

Giving up the violin for the viola, he played with the London 
String Quartet from 1930 until 1935, then turned to viola solo work. 
In 1937 he became chief viola player for the NBC Symphony under 
Toscanini, but in 1942 left the orchestra again to devote all his time 
to solo work. 

The Primrose concert is open to Community Concert members and to 
University students, who are admitted on their student activity tickets, 



_ _ m ^ m Southern Illinois 

m ^ mi ™ «_^_^^^™ Normal University 

Information Service ca«o»hi, iiumoh 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^— I I 



3-21.47 

Carbondale, 111,, March - Senior student veterans at Southern 



Illinois Normal University who are former officers in the U. S. Army 
and are interested in an Army career now have an opportunity to regain 
their commissions, University officials have been notified by the 
War Department, 

University President Chester F r Lay has received a letter from 
Maj. Gen. Edward F. Wit sell, Adjui# n t General, inviting applications 
from qualified former officer students who "are interested in an Army 
career but have not applied under the current officer procurement 
program due to their desire to complete their education." 

Students who will graduate prior to July 15, 1947, may submit 
applications, the letter pointed out. Deadline for applications is 
April 15. 

Inquiries concerning the applications may be made at the Dean 
of Men's Office at the University here. 

i if tin 

Carbondale, 111., March - David Karraker of Jonesboro, seniqr »' 
chemistry student at Southern Illinois Normal University, has been 
awarded a $1,000 graduate assistantship in chemistry at the University 
of California for next year, Dr, J. W. Neckers, chairman of the 
chemistry department, has announced. 

"We are particularly gratified at this appointment," Dr. Neckers 
said, for the University of California, now the largest university in 
the country, has one of the top-ranking chemistry departments in the 
nation." 

Karraker' s assistantship, in addition to. a $1,000 cash stipend, 
also provides tuition and fees at California, 

U'.i'it if 









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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CAKBO,,DJl18 - UUNOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■^■■^^^^^■^^■■■i^^^l^^^^HB 



'i, 



3-25-47 

Carbondale, 111., March - Three rrembers of the Southern 
Illinois Normal University Basketball team have been placed on the 
first All-conference team, Athletic Director Glenn "Abe" Martin 
has announced. 

The three men are Gene Hall of Galatia, who was named captain 
of the all-loop five, John Sebastian of Odin, and Quentin Stinson 
of Eldorado. Bob Colborn of Flora was named to the second team. 

The other two members of the first team were Frank Oliveri of 
State Normal, and Neal Hudson of Eastern. The second team was 
made up of Callaci of Northern, Olson of Eastern, Miller of Eastern, 
Landis of Western, and Colborn. 

The Southerners won the loop crown for the second straight 
time this year. 

m 

Carbondale, 111., March - After returning from a disasterous 
trip to Kansas City in which they were unsuccessful in their attempt 
to defend their National Association Intercollegiate Basketball, 
the S uthern Illinois Normal University Maroons were back looking 
over their season* s records as they prepared to register for the 
spring term. 

Winners of the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
crown for the second straight time, and also in their history, 
the Maroons wound up cage affairs with an overall record of 18 wins 
against 10 setbacks. 

In the 28 contests, the Maroons scored 1,4$ 3 points to their 
foes 1,330 giving them an average of approximately 53 points per 
game compared to opponents approximately 49. 

The highest average individual points per game were scored by 
forward John Sebastian of Odin, who scored 309 points in 26 games, 
giving him an average of 11,50 points per game. 

Closely following were Tuentin Stinson of Eldorado, who scored 
252 tallies in 23 encounters for an average of 10.95, ^nd Oliver 






-2- 

Shoaff «f Mt. Carmel who racked up 291 tallies in 27 games averaging 
10.34 points per game. 

The two guards, Gene Hall of Galatia and Bob Colborn of Flora, 
averaged $.28 points and 6.^2 points per game respectively. 

In the matter of fouls, the Southerners were guilty of 533 
miscues, while their adversaries were found wanting 531 times. 

At the free throw line, Stinson was the most proficient having 
714 percentage, while Sebastian and Shoaff had 645 and 632 percent 
respectively. Hall and Colborn had percentages of 540 and 420, 
respe ctively. 



Carbondale , 111., March - Ten years ago 79 per cent of the 
teacher-candidates who graduated from Southern Illinois Normal 
University actually entered the teaching profession. 

Last year, only 59 per cent of the graduates from the College 
of Education accepted teaching positions. 

These striking figures come from the annual report of the 
University Placement Service, which shows that the service was able 
to fill only 273 of the approximately 2,600 calls for teachers which 
poured in from harrassed school authorities. 

The report issued by Director Raymond H. Dey graphically 
illustrated the widening spread between the demand and the supply of 
teachers. 

Demand for teachers has climbed from a little more than 800 in 
1941 to more than 1,800 in 1945 and to 2,600 in 1946. 

Meanwhile, the number of registrants for teaching positions 
increased from a little more than 400 in 1941 to more than 700 in 
1943 but has dropped to around 500 for each of the last three years — 
1944, 1945 and 1946. 

Actual placements during that ten-year period have dwindled from 
almost U00 to 273 last year. 

A breakdown of positions secured for 1946 graduates of the College 
of Education through the Placement Service last year shows the average 
yearly salaries to be: high school positions, experienced ^2 , 133« 35 a 
inexperienced {>l,972»ll, elementary school positions, experienced 
frl, 870* 66, inexperienced $.1,685.92. 

The highest salary for experienced high school teachers was 
$3,000, the lowest ';;1,512; the highest for inexperienced high school 
teachers was $2,300, the lowest $1,650. The highest salary for ex- 



-3- 
perienced elementary teachers was $3,000, the lowest v l, 3 20; the 
highest for inexperienced elementary teachers was ,2,477, the lowest 
$1,320. 

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to be here before the first pame. 



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V_| — - — 



**V^ ^UXHUCU UUO 



Lting that a University committee on school reorganization was 1 

kointed over a year ago ana has been working actively on the problem. 

Thas committee consists of: Dr .. Howard E. Bosley, chairman; 
an Eugene R. Fair; Dr. Douglas E. Lawson; and Professors Willis E 
lone and F. G. Warren. Consultants are Professors George Bracewell 
d Ward Dillow, Qrs. Earl R. Hall and Victor Randoloh; and 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - Illinois i, 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■^■■■^■■^^■■■^■■■■^■■■■■■i ■ 



3-25-47 
Carbondale, 111., March - For the first time since the early 
f 20 T s, the carrpus of Southern Illinois Normal University will echo 
the sound of wood meeting leather, Director Glenn "Abe 1? Martin has 

(announced that baseball practice has begun. 
Fans, according to Martin, should not expect too much from the 
team, since they are operating under many adverse conditions, such as 
no home practice field, and plenty of bad weather to prevent practice 
sessions. 

However, Martin has made arrangements with Tony Stagno, owner 
of the Murphysboro class D league park in that city for the Southern- 
ers to use their park for several night games, which will be the 
first time a Maroon team has displayed its wares under the arcs. 

The unofficial schedule is as follows: April k and 5, Northern 
Illinois State Teachers Colle^e--here; April 12, Arkansas State 
University — Jonesboro, ark.; April 15, Eastern Illinois State 
Teachers College — here; April 19, Western Illinois State Teachers 
Colle ge-~here; May 2, Eastern Illinois State Teachers College — 
Charleston; May 10, Shurtleff College — here; May 29, Eastern Illinois 
State Teafhers College — here. 

Martin, who will coach baseball, expects about 75 men to vie for 
the nine positions. New uniforms have been ordered and are expected 
to be here before the first game. 

U'u tfJT 

iting that a University committee on school reorganization was 
ppointed over a year ago and has been working actively on the problem. 

This committee consists of: Dr. Howard E. Bosley, chairman; 
ean Eugene R. Fair; Dr. Douglas E. Lawson; and Professors Willis E. 
alone and F. G. Warren. Consultants are Professors George Bracewell 
nd Ward Dillow, Drs. Earl R. Hall and Victor Randolph; and 






Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CAaBOt,DALE - "■" MO ' s 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■^■i^BBBH^BI^^MH^i^l^™^™" 



3-26-47 

(Note to Editor: This is the first of a series of weekly articles 
which will be sent you during the next two months dealing with the 
problems of school reorganization in Southern Illinois. Perhaps you 
may wish to use these articles as the basis for interviews with your 
own local school authorities and school board members, or as the 
basis for editorial comment on the need for school reorganization.) 

Carbondale, 111., March - A nationally known authority on school 
reorganization will be brought to S uthern Illinois in April to serve 
as a special consultant to county superintendents, survey committees 
and others interested in school reorganization, Dr. Eugene R. Fair, 
dean of the Southern Illinois Normal University College of Education, 
has announced. 

The University will bring Dr. E.. L. Kirkpatrick of Washington, 
D. C, executive secretary of the Rural Youth of the United States of 
America and a prominent rural sociologist, to spend several days in 
conferences with groups in the three "blocks" of Southern Illinois. 

Making Dr. Kirkpatrick' s services available is the latest in 
the University's long series of contributions to efforts to help 
Southern Illinois solve its rural school reorganization problems, 
Dean Fair pointed onto 

"One of the most important problems facing Illinois today is the 
reorganization of rural school districts into larger administrative 
units through the abolition of the one-room school and t he very small 
high school, replacing these with much larger schools, 17 he explained. 

Ninety-three of the 102 Illinois counties are making plans for 
drastic changes in their school reorganization this year, he said. 

"The University has been mindful of the need for school reorgani- 
zation and is lending its services to the cause," he pointed out, 
citing that a University committee on school reorganization was 
appointed over a year ago and has been working actively on the problem. 

This committee consists of: Dr. Howard E. Bosley, chairman; 
Dean Eugene R. Fair; Dr. Douglas E. Lawson; and Professors Willis E. 
Malone and F. G. Warren. Consultants are Professors George Bracewell 
and Ward Dillow, Drs. Earl R. Hall and Victor Randolph; and 









-2- 

Mr. Jean Fligor. Dr. Hall is a specialist on school reorganization 
and has published a book on Schoo l Reorganizatio n in Illinois . 

Two service bulletins have been released: How to ColJe ct Data 
for a County Survey , and Observations of School Re orga ni z a t i on in ' B 1 
other States. ' i 

A bulletin^ on legal procedure involved in reorganizing sthool 
districts was i nitiated in the University School Reorganization 
Committee and developed by a sub-committee composed of Dr. Douglas 
Lawson, of the University faculty, J. F. Karber, principal, Ridgway 
Township High School, and Goffrey Hughes, county superintendent of 
schools at Benton, in cooperation with the Illinois School Board 
Association., This bulletin was subsequently published by the State 
Department of Education. Dr. Earl Hall and Dr. Howard Bosley are 
co-authors of a bulletin entitled Goals for School Reorganization in 



Illinois now in press. 

At the request of the editor of Illinois Education , Dr. Bosley 
prepared an article entitled "Some Goals for Educational Reconstruction 
in Illinois" which appeared in the November, 1946 issue. Other bul- 
letins now in process of preparation by various members of the 
University Committee on School Reorganization and consultants are 
"Curriculum Planning in the Elementary School", "A Handbook on Public 
Relations", "Salary Scheduling in the Public Schools", and "Aids to 
School Plant Planning." 

A series of weekly press releases dealing with problems of school 
reorganization is planned for the next two months. 

Last spring the committee sponsored a trip to Tennessee, Kentucky, 
South Carolina and West Virginia for the purpose of observing 
reorganized schools in action. County superintendents and county 
survey board members from eight counties made the trip along with 
several faculty members from Southern. 

Members of the committee have attended a series of six public 
meetings in Randolph County, seven meetings in Union County and num- 
erous meetings in various counties of Southern Illinois, such as 
Franklin, Hardin, Pulaski, Williamson, etc. Dr. Bosley appeared on 
the program of a state-wide meeting sponsored by the Illinois Rural 
Education Committee which was held in Springfield, March 14 and 15. 



•. e 



-3- 

In addition to making personnel and services at Southern available 
to the county survey committees while the surveys are in progress, 
Dean Fair said that plans are under way which will enable the College 
of Education to give additional services to existing schools as well 
as to new schools which may be created as a result o^ school reorgani- 
zation. Among these services will be field consultation on curri- 
culum construction and curriculum practice, school building planning, 
financial accounting and budgeting, salary scheduling, teacher 
education workshops and other special courses, and others as needs 
arise, 



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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^™ I | 



3-26-47 

Release Thursday 

Carbondale, 111., March - Dr. Robert C. Cassell, professor and 
chairman of the agriculture department at Southern Illinois Normal 
University, will speak Friday, March 28, over Radio Station WCIL, 
Carbondale (1020) at 2:15 p. m. on the subject "Planting of Spring 
Vegetable Gardens.*' 

This program, "Southern Comes Calling," is a regular weekly 
feature presented by the University over this station, and features 
an informal talk by a University faculty member each week. 

Carbondale, 111., March - The current Broadway success, "State 
of the Union," has been chosen by the Little Theater at Southern 
Illinois Normal University as its spring offering, Dr. P. M. Larson, 
director, has announced. 

Two performances are scheduled, for the evenings of May 15 and 
16. Tryouts are to be held in the Little Theater March 31-April 1. 

W#ft$ 












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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service cabbo«dah. iliwow 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■^^■■IM^MB^^^BMBI^MI^MB 



3-26-47 
Carbondale, 111., March - Over 70, nine of whom are lettermen, 
have reported for track practice at Southern Illinois Normal Uni- 
versity, Track Coach Leland P "Doc" Lingle has announced. 

Bad weather plus a tough schedule will give the Maroon thin- 
clads rou^h going during the early part of* the season, he said. 

Southern's unofficial schedule is as follows! April 5, Western 
Illinois State Teachers College--here; April $, Southeastern Missouri 
State University--Cape Girardeau; April 12, Arkansas State- Jonesboro; 
April 26, Illinois State Normal University-Normal; April 29? South- 
eastern Missouri State University--here ; May 3 3 Eastern Illinois 
State Teachers College—here ; May 10, Shurtleff College--here ; May 17 j 
State Meet--DeKalb. 

fhfff 

Carbondale, 111., March - A rare, wolf-like animal brought to 
Southern Illinois Normal University in January has been classified 
by a member of the State Wild Life Survey as a cross between a 
German police dog and a coyote. 

At first the beast was thought to be a timber wolf, according to 
John W. Allen, Museum curator, who brought it to the University State 
Farm, intending eventually to place it in the Museum. 

It was trapped near Karnak by Herschel Brooks, who, knowing 
Mr. Allen's interest in the rare and unusual, called him and offered 
him the animal. Mr. Allen transoorted the catch in his car to the 
University Farm, where Irvin Peithmair, supervisor of the farm, has 
since cared for it. A timber wolf in itself would be unusual in 
Southern Illinois, but the actual breed of the animal is extraordin- 
ary, Allen said. 



*i* 






Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service cakbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. m ^ mm ^ mm ^^^^^ a ^^^ mm ^^ mmm ^^ m ^ m i ^ 



3-26-47 

Carbondale, 111., March - The first official edition of "Our 
Museum", produced by the museum staff of Southern Illinois Normal 
University and dedicated to a more comnlete understanding of Southern 
Illinois, is being distributed, according to John W. Allen, curator 
of history and of the museum, 

A trial edition came out several months ago, says Allen, and 
now "Our Museum" is a full-fledged publication. 

A sketch of the old Chester Covered Bridge drawn by Lorraine 
Waters of Percy, editor and artist, adorns the cover of 'the pamphlet. 
Inside are articles on The Illinois Ozarks , a book by Clarence Bonnell, 
assistant principal and science instructor at Harrisburg Township 
High School; Fred Meyer, miner of West Frankfort who has won 
national acclaim with his wood carvings; the bird egg collection of 
the late George Halleck Center, presented to the museum by his son, 
Virgil Center of Benton; and others. 

"Our Museum" is produced by the museum staff consisting of 
Lorraine Waters, Percy, editor and artist; Doris Morgan, Fairfield, 
assistant artist; Barbara Bostic, Mt. Vernon, assistant editor; 
Julius Swayne , DuQuoin, biologist; Russell Peithman, Carbondale, 
student assistant; and John W. Allen, University curator of history. 

m# 

Carbondale, 111,, March - Professor Emerson S. Van Cleave, 
former instructor in the music department of Southern Illinois Normal 
University, now chairman of the music deoartment of Livingston State 
Teachers College, Livingston, Ala,, has been invited to attend the 
Symposium on Music Criticism at Cambridge, Mass. May 1-3. 

Professor Van Cleave was invited by the music department of 
Harvard University to attend the meetings and concerts of the Sym- 
posium, to which invitations are restricted to representative music 
educators and musicologists from various parts of tht United States. 

m 



1 1 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBO " DnE ' iluno1s 

lorena drummond, ed. mtm^^^^am^a^mm^mm^^^^^m 



3-2^-47 

Carbondale, 111,, March - Robert E. Tenney of East St. Louis, 
a senior chemistry student at Southern Illinois Normal University, 
has been awarded a graduate assistantship at the University of 
Kansas for next year, Dr. J. W. Neckers, chairman oi the chemistry 
department , has announced. 

The position will carry a stipend of U 700 and will permit Tenney 
to retain his G. I. educational benefits. He will teach part time 
and carry a three-fourths load of graduate courses leading to the 
master T s and doctor 1 s degrees. 



wtnr 



Carbondale, 111., March - Five Southern Illinois Normal 
University administrators have returned from the meeting in Chicago 
this week of the North Central Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. 

Southern was represented at the first meeting of this group since 
the North Central Association ''promoted" this institution to the 
rank of a full-fledged university on its list of accredited schools 
and colleges. 

Those in attendance were Deans T. W, Abbott, College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences; E, R. Fair, College of Education; Henry J, Rehn, 
College o f Vocations and Professions; Dr. Willis G. Swartz, chairman 
of the Graduate Studies Committee; and Raymond H. Dey, director of 
extension. Dr. Swartz also attended a meeting of graduate deans in 
Chicago earlier this week. 

M 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE ' "• UMO ' s 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■^■^^■^■■■■■^■^■^^■■■■■■M ( ( 



3-27-47 

Carbondale, 111,, March - Mr, and Mrs* Average citizen were 
advised to buy only necessities — and to buy only those for which 
they can pay cash — during the present cycle of high prices, by a 
Southern Illinois Normal University business professor in a radio 
interview here this week. 

Food prices are now up 9$ per cent as compared with 1939, Miss 
Susie Ogden, assistant professor of business, reported when she 
was interviewed by student Charles Weber of Cairo on a University 
broadcast over Station WJPF, 

Clothing prices have risen 7$ pe r cent, house furnishings 77 
per cent, fuel 31 per cent, and rent 4 per cent, she said. The low 
increase in rent she attributed to the fact that rents are still 
under Government control. She pointed out that much of the rise 
in rents had occurred before 1939* 

The gap between "money income" and "real income" — that is, the 
quantity of goods and services which ourmoney will buy--is serious, 
Miss Ogden said, Consumers actually spent 125 per cent more for 
goods in December, 1946 than they did in December, 1940— -but this 
money bought only 31 per cent more °pods than was purchased in 
December, 1940. 

"That is equivalent to saying that there is an increase in 
price of 71 per cent," she said, "Retail prices were up 17 per 
cent between July 1 and December 31, 1946, while consumer purchasing 
power was up only 8 per cent in that same period, 

"You can readily see that' these conditions place an alternative 
before the consumer of dipping into his savings or of mortgaging his 
future income by buying on credit, 

"Of course, when high prices put a squeeze on buying power, the 
consumer always has the choice of reducing his purchases to a 
minimum of bare necessities and dropping his scale of living below 
previous standards," ■ 



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J 



-2- 
Miss Ogden advised against going in debt while prices are high. 
"Incurring debt at present hi.°;h prices is a very poor economic 

policy for the reason that the occurrence of a recession — or at ' ' 

■ i 

least the time of recession--is indefinite," she said. 

"Recession may mean unemployment and, if not unemployment, at 
least a drop in wage rates. For the agriculturalist it would mean 
greatly reduced prices of farm products and therefore require 
increased quantity of farm products to meet debt payments." 

Asked to forecast the trend in the cost of living during the 
next few months, Hiss Ogden said that prices will begin to drop 
when supply begins to exceed demand. 

"Industry is at present pouring out a record volume of goods, 
and rising prices are driving out of the market many potential 
buyers. A probable break in the upward price trends has been 
predicted to come first in goodstuffs if the 1947 harvest, as now 
seems probable, is large." 

The first break could come in construction materials, she said 
since consumers are showing strong signs of resistance to building 
costs . 

As further advice for the individual consumer, Miss Ogden said 
"He must do his part in avoiding exaggerating the lack of balance 
between demand and supply and must limit his actual demand on the 
present inadequate supply by purchasing only necessities and making 
these purchases only cash ones." 

When supnly does come in balance, with demand and prices drop, 
then is the time for optimism, she said. "Buy while your money will 
secure for you reasonable quantities of goods and services so that 
the wheels of industry will need to keep turning to supply an ever 
active demand." 

m 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




■« I 



*l 



Special to Dailies 



•-2-47 



Carbondale, 111., May —Eleven journalism students of Southern Illinois 
Normal University are attending the 24th annual meeting of the Illinois Collegiate 
Press Association convention at G-alesburg May 2-3. 

The convention is "being held "by the University of Illinois undergraduate 
division. Robert A. Steffes, instructor in journalism, accompanied the students. 

Those making the trip are Jean Larson, Carbondale; Helen Holmes, Carterville ; 
Johnny DeLeonardo and Mary Alice Newsom of Marion; Marilyn Provart of Du Quoin; 
Thelma McCarty and Fred Senters of Flora; Woodrow A. Rust, Cairo; Dick Woods, 
Mt. Carmel; Julia Cook, Harrisburg; and Bill Plater, Vienna* 

# # # 

Carbondale, 111., May —Claude Hudgens of Marion, graduate chemistry student 
of Southern Illinois Normal University, has received a graduate assistant ship at 
the University of Illinois in the field of analytic and X-ray chemistry* according 
Ao a report from Dr. J. W. Neckers, chairman of the Southern chemistry department. 

Hudgens will study under Dr. G-. L. Clark, professor of national recognition. 
The assistantship allows $800 for fees* plus tuition, laboratory, and breakage 
fees, and benefits under the G-* I« Bill* 

# # # 



"The Barber of Seville," "Pa^liacci," "Trovatore," "traviata," 

"Faust," and "Carmen. His concert repertoire ranges from Handel, 
Berlioz, Massenet, Moussorgsky and Grieg to such contemporaries as 
Rachmaninoff and Villa-Lobos. 

Gorin not only sings, but composes, and has twelve published 
songs to his credit. Perhaps his l.ost popular song is "Viut Vitre" 
(Stormy Breezes), learned at his mother's knee, which was presented 
on his first American show, was the first recording he made for 
RCA Victor, and is an almost inevitable encore at a Gorin recital. 

m 



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j:*£.' 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE * ILLINOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^■■■■■■■■■■■^■■I^^^MMMBBB^ , 



4-2-47 
Carbondale, 111., Anril - Jim Dodd of Eldorado has been named 
temporary editor of The Egyptian , student newspaper at Southern 
Illinois Normal University, replacing Catherine Sullivan of 
Harrisburg, resigned. 

Dodd, who served as editor briefly before he entered the armed 
forces, has acted as news editor this year. He has been designated 
by the Student Publications Council to "carry on" pending election 
of an editor to serve for the remainder of the school year. This 
election will take place within a few weeks. 

M 

Carbondale, 111., April - Igor Gorin, renowned radio, concert, 
and opera baritone, will be presented at Southern Illinois Normal 
University as the season's fourth Carbondale Community Concert guest 
artist Thursday, April 10, at 8 p.m. in Shryock Auditorium. 

Gorin, a native of the Ukraine, studied at the Vienna 
Conservatory of Music for five years, and with a Czechoslovakian 
opera conroany for three years, during which he sang fifteen leading 
roles. 

Coming to New York, he landed a featured spot on the Roxy 
Music Hall Variety program, followed by engagements with such shows 
as "Hollywood Hotel," Firestone, Ford, International Harvester, and 
Kraft. 

In the operatic field he has made outstanding successes in 

"The Barber of Seville," "Pagliacci," "Trovatore," "traviata," 

"Faust," and "Carmen. His concert repertoire ranges from Handel, 
Berlioz, Massenet, Moussorgsky and Grieg to such contemporaries as 
Rachmaninoff and Villa-Lobos. 

Gorin not only sings, but composes, and has twelve published 
songs to his credit. Perhaps his i .ost popular song is "Viut Vitre" 
(Stormy Breezes), learned at his mother's knee, which was presented 
on his first American show, was the first recording he made for 
RCA Victor, and is an almost inevitable encore at a Gorin recital. 

M 



I 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - "."hois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■^■■■■■■^^■■■■^^■■^^^^M 






4-2-47 

Carbondale, 111., April - Avis Frank of Carbondale, a senior 
at Southern Illinois Normal University here, has been awarded the 
No. 1 scholarship for graduates of Illinois teachers colleges and 
normal universities granted each year by the University of Illinois. 

Each of the five schools — Southern, Northern, Eastern, Western 
and Illinois State Normal University — receives one scholarship each 
year covering graduate tuition. The five holders then compete for 
an extra $500 grant to apply on their living expenses while doing 
graduate j work. 

Miss Frank, who is majoring in physical education, not only 
received the scholarship open to a Southern graduate but has also won 
the $500 grant. 

She is a high-ranking scholar here at Southern, and is active 
in student affairs, including serving as president of Girls Rally, 
service organization; of the Spanish Club, of Pi Kappa Sigma social 
sorority, and participating in a number of other student 
organizations and activities. 

### 

Carbondale, 111., April 2 — Madrigal Singers from Southern 
Illinois Normal University will give two concerts at Fairfield before 
high school students on Thursday, Aoril 3, Floyd V. Wake land, director, 
has announced. 

The group will also be guests of the Fairfield Rotary Club 

at lunch. 

Members of the group are Patricia Fields of West Frankfort, 
Lorraine Carrington of Carbondale, and Bobby Ingram of Carbondale, 
first sopranos; Roberta Wheeler of Cprlinville, Martha Spear of 
Carbondale, and Merla Leach of Marion, second soprrnos; Carol Werner 
of Belleville and Charlotte Raubach of West Frankfort, altos; 
Johnnie Mulkin of Herrin and Eddie Kelvin of Tamaroa, tenors; Dave 
Mcintosh of Carbondale and Robert Eugene Howey of Fairfield, basses. 
Soloists are Misses Carrington and Werner and Mr, Mcintosh, 
Accompanists are Miss Wheeler and Florence Crim of Carbondale. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






4-2-47 

Carbondale , 111., April - Seed to help plant Friendship 
Gardens in under-nourished Europe is being collected by the 
agriculture department of Southern Illinois Normal University to be 
sent overseas by the Ail-American Friendship League, according to 
Dr. Robert C. Cassell, agriculture professor. 

Only seeds of vegetables, herbs and flowers are asked for at 
this time, he said. 

"Sending food in the form of seeds means that one shipment of 
vegetable seeds can become in one growing season the equivalent of 
several shiploads of food for hungry children," Dr. Cassell pointed 
out. 

Individuals or groups are urged to enclosed their names and 
addresses, or even a personal letter, in their "Seeds of 
Friendship" packages. 

Cash contributions to buy seed are also welcome, he said. 
Seeds or money to buy seeds may be sent to the University 
Agriculture Department, Carbondale, Illinois. 



Carbondale, 111., April - Dr. Mauri tz Kesnar, professor and 
chairman of the music department at Southern Illinois Normal 
University, has been invited to become a member of the Composers- 
Authors Guild, headed by the well-known composer Geoffrey O'Hare. 

Dr. Kesnar has composed some 60 pieces that have been published 
in this country and Europe. His latest compositions are a group of 
seven selections for the viola. 

### 

Carbondale, 111., April - Setting a pattern they are inviting 
other Rotary Clubs of Southern Illinois to follow, the Carbondale 
Rotary Club has adopted a resolution urging the Legislature to 
enact into law bills now pending to change the name of Southern 
Illinois Normal University to "Southern Illinois University." 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE ' ltL " ,ols 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^■^^■^^■■MM^MB^^^^^l^^^MMrfl , 



4-2-47 

Carbondale, 111., April - A quarter-century-old final 
examination was uncovered here at Southern Illinois Normal University 
when physical plant workmen tore down a. "temporary" wall in the Old 
Main Building. 

They discovered a blackboard on which appeared the chalked 
questions in a class taught back in 1922 by the late Dean George D. 
Wham, beloved professor of education and dean of the college! 

Dean Wham joined the University faculty in 1906, serving until 
his retirement in 1939. His death occurred in March, 1943* 

Dr. C. Neal Phelps, director of the physical plant, identified 
the final examinations, and because of the sentiment surrounding 
Dean Wham's memory, preserved the old blackboard until a photograph 
could be taken of the relic. 

m 

Carbondale, 111., April - A Spring Carnival, followed by a 
Junior-Senior Prom, is being scheduled by the Student Council at 
Southern Illinois Normal University for April 12. 

All campus organizations will ha^e booths end concessions at 
the carnival, slated to run from 2 to 5 p« m. in Old Science Building. 
A p£i rade will precede the carnival, with, the prom to be held in the 
evening. 

This will be Southern's first Junior-Senior Prom since the war 
and its very first spring carnival. 

Dick Avis of Marion and Chicago is president of the Student 
Council. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^■■■■■■^^^■^■^^■■^i^^ 






4-2-47 

Carbondale , 111., April - Due to bad weather which prevented 
early spring practice, the Southern Illinois Normal University four 
varsity sports teams— 'baseball , track, golf, and tennis, --will not 
oDen activities until next Tuesday, the athletic department has 
announced. 

The baseball team was scheduled to pry the lid off spring 
sports with contests slated for Friday and Saturday against 
Northern Illinois State Teachers College, but the Huskies reports*! 
that they haven't had any outdoor practice at all yet, and Southern 
Athletic Director Glenn "Abe" Martin was forced to cancel both 
contests. 

However, Martin stated that, weather permitting, intersquad 
games would be played on Friday and Saturday either on the Maroon 
practice field in the north end of Mc Andrew Stadium, or else in 
Sportsmen's Park in Murphysboro, where the Southerners will play all 
of their home games. 

Track Coach Leland P. "Doc" Lingle ' s cindermen have also 
cancelled their opening meet, in which they were supposed to play 
host to Western Illinois State Teachers Saturday. This cancellation 
was also due to poor spring weather conditions under which practice 
was impossible. 

Nuxt Tuesday will find three of the Maroon teams journeying to 
Cape Girardeau to tangle with the Southeastern Missouri State 
Indians. Lingle and his track team, Tennis Coach Bill Freeburg and 
his netsters, and Golf Coach Lynn Holder and his golf team will 
make the jaunt for the Maroons. 

Martin's baseball nine will not get a chance to display their 
wares against varsity competition until next April 12, when they 
travel to Arkansas State in Jonesboro, Arkansas to oppose the Indians. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■^■■■B 



Carbondale, 111., April - Girls, look to your laurel si 

Here's a GI at Southern Illinois Normal University who can beat 
you at your own cookstove. 

Home economics professors at the University lifted their eyebrows 
this week when William A. Hurley of Carterville presented himself as 
a candidate to take three special-credit examinations in home 
economics—and passed all three with flying colors. 

No, he hasn't had the courses, but just thought he'd like to 
have the credits which can be obtained by passing the special exams. 

He's enrolled in the College of Education and is majoring in 
sociology. 

### 



Carbondale, 111., April - Women who wish to qualify as nationally 
rated basketball officials will be given a rating examination at 
Southern Illinois Normal University on April 12, according to Dr. 
Dorothy Davies, president of the Southern Illinois Board of Officials 
(Women), and chairman of the Southern physical education department 
for women. 

The exam will be given by the Southern Illinois Board of 
Officials consisting of national judges Kay Isom, instructor of 
physical education for girls at Carbondale Community High School; 
Dorothy liuzzey, assistant professor in the University women's 
physical education department; Evelyn Parker, secretary of the Board 
and Southern student from Bluford; and Dr. Davies. 

The exam will be given in the women's gymnasium on the campus. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - ILL1NOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■^^^^^^■^■^■■■■■■■^^^^■^ 



4-7-47 

Carbondale, 111., April - A sectional Latin Contest for high 
school students, sponsored by the State Classical Association, will 
be held at Southern Illinois Normal University Aoril 12, Mrs. Evelyn 
D. Rieke, Latin teacher in University High School here, and sectional 
chairman for the association, has announced. 

"The contest is planned to encourage interest in the classics 
among high school students," Mrs. Rieke said. "This year's contest 
is the first one held since 1941." 

Entries for the contest include four pupils from Harrisburg 
High School, taught by Miss Louise T. Rice; two from Murphysboro 
High School, taught by Miss May M. Sauer; and three from University 
High School here, taught by Mrs. Rieke, 

In the contest, the students will compete for superior rating, 
which makes them eligible to enter the final contest at Northwestern 
University May 3« 



Carbondale, 111., April - The Illinois Association of Supervisors 
and Directors of Instruction will hold its annual meeting at Southern 
Illinois Normal University on April 25, according to Dr. Mary 
Entsminger, associate professor in the University's Allyn Tr£ ining 
School, and vice-president of the Association. 

The group meets annually at one of the Illinois State teachers 
colleges and will visit Southern for the second tii..e in 25 years, this 
time at the special request of the members. Their first trip to 
Southern Illinois was during peach-blossom time. 

Illinois public school administrators will attend, of which the 
largest representative ^roun is from Illinois cities. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^■^^■^^^^^■^^^^^^■i I 



4-7-47 

Carbondale, 111., April - Three varsity teams from Southern 
Illinois Normal University — tennis, track, and golf, — will go into 
action Tuesday when they invade Cane Girardeau to tangle with the 
Southeast Missouri State Indians. 

The track team will send eight lettermen out for battle, according 
to Track Coach Leland P. "Doc . " Lingle . They are Charles Beatty of 
Benton, Glen Hamilton of Pinckneyville, Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, 
Jack Hayse of Benton, Gene Davidson of Harrisburg, John Algee of 
Carbondale, Leonard Burden of Johnston City, and Carl Birkner of 
Pinckneyville . 

Four lettermen dot Coach Bill Freiburg's tennis squad. They are 
Joe Pulley of Marion, Roy Leilich of New Athens, John Maguire of 
Carbondale, and Ed. Williams of Galatia. The Southern netsters are 
Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference crown defenders. 
Coach Lynn Holder's golf team, the first in varsity history at 
Southern, expects to have tough going against their opponents who have 
competed during the past years. 

On April 29, the Indians will invade Carbondale for a return visit • 



Carbondale, 111., April - Gene Hall, 32 year old guard of the 
Southern Illinois Normal University Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
conference basketball champions, has been elected team-captain, 
basketball Coach Lynn Holder has announced, 

A physical education major, Hall said he i s intending to take up 
coaching as a career, after graduation this spring. 

Hall was probably the oldest eager to take the hardwoods this 

past season, and he reached his peak in the National Association of 
Intercollegiate Basketball tourney in Kansas City, as he scored 17 
points, although Southern unsuccessfully defended their crown. 

Hal], ' s steadying influence throughout the year convinced Holder 
that he belonged in the lineup and the mentor can probably credit 
many of his "won" ball games to Hall directly. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. MBHHHH^naBIMHHBHHHHi^HHHHl 



4-10-47 

Carbondale, 111., April -All the thrills of a big Spring 
C'rnival and a Junior Prom combined are ahead of the Students of 
Southern Illinois Normal University on Saturday, April 12, 
according to the sponsors, Southern's Student Council. 

The Spring Carnival--animals, spook houses, and hula dancers - 
all will set a precedent in the history of Southern, while the 
dance will mark the first Junior Prom since before World VTai II. 
Campus organizations and organized student houses are busy setting 
up booths of concessions to drav; a crowd to the Carnival, while 
a Prom Princess, whose name is still shrouded in mystery, has 
been elected by the students to reign Saturday night at the dance. 

Six Princess candidates were noniinated--Melba Carr and 
Barbara Schwartz of Carbondale, Velma McCormick of Johnston City, 
Lois Pierce of Royalton, Charlotte Rauback, "-Jest Frankfort, and 
Amy D^e Rudolph of Anna. One will reign as princess, and the 
next three receiving the highest votes will make up the court. 

A parade through downtown Cr.rbondale will be held Saturday 
afternoon, in which the Carnival characters and Prom Princess 
candidates will participate. 

The naming of the Princess ceremony and carnival capers will 
be broadcast ov^r radio station 7JPF (1340 k. c.) April 12 from 
10:45 to 11:15. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBOMDAL *' 1LL """ S 

lorena drummond, ed. ^^^^mm^^mmmamm^^^^mmammmmi^ ( 



i i 



4-10-47 

Carbondale, 111., April 10 - "Southern has not had a new classroom 
building in 20 years," students at Southern Illinois formal University heard 
today from Dr. Orville Alexander, director of Alumni Services. 

Speaking to a group of several hundred students, Dr. Alexander said 
"the 'new' gymnasium maybe was new when your fathers and mothers were in 
school here, but it certainly isn't 'new' any longer." The gymnasium was built 
in 1925. 

The last classroom building constructed at Southern is Parkinson Laboratory, 
built in 1928. 

"I don't believe there is another state institution in Illinois that is 
as bad off for buildings as we are, Dr. Aiesander told the students. "Inmates 
at the State prisons and patients at the State hospitals are housed in far 
better physical plants than Southern has. Many of the public schools have 
much more modern campuses than we have here." 

"Not only do we need a re-appropriation of the money appropriated to us 
for 1945-47 to build a training school, a power plant and service shops, and 
utility distribution tunnels — we need more than the original appropriation for 
these particular purposes. But we also need legislative appropriations for 
a new library, for classroom buildings, for dormitories." 

The University's long-term planning committee has designated a library, 
two classroom-laboratory buildings, and other smaller structures as the 
University's most urgent needs — in addition to buildings already authorized. 
It is hoped, Alexander said, that funds for both of these will be appropriated 
at the current session of the Legislature. 

In adrlition, the Teachers College 3oard has indicated it will seek 
legislation at this session to permit Southern and the other institutions in 
the Teachers College system to issue bonds for construction of dormitories 
and other needed self-liquidating buildings. 

With 2,434 students enrolled this term — 1,394 of t :, em veterans — the 
University's physical plant is critically inadequate. 

Classes are meeting from 8 o'clock in the morning, through the lunch 
period, and on until 10 o'clock at night. Classes meet in instructors' offices* 

(more) 



-2- 

in Anthony Hall, girls' dormitory, in the auditorium, and in "basements. 

Laboratories even have to he held at night in order to offer instruction to all 

students registered fof some of the laboratory courses. 

Library reading rooms will accommodate only a fraction of the present 

student body. This building was constructed in 1903, when the student body 

numbered only a few hundred. A recent survey by the U. S. Office of Sdudation 

showed an "immediate, dire need" at Southern for 4,000 additional square feet 

of reading space. 

Office space for faculty*- members is another critical need, University 

officials point out. The faculty and staff has increased from approximately 
120 two years ago to more than 180 now, with no additional office space made 
available. Many instructors have their desks in classrooms — unsatisfactory to 
both teacher and students. There are 20 or more persons occupying a single 
office in some cases. Few of the University officials or faculty have private 
offices in which to interview either visitors or students — a situation 
particularly undesirable for counseling students. 

Southern's present physical plant consists of the following permanent 
buildings: Main Building, constructed in 1887; Old Science Building, 1896; 
Library, 1903; Allyn Training School, 1908; Anthony Hall, girls' dormitory, 
1913; heating plant, 1915; Auditorium, 1916; Gymnasium, 1925; Parkinson 
Laboratory, 1928; the stadium, 1938. 

In addition, the Southern campus is cluttered with temporary structures. 
The Health Service, the Government department, the Veterans Guidance Service, 
the men's lounge, physical plant offices, workshops and storerooms are all 
located either in former residences or in temporary barracks-like structures. 
Buildings on the University Farm are frame buildings, inadequate in both 
size and suitability. 

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— ^ ^ ^_ _ Southern Illinois 

_________ Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■^■MIMBMHHHHHMH^MHI^M 



April 10, 1947 

Carbondale, 111., April Color lithographs and Indian 

paintings by Carlos kerida, noted Mexican artist, and by 
American Indian artists of Mew kexico will be exhibited in 
the Little Art Gallery of Southern Illinois iMormal University 
April 12-1. ay 3, according to Ben Catkins, University assistant 

professor of Art, 

The color lithographs by kerida are called '"Dances of 
kexico," while the Indian paintings include animals and 
tribal dances. 

Showing of the Indian paintings was made possible through 
Miss Eva Mirabel, artist-in-resident at Southern, Indian 
^rtist from New Mexico. 



Carbondale, 111., April Sports Day at Southern 

Illinois Normal University will be held by the Women's 
Ati.ietic Association on Saturday, April 19, from 9 a.m. to 
3 p.m., according to Dr. Dorothy Davies, Chairman of the 
Department of physical Education f or women. 

Included in the day's activities will be volleyball, 
badminton, and table tennis, to be held in the Women's 
G y mna s ium on c a mpus • 

Students from Monticello Co±le_e, Godfrey, Illinois, 
and from Washington University, St. Louis, will be guests 
of the association. All F.E. students of Southern re 
invited to ;articipate. 

Luncheon for the group wiil be served in the University 
cafeteria. 



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■Mfa 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



I I 



4-10-47 

Carbondale, 111., April -Once again putting their fate 
into the weatherman's hands, the Southern Illinois Normal 
University baseball, track, tennis, and golf team, will take off 
for Jonusbo.ro, Arkansas, on Saturday to battle the Arkansas 
State Indians. 

Twice before, the toa^s had prtnar^d to pry the lid off the 
spring soorts season, but both times inclement weather forced the 
oostDonument of these meets. 

The Southern athletic department is hopeful, however, that 
this weekend will see the Maroons get under way. 

The track and tennis teams are liberally sprinkled with 
returning lettermen, and should be ready to meet anything the 
Indians have to offer. However, the baseball team, which has 
been resurrected from the early 1920 f s, and the golf team, which 
is the first one in varsity history, are big question marks. 

The lack of practice, because of bad Weather, has caused 
each coach no little xvorry. A run of ^ood weather, though, would 
out the Maroons back into gear, and with good fortune in the 
forth-c dining meet, the lost spring practice might never be noticed 



puuxxe- euueaeien in Illinois," citing Chat tor the past year r.nd 
a half, School Survey Committees have been making intensive studies 
of their schools in 93 of the 103 Illinois counties. 

These committees have made statistical studies of schools, 
ooDul.it ion trends, ta •: receipts, and road systems in their counties. 
They have attended state meetings, heard nationally known speakers 
:>n school reorganization, and in some instances have toured oth r 
states inspecting reorganized : nd consolidated schools. 



m ^ _ _ _ ^^^ mm ^^^^ Southern Illinois 
i _ — _ ^ ^_^_ Normal University 

Information Service ca»bo«dah. uumoh 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^— | I 



4-10-47 
[Note to Editor: This is the Second in a series of weekly articlus 
which v./ill bo sent you. def.lin~ with the problems of school 
reorganization in Southern Illinois. Perhaps you may wish to uso 
jthese articles as th^ basis for interviews with your own local 
school authorities and school board members , or t ..s th^ basis for 
editorial comment on the neod for school reorganization. ) 

Carbondale, 111., Anril -'•Illinois, with its 11,900 school 
r 
districts, of which more than 9 5 000 are one-room schools, is subject 

to criticism throughout the nation," Dr. Earl R. Hall, Southern 

Illinois Normal University specialist in school reorganization, 

Dointed out in a statement released here today. 

"Deplorable conditions which exist in Illinois schools have 
bt.n publicized by photographs end articles in magazines which 
lave national circulation, :i he said. :, It is time that Illinois 
'put its house in ord^r, ' and thereby get better schools for its 
children. 77 

Inequalities in education' 1 opportunity exist in every county, 
in the State, Dr. Hall author of the book The Administrative U nit 
_in Illinois, published in 1939, declared. 

"It is no longer possible for the one-teacher country school 
and the very small high school to provide adequate educational 
ppoortunities for its boys and girls, and do this economically, ,f 
he explained. i? Even with an inadequate offering, the small 
enrollment school sometL es costs three to four hundred dollars per 
oupil per year, as contrasted with the average cost of approximately 
$100 per pupil in larger schools." 

He resorted that opinion is swinging in favor of a "change in 
public education in Illinois," citing that for the past year and 
a half, School Survey Committees have been making intensive studies 
of their schools in 93 of the 103 Illinois counties. 

These committees have made statistical studies of schools, 
population trends, t£". receipts, and road systems in their counties. 
They have attended state meetings, heard nationally known speakers 
on school reorganization, and in some instances have toured oth.r 
states inspecting reorganized nd consolidated schools. 



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"These committees seem unanimous in their expression that 
something must be done to improve Illinois education through the 
elimination of the snu-ll district administrative unit." 

Dr. Hall contrasted the facilities found in»thu larger 
administrative units and those in the small districts* 

In one community there will be a district with an onriched 
curriculum, a long school term, progressive administration and 
supervision, a teaching staff well- qualified, end buildings that 
arc srnitary, fire-proof, and attractive. 

Yet in a neighboring district there may be housing and equipment 
that is noor, administrative and supervisory service that is 
inadequate or actually lacking, and sometimes a teaching pure-_:nnel 
that is relatively inexperienced and. untrained. 

"As long as we have nearly 12,000 autonomous school units in 
Illinois," he said, "there will remain gross differences in the 
educational opportunities of our children. 

"An increasing number of county school survey committees in 
Illinois seem convinced that the only remedy for the current 
school situation is the creation of' larger school administrative 
districts, in many cases <' s large as the entire county, with 
att.ndrnce units of eight, ten, and more teachers each." 









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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - ituwou 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■^■■■■■■IMBB^i^^^i^^^M^M 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 4-11-47 



Carbondale, 111., April — Dr. E. L. Kirkpatrick, executive 
secretary of the Rural Youth of the U.S. A,, and an outstanding rural 
sociologist, will come to Southern Illinois the week of April 15 
under sponsorship of Southern Illinois Normal University, Dr. Eugene 
R. Fair, dern of the University College of Education, has announced, 

A series of "block" meetings of county superintendents, county 
survey committees and others interested in school reorganization, is 
being arranged to give these school officials and supporters an 
opportunity to hear Dr. Kirkpatrick. 

The following meetings have been arranged: Belleville, April 15, 
at the •■ i nior High School, 7:30 p. m., with St. Clair County Supt, 
Clarence Blair in charge; Carbondale, April 16, supper at the 
University cafeteria at 5:30 p. m. , and a meeting at 7:30 P« m» i n 
the Little Theater, with Dean Fair in charge; Olney, April 13, supper 
at 6; 30 p. m. at Wayne's Restaurant, and a meeting at 7:30 p. m. at 
the Court House, with Richland County Supt. C. I-T. Van Clove in charge. 

In addition, Dr. Kirkpatrick will address a convocation of all 
students in the University College of Lduc tion in the University 
Auditorium at 10 a.m. Thursday, April 17. 

/' II 7 

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Carbondale, 111., April --The Southern Illinois Normal University 
Chorus will appear on the 15-minute radio program, "Music Is Yours," 
next Monday at 2:15 p. m. over Station W0IL. 

This program is a regular feature each Monday, part of a series 
"The University Hour" sponsored by Southern, 

* # § 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE ' ,lu,OM 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■^^■^^^^■■IH^^^IB^MHII^^ 



4-12-47 

Carbondale, 111., April The famous "Cart-r's Corner," 
where many "generations" of Southern Illinois Normal University 
students have "jellied" between classes «nd in the evenings, h°.s 
changed h nds. 

It now belongs to the University, which will take possession 
in June . 

Business Manager Edward V. Miles, Jr., has announced that the 
entire '''Corner, 7 ' embracing Carter's Cafe, the popular student 
pang-out and three residences, has been purchased for .>93,000. 

mil -.s said he would refer the question of future use of the 
fcfife property — pending clearance of the land for future buildings- 
to the University space committee. 



Acouisition of "Garter's Corner" brings the University's land 
acquisition program into the home stretch, Miles said. Property 
totaling L.515,150 has been acquired or placed under option during 
the past year. Only four or five of the approximately 35 pieces 
of property embraced in this figure are still under option, he 
said; the remainder have been actually purchased. 

The University has now acauirud title to all except one tract 
required for the entire duvelcpment in tins area of the new 
training school, he said. This area stretches along Grand Avenue 









, 



from University Avenue to Lake Strict. 

The University has also acquired all of the rcreage— though 

, not some frontages--west of U.S. Highway 51 from Chautauaua Street 
to the- Reservoir Ror.d. 

Purchases of a number of oth^r piwCes of property in the path 
of the University *s long-range expansion program are still pending, 
Milv.s srid. H^ is proceeding to initiate condemnation suits to 
acquire those to which title hu s not boun acquired by negotiations. 

As for the Cart or property, he said that Edgar and R ndle 
Cart .r would continue to operate the cafe on a month to month 

.tenancy until the end of th<~ spring term. Mrs. Carter Hale, who 
occuoies the residence immediately north of the cafe and who v/as 
one of the owners, has been extended the privily- of continuing 
to occupy the property on a month-to-uonth basis until such time 
as the University requires it. The same privilege has been extended 
to the tenants in the other two residences, Kiles said. 



41 -ii ,'/ 
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Release Monday 



Harbondf.le, 111., April — Newscasters from the journalism 
lepartment of Southern Illinois Normal University for the news 
broadcast over ./GIL (1020 k.c.) Tuesday, April 15, at 2:15 p.m. 
will be Don Morris of Marion, Fenton Harris of Tamaroa, Bob Brayficld 
of Christopher, and Bill Price of Texico. 

ff # # 






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Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



April 14, 1947 

Garbondale, 111., Aoril -Parenthood is one of the extra- 
curricular problems of 173 married student veterans at Southern 
Illinois Normal University. 

More than one-fourth of the veterans currently enrolled are 
married--3b3 out of 1,401, according to a survey made by Mrs. 
Mabel Pulliam, housing counselor. 

The 173 parents among the married veterans have a total of 
192 children, the survey reveals. 

To add to their headaches in getting an education, 143 of 
these married veterans commute— "that is, live out of town and 
drive or ride a bus or "hitch-hike" to get to classes. 

Mrs. Pulliam reoorts that aooroximately 05 of these veteran 
commuters have children. 



Carbondale, 111., April -Between 250 and 500 Southern 
Illinois high school "scientists" will descend on the campus 
of Southern Illinois Normal University Saturday, April 19, for 
a Science Field Day, jointly sponsored by the University and the 
Junior Academy of Science, according to Dr. Salter B. Welch, 
associate professor of botany. 

Exhibits of science materials prepared by the junior 
scientists, a greeting by radio from Dr. Leo R. Tehon, secretary 
of the Illinois Academy of Science, and a showing of a little- 
known motion picture film on the atomic bomb, made by Dr. Allison 



.re scheduled. 



of the University f j^ic - o 

Guest sneaker for the occasion is Dr. Anton J. Carlson, 
distinguished scientist from the University of Chicago, who will 
address the junior scientists Saturdry afternoon at 2 o'clock, 
on the subject of his own choosing. 



*^ 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE. ILLINOIS 



4-14-47 

Carbondale, 111., April -A three-point legislative 
program moved into high r ;ear here this week-end at Southern Illinois 
Normal University as University officials prepared to mobilize 
students, faculty, o,500 alumni, and citizens of Southern Illinois 
in behalf of: 

(1) Change of the institution's legal name to ; 'Southern 
Illinois University"". 7 

(2 ) Appropriation of a $4 l/2 million budget for the 1947-49 
biennium. 

(3) A building program to enlarge and modernize the ''pitifully 
inadequate" physical plant. 

Literature being mailed by Dr. Orville Alexander, director of 
Alumni Services, to legislators, alumni, and other friends of the 
University stressed that the word ''normal" should be dropped from 
the school's name since "normal 5 ' means a two-year, non-degree 
granting teacher-training institution. .-".Southern, it was emphasized, 
is now a five-year full-ranking university, offering degrees in 
arts and sciences, vocations and professions, and graduate school, 
as well as in teacher-education. 

A $4 l/2 million dollar operating budget is sought to expand 
instructional and service programs to care for the 2,500 students 



in "one k run <£/+ xasuw o± cms puuxj-un oiuu , s/ravcj o n^^^ ,j. « m 
appeared as a sneaker at the plastics symnosiuin of the American 
Society for Testing Materials, and in the March 31 issue, a 
photograph of in his laboratory appeared in an advertisement for his 
company, the Monsanto Chemical Company. 

Graver graduated from southern's chemistry denartm nt in 1937. 
His home was formerly in ilurphysboro. 

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now in school and the anticipated 4O0O enrollment within a few 
years . 

Broadening of the curriculum to university-scale operation 
with a full range of academic and technical courses for the 
present and anticipated student body will require the addition of 
approximately 125 faculty rnd staff members in the next biennium, 
and the addition of much equipment, text books, library materials, 
laboratory supplies, etc. 

Buildings are considered the University's No. 1 need, however, 
and appropriations are be inn; asked for; (1) a library; (2) two 
classroom-laboratory buildings; (3) other smaller structures 
including University Farm facilities; (4) reappropriation— with 
supplementary funds to cover increased costs— of monies allocated 
for the current biennium for a training school, power olant , 
service shops, and utility tunnels. 

Dormitories are "another major' need, but measures already 
being' considered by the General Assembly, authorizing Southern 
and other schools in the State Teachers College system to issue 
bonds for construction of dormitories and other self-liquidating 
projects, are meeting little opposition, 

"We recognize the vast demands, many of them excessive, that 
are being made on the financial resources of the State at this 
time, 1 ' Dr. Alexander pointed out in a communication to members of 
the State Budgetary Committee. '"The many thousands of alumni 
of the five schools (in the Teachers College System) hoae and 
expect that the building needs of the colleges will be considered 
in the light of the overwhelming need. ,? 



In th< larch 24 issue of this publication, Craver^s nnotograpn 
appeared as a speaker at the plastics symoosium of the American 
Society for Testing Materials, and in the march 31 issue, a 
photograph of in his laboratory sared in an advertisement for his 
company, the Monsanto Chemical Company • 

Craver it duated from Southern's chemistry denartm nt in 1937. 
His home was formerly in murphysboro. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



4-17-47 

Carbondale, 111., April -Jr. A. J. Carlson, physiologist 
and professor emeritus at the University of Chicago, will • rrive 
here Friday to address several hundred Southern Illinois high school 
scientists attending a Science Field Day here Saturday. 

Dr. Carlson will be the guest of Southern Illinois Normal 
University for a faculty dinner Friday night, and will speak to the 
junior scientists Saturday at 2 p. m. 

The Field Day is jointly sponsored by the University and the 
Illinois Junior Academy of Science. 

Schedule for the day's events follows: B a. m. — mounting of 
exhibits; 9:15 a. m. — address of welcome by radio, Dr. Leo R. 
Tehon, secretary of the Illinois Academy of Science; 10 a. m.— 
for one -roup a series of movies, including an unpublicized film 
on the atomic bomb, for another grouo , a tour of the University's 
science deoartments; 2 p. m. , Dr. Carlson's address; 3 -'30 p.m., 
award of certificates of merit-.- 

Dr. "alter 3. h'elch,, chairman of Southern's botany department, 
has served i s chairman of ar ;ngements for the Science Field Day. 

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Carbondale, 111., April -For the second consecutive issue 
a Southern Illinois Normal University graduate, J. K. Craver, has 
''made" the pages of ChemiCcl and E ngineer in g News, national 
profession:! ma ga z in e . 

In the Parch 24 issue of this publication, Graver's photograph 
appeared as a sneaker at the plastics symnosium of the American 
Society for Testing Materials, and in the March 31 issue, a 
photograph of in his laboratory >eared in an advertisement for his 
company, the Monsanto Chemical Company* 

Craver graduated from Southern's chemistry denrrtm nt in 1937. 
His home was formerly in iiurphysboro. 

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_^—__ Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE - Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■««■■■ 



4-17-47 

Cerbondale, 111., April -A statewide meeting of Illinois 
school supervisors will be held on the campus of Southern Illinois 
Normal University April 25, the first time this ^roup has met her 
in a quarter of a century. 

The group will spend Friday at the University, then will go to 
Giant City State Park to spend the evening and night and will hold 
a Saturday morning session there. 

Y.ey speakers for the meeting will be Dr. L. 3. Smith, 
superintendent of schools, Oak Park; on the curriculum handbook; 
Miss Ethel Kawin, guidance counselor at Glencoe, on "Foundations 
of Good Judgment"; Dr. Paul J. kisner, superintendent, Glencoe, 
"The Function of the bupervisor"; and Dr. Edwin Reeder, University 
of Illinois, "The Place ox the Supervisors' Association in Illinois." 

Host for the state meeting is Miss Mary Lntsmin ;er, associate 
professor in the Allyn Training School at the University. 

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Carbondale, 111., April -Irvin Peithman, manager of the 
Southern Illinois Normal University State Farm, will speak on 
the archaeology and anthropology program of the Illinois Stc te 
Academy of Science meeting at Peoria May 2-3 • 

Mr. Peithiiian will talk on "Recent Hooewell Finds in Southern 
Illinois." In 1940 he won one of three gold med£ 1 awards ■:iven 
by the Academy for outstanding research achievements in recognition 
of research work which he has done in Southern Illinois ar«h Oology 

studies have appeared at various times in arch, eologicr ] 
nublications during the past 15 years. 







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mmm ^ mmmmmmmmmam ^^^ mmmm ^^ m Southern Illinois 

________ Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. MHnHHBHMM^^^BnMHMHHHHHMBB 



4-17-47 

HOMEMAKING TIPS 

FROM SOUTHERN 

(A weekly column of suggestions for the homemaker from the Home 
Economics Department of Southern Illinois Normal University) 

Gladys Babcock, Assistant Professor of Home economics 

Warm weather will soon be here and with it will come increased 
difficulty in controlling household pests, particularly cockroaches, 
moths and ants. Starting a campaign against them immediately might 
prove to be wise economy of time later on because the;'" increase 
rapidly in any household. 

Sodium fluoride is the best all around cockrorch remedy. 
It is poisonous to man if taken internally in sufficient amounts 
and should bj kept out of food and away from children and pets. 
It can be sprinkled by hand along the back of drainboards, shelving 
etc. where roaches run. It kills chiefly as a stomach poison rnd 
remains effective indefinitely in dry places. 

Clothes moths destroy thousands of dollars of clothes annually. 
Dry cleaning and washing kill all forms of moths at the time of 
treatment but do not impart moth resistance. Glean clothes can be 
sealed in paper be gs and will be protected as long as the paper is 
unbroken. Scattering flake napthalene or paradichlorobenzene 
crystals between the folds of clothing is excellent treatment if 
they are kept in boxes with covers tightly closed. 

Ideal ant control is based on the destruction of the queens 
and the young in the nest itself. Locate the nest and merely pour 
one or two tablespoonfuls of carbon disulfide down the craci and 
report this after txventv four hours if necessary. 

Continued vigilance is nocess-ry to control household p^sts 
but the job can be done if a little time and s )i.ie effort is jiven 
to it. 






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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. HHBBi^^HHMHaBMHMI^HH^BHHI^BHM , 



4-17-47 
Carbqndale, 111., April -Ledford J. Bischof, graduate 
student at Southern Illinois Normal University end former vocational 
counselor at the U. S. Veterans Guidance Center, has received an 
appointment as graduate assistant at the Psychological Service Center 
at Syracuse University. 

Bischof, who has done psychological and Dsychometrical work in 
the Army and at Lorton Junior College, as well as in his capacity as 
a Southern faculty member assigned to the Veterans Guidance Center 
here, will receive his master of science in education degree in August. 

He will leave in September for Syracuse, where he will also work 
on his doctor's degree, majoring in personnel work and guidance. 

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Carbondale, 111., April — Arthur W. Gilliam, who completed work 
for the degree of bachelor of science in education at Southern Illinois 
Normal University, majoring in industrial education, has accepted a 
position as instructor of industrial education at the Lake County 
Sanitarium, Grown Point, Ind. 

Gilliam and Mrs* Gilliam will move to Crown Point April 23, 
when he will begin the work of organizing a program for training 
adults for special vocations. 

Gilliam, a veteran who served in the Army during World War II, 
formerly lived at Sesser. 

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Southern Illinois 
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4-17-47 



Carbondale, 111., April — With the weather and the telephone .strike 
working against them, the Southern Illinois ITormal University athletic department 
members have "been vainly attempting to get the spring sports program under way. 

Hormally at this time of the season, the mentors would he able to predict 
what kind of a season they were going to have, hut this year, not one of the 
four spring sports — baseball, track, tennis, and golf — have gotten under way. 

The baseball team came closest to prying the lid off as they went over four 
innings in a contest with Eastern Illinois Teachers last Tuesday, but a heavy 
rain caused the contest to be cancelled before it went into the books. 

On Saturday, the track team, coached by Leland P. "Doc" Lingle, will attempt 
to play host to the Evansville College thinclads, weather permitting. Lingle 1 s 
cinderpathers have been chafing at the delays and should be grimly determined to 
take advantage of any break the weather might give. 

IText Tuesday, Coach Lynn Holder' s golfers and Coach Bill Ereeburg' s netsters 
will entertain the Evansville golf and tennis team. Then on Saturday, April 26, 
Athletic Director and Baseball Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin and his basehall team 
will carry the fight into Evansville territory as they invade the Ace's diamond 
for a game. 

Martin is anxiously awaiting the above dates and hoping for fair weather " 
because he fears that the players will lose their "edge" if forced to postpone 
many more meets. He is having additional trouble in trying to reschedule these 
postponed meets since telephone service is lacking in many parts of the 
country. 

However, once spring sports get started at Southern, the pace should be 
terrific, as many of the cancelled meets will be squeezed in in the middle of 
the weeks. All Southern golf matches will be played on the Jackscn County 
Country Club, while the baseball teams will square off in Sportsman's Park in 
Murphy sb or o. 

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Information Service CARBOMDALE ' ,tL ™ ow 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■^^■Mi^^^^^^^^MB^^Mi^^^""™ , 



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WHY SENATE BILL 13 DELETING THE WORD "NORMAL" FROM THE NAME 
OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS NORMAL UNIVERSITY SHOULD BE ENACTED 

The name is not descript ive of the work done . 

The American Association of Teachers Colleges defines a normal school as one devoted exclusively to 
the preparation of teachers, "offering curricula of two or more years in length but not granting a 
degree". Southern Illinois Normal University has been granting degrees for many years, and in 1943 the 
General Assembly removed the legal restriction that required it to devote its efforts exclusively to the 
preparation of teachers. Southern Illinois Normal University grants bachelor's degrees in education, in 
liberal arts, and in vocations and professions, and master's degrees in education, yet its name implies 
none of these developments . 
Southern Illinois Normal University is already recognized as a university . 

The high quality and variety of work performed at Southern has caused it to be recognized by the 
North Central Association and placed in Group IV, their highest classification of institutions of higher 
learning. The General Assembly should do as much for the university as this great accrediting agency 
for all institutions of higher learning in twenty states has already done. 

This recognition has had no adverse effect upon Southern's teacher training program, which will 
undoubtedly continue to be its prime function. Southern is doing a better job of training teachers than 
ever before, now that students who have no teaching abilities or inclination are permitted to take other 
work, and students who are preparing to teach have a strengthened five-year program However, a univer- 
sity is defined as "an assemblage of colleges", and that is what Southern i^s, and as such it is recog- 
nized. Southern is not asking for more power than it now has; it is asking merely that its name describe 
the work it is already authorized to offer. 

In the past the General Assembly has recognized that the names of educational institutions should 
describe the work offered. 

For many years the University of Illinois was known as the "Illinois Industrial University". When 
this name no longer described the work offered, the General Assembly in 1885 changed it to the "Univer- 
sity of Illinois". 

The institutions of higher learning at Charleston, Macomb, and DeKalb were established as "normal 
schools". These names were changed to "teachers colleges" in 1921. Thus the institution at Macomb had 
its name changed from "Western Illinois State Normal School" to "Western Illinois State Teachers College." 
The General Assembly took similar action in regard to Charleston and DeKalb. This action was most 
appropriate, since by 1921 these institutions were offering degrees. By definition of the American 
Association of Teachers Colleges, a teachers college is an institution devoted exclusively to the pre- 
paration of teachers, and having "legal authority to grant a standard bachelor's degree". 

The enactment of Senate Bill 13 is strictly in accordance with precedents established by earlier 
General Assemblies. 

The name of Southern Illinois Normal University is a continuous embarrassment to its graduates . 

Deletion of the word "Normal" from the title would be a decided boon to the graduates of the insti- 
tution since they are continually embarrassed by the obsolete word. While this embarrassment is most 
acute to our graduates in liberal arts and vocations and professions, even teachers who present their 
degrees to prospective employers and registrars of graduate school outside the immediate vicinity served 
by the university, have to explain that this particular "normal" is different. Sometimes this explanation 
is accepted, but often graduates lose good positions which they are qualified to fill because the name 
of the institution does not describe the nature of the work done. 

Recruitment of faculty is made needlessly difficult . 

Especially during the last few years when university teachers have been so hard to get, Southern 
Illinois Normal University has lost many excellent teachers solely because the word "normal" in its name 
connoted an inferior institution not granting degrees. The administration of the university explains 
that this is not so, but it is a decided handicap to be continuously on the defensive. 
The name "Normal" is obsolete . 

It is doubtful if any degree-granting institution in the whole country, outside of the State of Illi- 
nois, has the word "Normal" in its title. It is damaging to the educational prestige not only of Southern 
Illinois but also of the State to have an institution with an old-fashioned and inconsistent name, which 
creates misleading impressions in the minds of other educators. 



Miss Mary Entsminger, associate professor in the Allyn Training 
School; Dr. Vera Peacock, professor of romance languages; and 
Mrs. Elizabeth Meehan, instructor in the training school. 
Miss Entsminger is first vice president of the state 
organization, while Miss Peacock is state membership chairman and 
president of the regional chapter in this are;;. Both led discussion 
groups, Mrs. Meehan is proT'.:m chairman for the local chanter. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






4-22-47 
Carbondale, 111., April -Charlene Sprankel of : w"aterloo, 
a senior at Southern Illinois Normal University, has accepted a 
graduate assistantship at the University of Illinois for next 
year, Dr. John Mayor, chairman of the Southern matJamematiCLS 
deoartment, has announced. 

Miss Sprankel will teach two classes and will take two-thirds 
of the normal load of graduate work. The assistantship carries a 
stipend of $1,100. 

Three other graduates of Southern are now assi stants in the 
mathematics department at the University of Illinois, one of whom 
is completing his doctor's decree this year, Dr. Mayor said. 

#rfir 

Carbondale, 111., April -Dr. Harold E. Briggs, professor 
and chairman of the history department of Southern Illinois 
Normal University, will attend the annual meeting of the Mississippi 
Valley Historical Association in Columbus, Ohio April 23-25. He is 
a member of the program committee. 

The paper which Dr , Briggs presented at last year's meeting 
will be oublished in the June issue of the Mi ssissippi Valley 
Historical Review . 

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Carbondale, 111., April -Three Southern faculty members 
attended the State convention of Delta Kaopa Gamma, honor society 
for orofessional teachers, in Peoria last week. These three were 
Miss Mary Entsmin^er, associate professor in the Allyn Training 
School; Dr. Vera Peacock, professor of romance lan, ;T ,ua^es; and 
Mrs. Elizabeth Meehan, instructor in the training school. 
Miss Entsminger is first vice president of the st^e 
organization, while Miss Peacock is state membership ch n and 
president of the regional chrpter in this area. Both lid discussion 
groups. Mrs. Meehan is program chairmrn for the local chanter. 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



4-22-47 

Carbondale, 111., April -The four concerts of next year's 
series under the auspices of the Carbondale Community Concert 
Association will be *iven by '.alter Cassel, baritone; Jennie Tourel, 
mezzo-soprano; Jesus-l-;aria Sanroma, pianist; and the Indianapolis 
Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Fabien Sevitzky, according to Mrs, 
V.A* Thalman, president of the concert organization. 

This outstanding list of attractions, headed by the first 
symphony orchestra to visit Carbondrle in twenty years, was made 
possible by the excellent results of the campaign. The committee 
had several hundred dollars more to spend than last year's record 
budget. This success the officers attribute to the good-sized 
contribution voted by the Southern Illinois Normal University 
entertainment committee and to the efforts of the seventy or more 
volunteer workers in Carbondale and many other communities. Of 
the cooperating towns Herrin will send the largest contingent to 
the musical events here next season; Loren Margrave of that city 
reports a total of 54 members. 

Sanroma is a great favorite among- pianists, satisfying alike 
to the discriminating listener and to the man who knows little 
about music. The brilliance of his style and his great versatility 
are admired in his many recordings and numerous concert and radio 
appearances. Jennie Tourel' 3 singing is a pure delight to all who 
hear her. She is noted for her fine interpretive sense, her lovely 
quality of tone, and her f lav/less style. Salter Cassel, on the 
other hand, is virile and robust, with a ?:reat popular appeal. He 
has toured the country in The Desert Song and other light operas, 
singing the leading roles. He has also done some work in grand 
opera. The Indianapolis Symphony has made a good many records and 
has been on several tours, which have strengthened its favorable 
reputation. 

Membership cards, good for admission to these four events will 

be sent out in the fall, at which time the dates will be announced. 

The orchestra date has already been set tentatively for honday, 
January 26, All concerts will be ^iven in the University Auditorium, 



Southern Illinois 
_ Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



4-22-47 
Carbondale, 111., April -Students at Southern Illinois 
Normal University v/ho were former Army officers will have the 
opportunity to apply for Regular Army appointment in promotion 
lists when a Screening Board comes to the campus in tiay, President 
Chester F. Lay has been notified. 

Veterans may apply in the following branches: Coast Artillery 
Corps, Cavalry, Field Artillery, Infantry, Corps of Engineers, 
Finance Department, Ordnance Department, Quartermaster Corps, 
Transportation Corps, Signal Corps, Ihemical Corps, and Corps of 
Military Police. 

Amplications should be submitted May 9, at the lien's Lounge. 
The Screening Board will visit the campus on May 19 to interview 
applicants . 

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Carbondale, 111., April -Dr. Dorothy Davies, associate 
of 

professor/physical education for 1 women at Southern Illinois Normal 

University, has been appointed chairman of the public relations 
committee for the Mid-West Association of University and College 
Teachers of Physical Education. The appointment is for two years. 

m 



Carbondale, 111., April -Robert TT . English, assistant 
professor of industrial education at Southern Illinois Normal 
University, has been notified that his article, "The American 
Standards Association's Contributions for Industrial Education, M will 
appear in the May issue of the A meric an Vocational Journ al. Mr. 
English recently addressed the Illinois Vocational Association on 
a similar subject, speaking particularly in connection with the 
teaching of technical drawing. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CMBOtlDALE ' 1LL " ,ols 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^MMM^^HMBBl^B^^^^Mi^^^"^ 






4-22-47 
Carbondale, 111., Aoril -A delegation of county school 
superintendents and county survey committee members from Southern 
Illinois left here Sunday to tour reorganized schools in Kentucky, 
Tennessee and West Virginia and South Carolina, under the leadership 
of several members of the College of Education faculty at Southern 
Illinois Normal University. 

Accompanying the group were Willis E. Lalone, F. W. Warren and 
Dr. Victor Randolph of the University faculty. 

This is the second tour of this sort for school officials rnd 
committees interested in reorganization, arranged by the University. 
Some 20 Southern Illinoisans , all from the southwestern ; 'block'" of 
counties, are making the trip. 

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Carbondale, 111., April -A lecture for parents of elementary 
school children on "What a Child May Expect of Its Parents' 1 ' will 
be presented by Southern Illinois Normal University Friday afternoon, 
April 25, at 2 o'clock in Shryock Auditorium. 

Speaker will be Miss Ethel Kawin, guidance counsellor for the 
public schools at Glencoe, 111., who is recognized as one of the 
country's outstanding counselors. 

Miss Kawin will be here for the State meeting of the Illinois 
Association of Supervisors and Directors of Instruction, which will 
be held on the University campus Friday and at Giant City St; te Park 
Friday ni?ht and Saturday. 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



S-oecial 



4-24-47 



Carbondale, 111., April —Students from 70 of the State's 102 counties and 
from 16 other states are currently enrolled at Southern Illinois Formal University, . 
a report from the Registrar's Office reveals* 

Total enrollment for the spring term no\v in session is 2,475, of whom 2,437 are 
Illinoisians and 38 are from out-of-state. 

States represented are: Missouri, 14 students; Indiana, 5; Arkansas, Kentucky, 
New York, Tennessee and Texas, two each; Alabama, California, Florida, G-eorgia, 
Michigan, Mississippi, Ohio, Washington, and Wisconsin, one each. 

The Illinois enrollment "by counties includes: 

Adams, 1 student; Alexander, 33; Bond, 6; Calhoun, 2; Christian, 1; Clark, 4; 
Clay, 22; Clinton, 16; Coles, 1; Cook, 32; Crawford, 9; DuPage, 2; Edgar, 1; Edwards, 
2; Effingham, 5; Payette, 20; Franklin, 300; Fulton, 1; Gallatin, 21; Green, 1; 
Grundy, 1; Hamilton, 31; Hancock, 1; Hardin, 12; Iroquis, 1; Jackson, 549. 

Jasper, 2; Jefferson, 64; Jersey, 2; Johnson, 41; Jones, 1; Kane, 1; Kendall, 
3; Lawrence, 9; Lee, 1; Logan, 1; Livingston, 1; Macon, 2; Macoupin, 27; Madison, 69; 
Marion, 61; Massac, 20; McLean, 2; Menard, 2; Menard, 2; Mercer, 1; Monroe, 15; 
Montgomery, 6; Morgan, 2; Peoria, 1; Perry, 114; Pike, 2; Pope, 16; Pulaski, 34; 

Randolph, 58; Richland, 2; Saline, 123; Sangamon, 3; Schuyler, 1; Shelby, 1 ; 
St. Clair, 102; Union, 98; Vermilion, 5; Wabash, 12; Washington, 32; Wayne, 52; 
Will, 2; White, 55; Williamson, 314, Winnabago, 1. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE ' ILLINOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^■^^^^■■■■■^^■■^^^■i 



4-24-47 
HOMEMaKING tips 

FROM SOUTHERN 

(A weekly column of suggestions for the homemaker from the Home 

Economics Department of Southern Illinois Normal University) 

By Mrsi Mary Louise Barnes, Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

According to restaurateurs in Chicago approximately 90' per^^nt of 
the office workers, clerks, and bosses too, drop in for a so-called 
"second breakfast" of a quick cup of coffee at ten o'clock each 
morning. 

This snack half-way between h hasty breakfast and a crowded 
lunch hour "relieves their fatigue, increases accuracy and relaxes 
nervous tension," says the Coffee Advertising Council. (N.Y.) 

You have read the popular article reprinted in the Reader's 
Digest which attempts to prove that coffee only keeps you awake at 
night if you know you are drinking it but when milk has Caffeine 
added and you do not know it, you sleep soundly. 

here is what one well-known home economist, Jean Bogert, says 
about the use of coffee: "The physiological effect of caffeine" 
vrries because (a) "the sensitiveness of different individuals to 
caffeine varies greatly,"; (b) "the reactions of the body to the 
drug vary with the dose." A small dose of any drug for a very 
sensitive person is equal to a large dose to one less affected by 
or more accustomed to the drug. 






• « . ■ • •;.... 



She goes on to say that the usual effects of a moderate dose 
of crffeine on a person of average sensitiveness are "to quicken 
respiration, strengthen the pulse, slightly raise the blood pressure, 
stimulate secretion from the kidney, mildly excite the brain, and 
do away with any feeling of fatigue or depression which may be 
present. ;v 

People who cannot start the day refreshed r:nd full of vim find 
the coffee-for-breakfast habit ;:n advantage since it may "stimulate 
a slightly low blood pressure and sub-normal temperature, and revive 
a jaded soirit." 

As to the advisability of between-meal coffee or the development 
of the coffee habit, it substitutes or replaces much i,.ore nourishing 
foods and can be a contributing cause of mal-nutrition. 

Its stimulating effect enables a person to disregard fatigue 
because this is offset by the excitement created by the caffeine, and 
the prooer rest is not taken. This fatigue becomes cumulative. Our 
ranid pace of living requires increased rest-not the type of relief 

I from fatigue that caffeine gives. 
One would be foolish to attempt to recommend that the people of 

the U.S., who drink 1/3 of the world's coffee supply, abstain from it 
on health grounds. But peoole who do not profit from its use should 
be warned to use it in moderation, and to use it in addition to a 
balanced diet and not as a food in itself, for it has no food value 
except as we add cream or sugar. 

Children's growth is stunted because of malnutrition. Dr. 
Emerson, in r study of "puny 7 ' children found that 72 per cent of 
those examined by him used either coffee or tea. The child's nervous 
system is too unstable to allow the use of so stimulating a drug. 

Adults whose nervous reserve is deoleted or who are sensitive, 
nervously unstable individuals will be harmed by over-indulgence in 
coffee. It makes them tense and irritable and they often do not 
realize that they . re injuring their health. 

Mien coffee is improoerly made by boiling, remaining in contact 
with the grounds too long, over-percolation or too strong a brew, 
the bitter tannins extracted are bad for digestion. 






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^ ^^ amm w ^^ m ^ m ^^^ Southern Illinois 
. Normal University 

Information Service c«io»«nuu.on 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



4-24-47 

Carbondale, 111., April -Southern Illinois Normal University 
has been pi-iced on the accredited list of the American Assoc iation 
ol r 'eachers Colleges for 1947-4$, University President Chester F. 
Lay has been notified. 

This listing is in recognition of the University's College of 
Education. 

TTifff 

Carbondale, 111., April -The ''Little Symphony," a string 
trio composed of three faculty members, will present a concert at 
Southern Illinois Normal University April 30, in the Little Theater. 

The trio is composed of Mrs. Helen E. Matthes, piano; Eileen 
Barry, cello; and Maurits Kesnar, violin. 

This concert is open to the public and is one of a number of 
recitals and concerts arranged to acquaint the people of Southern 
Illinois with the work of the University's music department, 
according to Dr. Kesnar, chairman of the deoartrnent. 

A concert by the University Orchestra is scheduled for May 7. 

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Carbondale, 111., April -A state conference of the Illinois 
Country Youth Association will be held at Southern Illinois Normal 
University here May 9-10, according to George Bracewell, University 
associate professor of rural education. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



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Information Service CARBONDALE ' ttUMM 

lorena drummond, ed. i^tm^^mmm^^MK^^^^mm^^^^^^mm 



Special to Dailies 4-24-47 



Carbondale, 111., April —Saturday will "be a "big day for the varsity sports 
teams at Southern Illinois Normal University — baseball, track, and tennis — as each 
team plans to display its wares, weather permitting. 

The baseball team, under the direction of Glenn "Abe" Martin, the only one of 
the four who hasn't completed an official game on the books this season, is scheduled 
to tangle with the Evansville Aces at Evansville. 

Martin has indicated that Freddie Brenzel, righthander from Staunton, will get 
the starting nod, with Harry "Bud" Grater of Carbondale, and Bernard Keilingensten 
of Freeburg standing by in emergency. 

The track and tennis teams will journey to State Normal for meets in their 
respective sports. Lelend P. "Doc" Lingle's track team will engage in a dual meet 
with Normal at McCormick Field at three p.m. while Bill Freeburg' s netsters will 
tangle with the Redbirds earlier in the afternoon. 

The Lingle-men will be in quest of their second win in as many starts in this 
season, as they romped over Evansville 119 to 12 last week in a dual meet at 
Southern. Lingle will be couting on such speedsters as Dick Newby of Ridgefarm, 
Ray Hanks of Crossville, John Algee of Carbondale, Charles 3eatty of Benton, George 
Beltz of Marion, and Leonard Burden in the track events. Beltz broke a track record 
in the 880 yard run against Evansville, clipping the distance in 2 : ©2 • 7 . 

In the field events, Charles Mathiew of Eldorado, Jeff Mitchell of Zeigler, 
James Cole of Norris City, ITorris Garner of Wayne City, and Adrian Stonecipher of 
Salem will carry the chief leads. The relay team is made up of Carl 3irkner of 
Pinckneyville, John Brake of Du Quoin, Hanks, p.nd Beltz. 

In the tennis meet, Captain Joe Pulley of Marion, Roy Leilich of New Athens, 
and John Maguire and Ray Fulkerson of Carbondale are scheduled to play the leading 
roles, each turning in an easy win against the Evanaville netsters last Tuesday. 

* # # 



m ^^^ m ^ mm ^^^ a ^ m ^ m ^^ Southern Illinois 

______«« Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE ' 1LUMO ' 3 

lorkna drummond, ed. m^t^^m^mm^m^i^ammm^^a^^^am 



4-30-47 

Garbondale, 111., May -Approximately 75 young people from 
all over Illinois will gather here May 9-10 for a state conference 
of the Illinois Country Youth Association as guests of Southern 
Illinois Norma.! University. 

Theme for the two-day conference will be "Illinois Rural Youth 
P?ce the Problems of 1947-43. ?i 

On Saturday, May 10, an additional contingent of members of 
Country Rural Youth Groups from all parts of the state is expected 
to arrive to share in the discussions -■nd recreational activities, 
according to George Bracewell, associate professor of rural education 
at Southern and chairman of the committee on arrangements. 

Discussi )ij leaders include Dr. D. L. Bailey of Western Illinois 
State Teacher"! College, Macomb; F. L. Breen, director of East Bay 
Camp, Blooming on; Dr. Hans C. Olsen, Eastern Illinois State Teachers 
College, Charleston; and Dr. Eugene R. Fair, dean, College of Education 
here at Southern. 

Various recreational activities will be in charge of rural youth 
clubs from the University of Illinois, Illinois State Normal University 
and Eastern Illinois State Teachers College. 

If tiff 

Carbondale, 111., May -Dick Harmon from Granite City, 
graduating senior at Southern Illinois Normal University, has accepted 
a position as basketball and physicrl educrtion instructor at ' 'ayne 
City high school, the University athletic department has announced. 

Harmon lettered three yuars in track -nd basketball at Southern, 
and was vice president of the ''I 1 ' Club. He was also vice-r>rasident 
of his junior class and vice-president of the Kappa Delta Alpha 
frrternity. He was a member of the brsketball team that won 
Southern's first Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, and 
went >n to win the National Assoc i:;t ion Intercollugi be Basketball 
tourney. 



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Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



(Note to Editor: This is one of a series of articles on school 
reorganization problems prepared by Southern's Committee on School 
Reorganization. ) 

4-30-47 

Carbondale, 111-, May -The small high school is ''one of the 
most urgent and most difficult problems facing school reorganization 
in Illinois," believes Dr. Earl R. Hall, specialist in school 
reorganization ?.t Southern Illinois Normal University. 

Illinois has more small high schools in proportion to population 
thin have other states, Dr. Hall said. Statistics from the State 
Department of Public Instruction for 1946 sI.ot that Illinois has Si 
high schools with 25 or fewer pupils enrolled, 'i.C'7 with 50 or loss, 
444 with 100 or less and 579 with 150 or fower pupils. In other 
words, almost hal.f. of. the high schools have loss than 75 pupils 
a n d t h re o f o u r b h s h ? v o f e we r than 150 pupils* 

"Standards throughout the country show the need for a high 
school with an enrollment of from 230 to 300 pupils with a faculty 
of 10 to 12 teachers," Dr^ Hall pointed out. "Illinois is falling 
far short of this goal. It has 721 high schools that do not meet 
this standard.'' 

"It may be impossible to reach this goal in some instances but 
in most cases the small high school is not justified when we consider 
density of population, transportation facilities and other factors 
which might influence the formation of larger schools. ?i 

Many of the small high schools cost from ^250 to ^300 per pupil 
while most larger schools operate on $150 or loss per pupil, the 
school reorganization specialist explained. 

"The small high school is too costly," he declared. Furthermore, 
tho- small high schools do not offer a broad enough curriculum, to 
meet the needs of society today. Illinois can have better schools 
for its educ'tional dollar if it wishes to do so. One way is to 
eliminate most of its small high schools by reorgrnizing into lorg^r 
units." 






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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE ' ««»oii 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■^■■■■■^■■■■■■■■^■■■■■■B 



Special to Dailies 4-30-47 



Carbondale, 111., April —One of the greatest needs at Southern Illinois 
Normal University is a new library "building, according to the faculty long term 
planning committee and the advisory committee to the president, which have jointly 
considered requests to he made to the General Assembly for "milling funds. 

The following statement by Dr r Howard 3. Bosley, director of the University 
library, explains the present crowded library facilities; 

"The University Library is housed in an old building, constructed in 1903 when 
Southern was a junior college with 300 college and high school students enrolled. 

"The University Library building can seat approximately 200 students in its 
reading rooms, only l/l2 of the student body. This extremely overcrowded condition 
results in lack of study opportunities, and without question is interfering with the 
attainment of high scholastic standards at Southern. 

"Authorities rc-conmend that a university library seat from l/3 to l/2 the 
student body. The library reading rooms at Southern should seat at least 1,000 
persons, and since no reading room should be crowded to capacity, a seating space 
for 1,500 students would be better. These figures are based upon present 
enrollment and do not take into account possible increases in the future. 

"Several high schools in Southern Illinois have a seating capacity in their 
library reading rooms equal to Southern 1 s Wheeler Library. 

"The present library building is a fire trap. Its fine collections of books 
and other materials are in constant danger of destruction by fire. Has anyone 
considered the inevitable impact of such a catastrophe on university life? It is 
likely that at least ten years time would be required under the best of conditions 
to rebuild the present collection of reading materials to anything approaching 
its present size. A large part of the reading materials now in daily use could 
not be replaced at all. 

"The presence of this constant danger that the University Library may be 

(more) 



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destroyed by fire should constitute a major worry of the college 
administration and faculty. Few university libraries are so unprotected. 

"The present building was not designed to bear up under the tons of 
weight of the 80,000 volumes now housed in it. Continued use may result 
in more stress than the old walla and floors can carry. This condition 
could result in disaster and loss of life. 

"Book storage space is inadequate for further growth. The present 
rate of "book buying requires the addition of approximately one-fifth of 
a mile of bookshelves each year. 17o additional space is available for 
such shelves., unless they are crowded into the already inadequate reading 
rooms. 

"The present building allows no space for additional library staff 
members. The University Library should have one or more full-time 
reference librarians, one or more documents librarians, and other additions. 
There is no space in the present "building in which such people can work* 

"Inadequate plant facilities for library purposes are hampering the 
development of scholastic excellence at Southern. This state of affairs 
must not be allowed to continue." 

# # # # # 









Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBOMDALli ' UL1HO ' 3 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^■^^■^■■■^■^■^■^■i^"" 



5-1-47 

Carbondale, 111., May -The foe of Southern Illinois Normal 
University sports teams this week-end will be the Eastern Illinois 
State Teachers of Charleston. 

The track team, under the direction of Leland P, "Doc" Lingle, 
and the tennis squad, under the tutorship of Bill Freeburg, will 
play host to the resoective te^ms of the Panthers on Saturday, while 
Glenn "Abe' 1 '' Martin will take his baseball team to Charleston to 
engage the Easterners in a brace of contests. 

The tracksters will be after their third consecutive win of the 
season, and also their second consecutive conference victory. The 
netsters, likewise, will be looking for victory number three, and 
loop win number two. 

The baseball nine, with one game under its belt, will get into 
league competition for the first time this season at Eastern. The 
other game won was at the expense of Evansville College 7-4. The 
Maroons played four innings with the Easterners last month, a game 
which the Panthers were leading until rain stopped the fray. 

The track team, which holds wins over State Normal and Evansville 
College, is a well-balanced outfit which has won both meets by 
comfortable margins. 

The tennis squad, also holding wins over the same outfits as 
the thinclads, is reported to have a "powerhouse 7 *' in the net world, 
and even this early in the season are being favored to repeat their 
Illinois Inter-Collegiate Athletic Conference win of last year. 

The golf team, under the direction of Lynn Holder, is idle this 
week, with their next appearance being scheduled for May 9 against 
Shurtleff College of Alton* 















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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE ' ILL1MO ' s 

lorena drummond, ed. ■^■■■^^■■^■^^^■^■■^■■■b 



5-1-47 

Carbondale, 111., May -Hearing on the bills proposing to 
change the name of Southern Illinois Normal University to Southern 
Illinois University has been set for May 13 by the education 
committee of the House, University officials have learned. 

These bills, first introduced in the Senate by Sen. R. G. 
Crisenberry of Murphysboro, pasoed the upper legislative body by a 
vote of 35 to 3» 

Keen interest in the proposed change of name is evidenced by 
University officials, students and faculty, as well as alumni. 

"' T e are pleased that the Senate passed the bills by such an 
overwhelming majority, " University President Chester F. Lay said, 
"and hope that members of the House will be equally concerned about 
the future of this institution.'" 

Elimination of the word "normal" from Southern* s name is 
sought to bring the name in conformity with the institution's 
present functions, those of a university. The word "normal" means 
a two-year institution devotod to teacher-education. Southern now 
offers degrees in three undergraduate colleges and a Graduate 
School. 



5-7-47 
Carbondalo, 111., Hay -Glenn "Abe" Martin, athletic director 
at Southern Illinois Normal University, attended a meeting of Ill- 
inois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference athletic directors in 
Bloomington on honday, may 5, the athletic department announced. 

### 

Carbondale, 111., iiay -Due to teaching obligations at South- 
ern Illinois Normal University, Athletic Director Glenn w Abe i? Martin 
has been forced to refuse the position of baseball instructor at the 
Jack Rossiter Baseball School, which will conduct classes at Taylor- 
ville, Illinois, Juno 1-July 1, the athletic department has announced. 

Carbondale, ill., May -Southern Illinois Normal University 
Basketball Coach Lynn C. Holder, and his 1946-47 Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference basketball champs were the guests of the Carbon- 
Bale Lions Club at their last meeting. 

Holder, who was the most speaker, told th^ audience oi his 
team's play during the past season, and also introduced each member 
of the squad, who was present. 

The two seniors present, John Sebastian of Odin and Sam 
i.iloe^vich of Zeigler, also spoke to the group. The third senior, 
Gene Hall of Galatia, was unable to attend as he has alreauy accepted 
:. job as co ch at Sterling high school. 



5-7-47 

Carbondale, 111., May -Coach Lynn Holder's Southern 
Illinois Normal University golfers will lay out the Welcome mat 
for Jhurtloff College on Friday, Hay 9, as the two teams will 
battle it out in a nor conference fray on Jackson Country Club 
greens at 1 p.m. 

The Hilltopers will invade the territory of a maroon team 
which has just begun to hit its stride, as was shown by last 
w^kend T s clear-cut victory over Arkansas Statu. 

Main performers for the Southerners ar~ Oliver Sh aff of Mt. 
Carmel, John Deadman of Carbondale, Jimmy John of lit. Carmel, 
and Ward Armstrong of Hoopeston. 

This is th^ last scheduled match for the Holder-men before 
thm confcrmcu meet at De Kalb on May 17. 

[ M 

Carbondale, 111. The 1947 football schedule, still subject 
to aoproval of the Faculty Athletic Committee for Southern Illinois 
Normal University, ha., been released by Athletic Director Glenn 
"Abe" Martin. 

The Maroons, holders of second place in the Illinois Inter- 
collegiate Athletic Conference last season, has scheduled seven 
games, plus an eighth that is still tentative. 
Tentative Schedule: 

Octob-.r 4 Svansvillw Colic at Carbv>nda."L 

11 Indiana £t." t Univ ;■ ,:--'•• -ute, Indiana 

IS Western Illinois " Macomb 

25 Northern Illinois (Homecoming ) Carl: Le 

November 1 Arkansas State " Jon^sboro, Arkansas 

# Illinois Normal " Normal, Illinois 

15 eastern Illinois " CarbDndale 

22 Maryville (T..nnJ Collude" Carbondale 

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5-12-47 

Carbondale, 111., May -Not all the glory sjoes to the actors 
who strut before the footlights. 

It takes about five crew-men to every actor to nut on '"'State of 
the Union, ;f which the Little Theater at Southern Illinois Normal 
University will stage May 15-16, 

There are 15 "stars" in the cast who will take bows before the 
fo?tli?hts, but there are 75 students who have done just as much hard 
work—stagehands, property crew, light crew, sound crew, make-up crew, 
costume crew, rehearsal crew, business staff and publicity staff. 

The efforts of these of f-stage workers is just as essential to 
the success of the nlay as are the dramatics of the actors on-stage, 
according to Dr. P. Merville Larson, director of the play. 

The crews for "State of the Union' include the following: 
Stage Crew Imogene dray, Chairman- Granite City 



Barry Rife - Anna 

Rusty Chaney - Avondale, Georgia 

Carrie T /ard - Alton 

Leonard Snadden - Caseyville 

Madge Crum - Granite City 

Ed Melvin - Tamaroa 

John Fitzgerald - Cairo 

Kathryn Schleper - DuQuoin 

Curt Englebright - Carmi 

Dick Avis - Johnston City 

Mary B. Huss - Sparta 

John Mul^in - Herrin 

Billie R. Schwegman - Herrin 



Paul Ash - Salem 
Bonnie Bateman - Carbondale 
Don 3itz - Mound City 
Lois Foltz - Potoka 
Ed Metzner - Fairfield 
Hannah L. Trout - Carbondale 
Charlotte "Jaggener - Herrin 
William Arensman - metropolis 
Gerald Carr - East St. Louis 
John Chumley - Coffe^n 
Pat Tope - murphysboro 
Rosemary Woblard - Energy 



l! 



Property Crew John Koonce, Chairman - T Jatseka 

Wanda Clark - West Frankfort Phyllis Austin - Carbondale 

Virgil Snruell - Albion Marilyn Henderson - Marion 

Dorthea Gahan - Flora Helen Holmes - Carterville 

Dick Woods - Mt . Carrnel Joan Eaton - Carbondale 

Light Crew Jeanne Haroldson, Chairman- Carbondale 

John E. Dornback - Belleville Vernie Harnett- Metropolis 
Richard Osland - East St. Louis Bob Mantle - East St. Louis 
Ruth Britt - Collinsville Russ Fairbairn - East St. Louis 

Sound Crew Bill Williamson, Chairman - Decatur 

Mary Lou Hartwell - Marion George E. Lunde - Carbondale 

Make-Up Crew Sue Brummett, Chairman - Litchfield 

Katie Alley - Sparta Jane Kimmel - Wood River 

Lou Walker - Homewood 

Costume Crew Helen Perryman, Chairman - Carbondale 

Marietta Maisel - East St. Louis Mary Webber - Wood River 
Jackie Dennis - Collinsville Ramona Pe^k - Benton 
Malcomb Hamby - Metropolis 

Rehearsal Crew Dorothy Coleman, Chairman - Carbondale 

Peggy Coleman - Marion Doris Burkitt - Benton 

Jean E. Armentrout - Benton Bobbie Ingram - Carbondale 
Doris Schwinn - DuQuoin 

Business Staff Lois Maxine Sprinkle and Barbara Haroldson, 

Marion (Chairmen) Carbondale 

Gladys Ruth Taylor - Benton Matilda Smith - Wilmette 
Betty Lou Hill - Benton 

Publicity Staff Alice Maisel, Chairman - East St. Louis 

Judy Ferguson - Edwardsville Dora Le« McGowan - East St. Louis 
Jack Walker - Mt. Vernon Pat Curtin - Carbondale 

Carlos Pleshe - Buckner Betsey DeShon - East St. Louis 






May 12, 1947 

Carbondale, 111., May - Miss Athylin Harris of Granc Chair, 
a student at Southern Illinois Normal University, recently was 
honored by the Dodd Equipment Company of Chicago when she was pre- 
sented with the county frozen foods award made by the company to 
winners in 4-H Club work. 

Miss Harris was asked to be present at the opening of the 
company's new branch in Cairo, where the award was presented to her. 

ffWii ;. .. ./ ftUTHt 

Carbondale, 111,, May - Two Southern Illinois Normal University 
staff members have been elected to posts in the Illinois Academy of 
Science. 

Dr. Walter B. Welch, associate professor and chairman of the 
University botany department, was selected chairman of the botany 
section of the Academy, and Irvin^ Peithman, manager of the Univer- 
sity Farm was chosen to head the archaeology and anthropology section. 

Mr. Peithman is also a director in the Illinois A r chaeological 
Society. 

ft w, it a if if it 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Director 



HOMEMAKING TIPS 

FROM SOUTHERN 

(A weekly column of suggestions for the homemaker from the Home 
Economics Department of Southern Illinois Normal University) 

Don't Shrink Your Blankets 

by Lucy K. Woody, Professor of Home Economics at Southern Illinois 

Normal University. 

It may well be that unshrinkable wool blankets will be on the 
market some day but they are not in most of* our homes yet. Until that 
time, care must be taken to avoid shrinking what we have. And this 
is not only because we don't want to have them become so short that 
they will not remain tucked in at the foot but also because they lose 
warmth as they shrink. 

It is true that, as they shrink, they become thicker, a fact 
which might lead one to suppose they would be warmer. On the contrary, 
*they may not be as warm. The reason for thi$j is that, as they shrink, 
the spaces between the threads and the space s> among the fibers become 
smaller and are unable to hold as much air as before. In addition, 
the nap flattens down and becomes entangled w£th the body of the 
fabric closing up the spaces among the napped fibers too. 

The point is that still air is a poor conductor of heat and the 
thicker that layer of still air imprisoned in t*he blanket the less 
the heat loss by conduction. 

Since it is almost impossible to avoid some shrinkage in even the 
most carefully washed, the best way to keep froln shrinking blankets 
is obviously not to wash them at all. This may mean tho alternative 
process of dry cleaning which does not alter sispe nor air spaces; but 
which is more expensive. In addition, it does not free the blanket 
of sooty soil as well as washing does. 

There remains the very practical expedient of postponing any 
kind of cleaning b~ r protection from soil throu^out service. One 
method is the use of a twelve-inch washable covering tacked over the 
end most 1 ekelv to come in contact with hands and face. Another is 



_ 



to cover the wholv, blanket with a supple material which can be washed. 
Placing the blanket between othur covers avoids exposure to dust and 
usin ; °; sheets lonn; enough to turn back a generous amount over other 
covers affords protection. 

Postpone washing; then wash carefully. 












Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Director 



5-3-47 

Carbondale, 111., May -Baseball and tennis teams of Southern 
Illinois Normal University will be "at home" to the respective teams 
from Shurtleff College of Alton on Saturday afternoon* The tennis 
team will invade the domain of Indiana State Netters on the same day 
for a non-conference meet. 

The baseball team, under the direction of Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin, 
will go into action at 3 p.m. at Riverside Park in Murphysboro against 
the Hilltoppers, while track and field activities will get under way 
at 1:30 p.m. in Mc Andrew Stadium. 

Lingle's thine lads and Freeburg's racketeers will be on the 
lookout for fourth wins of the season against no losses, while the 
baseball team, will be seeking its second collegiate win in five 
game s . 

Both contests with Shurtleff are non-loop affairs. 



u ii h U 



Carbondale, 111., May -A track meet for Southern Illinois 
high school track stars will be held here May 17, with University 
High School at Southern Illinois Normal University, as host, Frank 
Bridges, U. High coach, has announced. 

Cindermen from high schools in 15 Southern Illinois counties 
are expected to attend. 






Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drumi.iond, Director 



5-2-47 

Carbondale, 111., May -One of the first non-professional 
productions in the Middle T . T est of "State of the Union," by Lindsay 
and Crouse, will be given by the Little Theater of Southern Illinois 
Normal University here May 15-16, 

Two performances will be given by the Little Theater, each at 
S p.m. in Shryock Auditorium. 

The production here is directed by Dr. P. M. Larson, chairman 
of the speech department. 

Leads in the olay will be taken by John S. Rendleman of Anna as 
"Grant Matthews", Phyllis Johnson of DuQuoin as "Mary Matthews," his 
wife, and Dale Kittle of TT ayne City as "James Conover". Other 
members of the cast include Barbara Schwartz of Carbondale as 
"Katherine Thorndyke"; Lewis Hammack of Sparta as "Spike McManees"; 
Robert Wright of Zeigler as the Bellboy; Ralph Lane of Eldorado as 
the Butler; W« K. Sisk of Carbondale as "Sam Parrish"; Charles Weber 
of Cairo as "Judge Jefferson Davis Alexander"; Neva Woolard Isbell 
of T[ est Frenkfort as the Judge's wife, "Lulubelle"; Pat Rose of 
Carbondale as "Mrs. Draper"; Bill Price of Texico as "'Senator 
Lauterback"; Jerome Seltzer of Altamont as "William Hardy." 

it., u itu 

Carbondale, 111., May -The annual Inter-Fraternity Sing will 
be held at Southern Illinois Normal University Tuesday evening, May 
13, at 7 p.m. 

Five fraternities and three sororities will compete, each offerin 
three selections. A cup will go to the winning sorority, and a 
olaque to the winning fraternity. Both awards are provided by the 
Inter-Fraternity Council, sponsor of the ev^nt. 

The Sing is held on the steps in front of Shryoc/ Auditorium, 
The public is invited. 

#rt 



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RADIO CALENDAR 






Programs presented by Southern Illinois Normal University 

FRIDAY MAY 9 



WCIL - 2:15-2:30 p.m, 



, "Southern Comes Calling," Featuring Ben Watkins, 
assistant professor of art, Speaking on 
"Creative Ceramics 7 '. Student announcer, Joan 
Rhodes, St. Louis. 

WJPF - 2:30-3:00 p.m., "Education Time," featuring the South Side 
WEBQ Elementary School of Herrin. School represen- 

tatives Mrs. Betty Boatwright, music supervisor; 
H.V." Ellis, principal; Mrs. Mamie Vollett, 
teacher. Southern students participating- 
Rose Price, Carbondale, pianist; Mary Beth 
Huss, Sparta, "story lady"; Howard Goin, 
McLeansboro, vocalist; Student announcer, 
Robert Curtis, Carbondale. 



WCIL - 2:15-2:30 p.m. 



WCIL - 2:15-2:30 p.m, 



MONDAY kAY 12 

"Music is Yours," featuring the student 
quartette of the music department - Paul 
Margelli, '/est Frankfort, first tenor; Norman 
Rodenberg of Waterloo, second tenor; Bill 
Ledbetter, Murphysboro, first bass; Gene 
Howey, Fairfield, second bass; Charles Ablett 
Metropolis, accompanist; Floyd V. lakeland, 
music department, director; Student announcer, 
Charlotte Waggener, Herrin. 

TUESDAY MAY 13 

"Student Newscast," featuring journalism 
students, John Mulkin, Herrin; Fenton Harris, 
Tamaroa; Bill Price, Texico. Student 
announcer, Robert Dunhouse, Sparta. 

WEDNESDAY MAY 14 

WCIL - 2:15-2:30 p.m., "Campus Chatter," presenting the Fotos Club 

with Loretta Crider, Duquoin; Emma Welsh, 
Carbondale; Mildred Waidelis, Harrisburg; 
Monroe Taylor, Granito City; Howard Pepple, 
Bridgeport; George Cummings, Alton; Thomas 
Chester and John Chester, Ozark, participating, 
Student announcer, Doris Schwinn, Duquoin. 

WJPF - 7:15-7:30 p.m., "The Southern Hour," with College of Education 

round tablu discussion of "Teaching is fun." 
Student announcer, Bill Price, Texico. 

THURSDAY MAY I5 

WCIL - 2:15-2:30 p.m., "Little Theatre," presenting "Thou Art The 

Man," starring Neva Isbell, West Frankfort; 
John Koonct;, Watseka; U.K. Sisk, Carbondale; 
Bill Price of Texico. Student announcer, 
Barbara Schwartz, Carbondale. 



J*^ 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Director 



5-12-47 

Carbondale, 111., May -One of the "big w events of the year for 
music students at Southern Illinois Normal University is the spring 
tour to apnear before high school and civic audiences in Southern 
Illinois. 

This year, three vocal groups will make the two-de. y tour, starting 
Wednesday, May 14. 

The University A Cappella Choir, a 6#-voice chorus under the 
direction of Floyd V. Wakeland, associate professor of music, will be 
accompanied by the Madrigal Singers and by the quartet from the 
Southern Men f s Music Club, 

These groups will sing Wednesday at the high schools of Christopher, 
Benton, Mt. Vernon, and Fairfield, and on Thursday will appear at 
Eldorado, Harrisburg and Carrier Mills high schools. On Thursday 
evening they will present a program at the First Baptist Church at 
Herrin. 

Members of* the three groups include: 

A Cappella Choir 
1st Soprano 



Lois Ackerman ~ Red Bud Norma Giddings 

Leona Becker Johnston City Mary Lou Lawder 

Lorraine Carrington . Carbondale Kathryn Middleton 

Magdalen Ehresmann Prairie du Rocher Alice Newhouse 



VJilma ^Isdon 
Patricia Fields 
Virginia Sikkel 



Evelyn Burpo 
Florence Grim 
Betty Jo Finley 
Catherine Gibbs 



Catherine Bell 
Helen Dick 
Mary E. Davis 
Bridgett Gillespie 
Eloise McCoy 



Yolande Byassee 
Madge Collins 
Joy Har.^rav^ 
Marie Kern 



West Frankfort 

West Frankfort 

Carbondale 



JaNeva Porter 

B i 1 1 i e R . S c hwe gman 

Mavis Turner 



2nd Soprano 
West Frankfort Bobbie Ingram 

Carbondale Carolyn Miller 
Cape Girardeau Lanora Sills 

Carbondale Jane Somers 

1st Alto 

Johnston City Virginia Nelson 

Herrin Rose Price 

D owe; 11 Martha Spear 

West Frankfort Roberta V'he^ler 
Herrin 



Carbondale 

Murphy sb or o 

Xenia 

Cobuen 

McLeansboro 

Herrin 

Marion 



Carbondale 

Herrin 

Salem 

Clayton 



Carbondale 
Carbondale 

Carbondale 
Carlinville 



2nd Alto 
Cr^al Springs Helen Plumlee Cambria 

Murphysboro Charlotte Raubach West Frankfort 
kieigler Carol Werner LV.llevillo 
Mt. Vernon 









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James Baugher 
James Cochran 
James Griggs 
Cletus Jones 



Charles_Ablett 
Warren Elliott 
Harry Jackson 
Gaillard Krewer 
John Mulkin 



1st Tenor 

Eldorado 

Murphysboro 

Carbondale 

Harrisburg 

2nd Tenor 

Metropolis 

Wood River 

Chester 

Valmeyer 

Herrin 



Paul L. Margelli West Frankfort 
Ed Melvin Tamaroa 

Ray Sikkel Carbondale 

Ray Springs Herrin 



Robert Murphy 
Fred Propst 
Norman Rodenberg 
Billy G. Williams 



Herrin 

Mt • Vernon 

Waterloo 

Harrisburg 



1st Bass 



M. G. Bunfill 
Jack Fiscus 
Frank Groves 
Ro^er Hughes 



Rushville 

Carlyle 

Carterville 

Herrin 



Bill Ledbetter 
Carl Lutes 
Kenneth Rushing 
Gene Thompson 



Murphysboro 

Christopher 

Herrin 

Zeigler 



Norval Lee Bard 

Gene Howey 

David H. Mcintosh 



2nd Bas c . 
Hurst 
Fairfield 
Carbondale 



Bill Morse 
Ivan Swan 



Cambria 
Marion 



Madrigal Singers 

Lorraine Carrington, Patricia Fields, Bobbie Ingram, Roberta Wheeler, 
Charlotte Raubach, Martha Spear, Carol Werner, Ed Melvin, John Mulkin, 
Gene Howey, David H. Mcintosh. 

Men's Club Quartet 



Paul L. Margelli, Normal Rodenberg, Bill Ledbetter, Gene Howey, Charles 
Ablett, Accompanist. 



SPECIAL RELEASE TO ALL DAILIES 

5-1U-U7 

Carbondale, 111., May - Bills changing the name of Southern Illinois 
Normal University to Southern Illinois University were reported favorably by 
the House Education Committee on Tuesday. The vote on the bills was 16 to 0. 
Two members of the committee voted present, but all other members agreed that 
these bills should pass. 

The bills were introduced in the Senate by Senator R. G. Crisenberry of 
I.lurphysboro, and were passed by the Senate on April 16 by a vote of 36 to 3« 
With the recommendation of the House Education Committee that the bills pass, 
all that remains to complete action is final vote by the entire House of 
Representatives, and approval by Governor Green, 

The bills were presented to the Education Committee by Representative 
Robert J. Branson of Centralia, and Representative W. B. Westbrook of 
Harrisburg. 

IHffiHHHHHHm 






5-14-47 

Carbondale, 111., May -Acquisition of 194 1/2 acres of la^id 
south of the present campus has been completed by Southern Illinois 
Normal University, University President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

This property is all known as the Thompson property, and includes 
two residences and frontage on Thompson Lake. The latter frontage ha| 
been purchased subject to a lease including riparian rights still 
held by the Thompson's Lake Fishing Club. 

Embraced in the property is a residence on South Thompson Street, 
a 26-acre tract on which is located a barn and shed, a 75-acre tract 
with house, another 75-acre tract and. an 18 l/2-acre tract, neither 
with improvements. 

The acquisition of this property was necessary for the achievement 
of Southern's twenty-five year expansion program. Considerable progress 
has been made during the current biennium in acquiring the land 
necessary for this expansion. Since June 30, 1945, the holdings of 
the university have been increased from approximately 18 v l to 459 
acres. 












— - 



_ 






5-14-47 

Carbondale, 111.,' May -When Governor Dwight H. Green signed 
Senate Bill 93 last week, he made it possible for Southern Illinois 
Normal University to build dormitories for its students, President 
Chester F. Lay pointed out today. 

This bill "authorizes the State Teachers College Board to build 
or purchase residence halls and other buildings and authorizes the 
issuance of bonds payable from revenues derived from the operation of 
such buildings''' . 

Southern has only one dormitory, which was built in 1913 to 
house 72 women students and which is currently housing 120. 

Some educational authorities estimate that at least one-third 
to one-half of an institution's student body should be housed in 
dormitories, including all freshmen, both men and women. 

For Southern, this would mean dormitory facilities for 
approximately 800 to 1,200 students. 

The bill passed by the General Assembly which the Governor has 
signed into law was introduced at the request of the Teachers College 
Board in order to provide legal authorization for dormitory and other 
self-liquidating projects at Southern and the other schools in the 
State teachers college system. Actual negotiation with finance 
houses will be subject to action by the Board. 






Special to Dailies 



5-14-47 






Carbondale, 111., May — hr. Clarence C. Logan, formerly 

Normal 
assistant professor in the Southern Illinois/University High School, 

died in Bainbridge, Ohio, May 13, University officials have announced* 

Mr. Logan retired from active service on the Southern faculty 
August 3j 1946, He was a member of the University Film Service 
Committee and of the Jackson County Teachers Credit Union. 

His bachelor of science degree was obtained from the University 
of Illinois, where he also did graduate work* 

Mr. Logan came to Southern in 1923 as Supervisor of Science 
and Visual Aids, having been employed for the previous 12 years as 
assistant in soil survey work at the University of Illinois, From 
1916 until 191.3 he did soil extension work at the North Carolina 
College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, after which he returned to 
the University of Illinois as Farm Advisor, 

The funeral will be held May 17 at Louisville. 



if 



§ if 



) I- 






te. . 






5-14-47 

Carbondale,' 111., May -A total of 3S9 classes are being 
conducted at Southern Illinois Normal University during the current 
spring term, according to Dean Henry J. Rehn, in charge of classroom 
space scheduling. 

This number compares with 267 classes in the spring of 1946. 

The vast increase in class sections has been necessary because 
of the increase in student enrollment, Dean Rehn said, and points up 
the urgent need for increased classroom facilities. 

Classroom space at Southern has been at a premium for many years, 
even before the post-war enrollment boom created such a critical 
shortage, University officials say. 

No classroom building has been constructed on the Southern 
campus for nearly 20 years. Meanwhile enrollment has climbed from 
1,166 in the spring term of 1927-28 to 2,475 during the current term. 

There are 56 classes in English alone this term, with a total 
class enrollment of 2,047. Twenty-eight foreign language classes and 
2$ history classes are meeting, with total enrollments of 486 and 
683 respectively. 

A total of 779 students are enrolled in the 23 mathematics 
classes, 604 in the 23 women's physical education classes, 547 in the 
26 music classes. 









_ 






SOUTHERN ILLINOIS NORMAL UNIVERSITY INFORMATION SERVICE 
Lorena Drummond, Director 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., May 19-Southern Illinois Normal University- 
today was inspected by House and Senate Committees to Visit Educational 
Institutions. 

At a special student-faculty assembly, all solons present pledged 
support to the institution in dropping the word ''normal" from the 
name, and all expressed concern that adequate financial support be 
given to Southern to care for its vastly increased student body. 

Sen. Paul Broyles of Mt. Vernon, chairman, represented the Senate 
committee, since the other two members of the committee. Sen. Arthur 
E. Larson and Sen. William J. Connors, both of Chicago, were unable to 
be present. 

Members of the House committee in the inspection party were Rep. 
Ora Smith of Biggsville, chairman; Reps. William Robison of Carlinville, 
V7. B. 'Jestbrook of Harrisburg, and Lloyd C. Harris of Granite City. 
Rep. August C. Grebe of Peoria was not present. 

Legislators from adjoining Southern Illinois districts were also 
invited to be present, and Sen. R. G. Crisenberry of Murphysboro and 
Rep. Paul Powell of Vienna were on hand. 

Each speaker referred to Southern as ''Southern Illinois University, 
drawing prolonged applause from the crowd of some 1500-1600 students 
and faculty. Sen. Broyles, chairman of the Senate committee, said he 
would support this University "as long as I remain in the General 
Assembly." 

Rep. Robison expressed the hope that in addition to changing the 
name of Southern, "we can get enough funds for facilities here at 
Southern Illinois University to care for all the veterans who want to 
attend here." 

Rep. Smith, chairman of the House committee, pointed out that 
"This school has not been too well taken care of in the past" and 
pledged support for both the change of name and for adequate 
appropriations. 

"I know you don't care which political party is in power — all you 
are interested ^ n \$ whether we provide adequate support for education," 



Rep. Powell, a special guest for the occasion, declared. 

"I promisu you the Legislature will continue to provide adequate 
facilities to make it possible to improve the educational facilities 
for Southern Illinois.'' 

Rep. Harris declared, I?T ./e f re charged with providing facilities for 

the increased enrollment at this and the other state educational 

institutions." 

Sen. Grisenberry, not a member of the committee but like S^n. 

Porter an invited guest, expressed confidence that the change of name 

bills, of which he was the sponsor in the General Assembly, would pass. 

"This is the second step in making this institution serve Southern 
Illinois,'' he said, referring to the first move which resulted in 1943 
in legislation permitting Southern to establish liberal arts and 
vocational-professional colleges and a Graduate School. 

"Now if we can just get enough money for building needs, we'll be 
going into a bigger and better future," he said. 

"Let T s keep our minds open to new ideas, but keep hold of our old 
ideals," he cautioned. "We want this institution to overshadow its 
past history, but not to obliterate it." 

Gen. Robert XI, Davis of Carbondale, resident member of the 
Teachers College Board, was another invited guest. 

Referring to the vast financial demands being made on the General 
Assembly, Davis pointed to the urgent needs of Southern. 

"We T ve asked for more than we can get, we realize," he said, 
"We'll be satisfied if Southern gets her share — and possibly a little 
more. " 

University President Chester F, Lay, who introduced the visiting 
dignitaries, in his concluding remarks called attention to the critical 
need for educational facilities as a national security need. 

"It is obvious that there are two nations tugging for world 
power," ho said. "Russia has four times as many young people under 25 
as the United States has. There is nothing left for us but to be 
smart — and to nolish up smartness in our young people wherever we 
find it." 



L*. 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS NORMAL UNIVERSITY INFORMATION SERVICE 
Lorena Drummond, Director 

5-21-47 

Carbondale, 111., May -Dr. G. R. Sattgast, one-time youngest 
college president in the United States and an alumnus of Southern 
Illinois Normal University, will deliver the commencement address to 
the 1947 graduating class at Southern June 13, University President 
Chester F. Lay has announced. 

Dr. Sattgast, who graduated here in 1921, bridged the gap between 
undergraduate and college president in seven years. Former president 
of Sioux Falls College, South Dakota, he became president of Bemidji 
State Teachers College, Minnesota, in 193$ • 

He has had varied experience as a farmer, rural and later high 
school teacher, extension agent in dairy husbandry at the University 
of Illinois, superintendent of schools, college professor, and college 
president. He received the doctor of philosophy degree from Columbia 
in 1939. 

In the Army from 1943 to 1946, he served in American Military 
Government in France, Germany and Austria. There his primary 
responsibility was the collection and restoration of fine arts and 
other valuables looted by the Nazis. 

He was made a life fellow in the Warsaw Academy of Science for 
his work in returning the University of Warsaw library, and was also 
invited to V, T arsaw to receive the decoration Polenia Restituta in 
recognition of the restoration of the state archives of Poland and the 
Warsaw Museum. 

After his discharge from the army, the War Department recommended 
him for a position on General Mac Arthur* s staff as head of all teacher 
education for Japan. Because of his responsibilities at the Bemidji 
College, he could not accept the position. 

Dr. Sattgast' s major interest outside of education has always been 
in the field of international relations. He is a membei of the American 
Advisory Council of Yenching University, China, ard was secretary of 
the Midwestern University Council on Reconstruction after the war. 

He was delegate to the World Con :ress on Education for Democr* 
(1939) and is a sponsor of the National Lay Council on Education, 
served for six years as one of th^j 17 members of the board of govern ors 
of the National Society for Stability in Money and Banking, 

Dr. Satf-.ast is the author of the book ;f The Administration of 
College and University Endowments. " 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



5-21-47 
Carbondale, 111., May -It looks as if Southern Illinois Normal 

University has a monopoly on the chairmanship of the Illinois Junior 
Academy of Science, 

For the seventh consecutive year, a biological sciences graduate 
of Southern has been elected to this post, according to Dr. Walter B. 
Welch, chairman of the University botany department « 

Miss Kathryn Sturm of Decatur, a teacher, is the latest to hold 
this post, having been elected at the recent Academy meeting in Peoria 
She is the third Southern graduate to hold this position, Mrs. Audrey 
Lindsay of University High School, Carbondale, starting the succession 
in 1941, followed by Mrs, Mary Creager of Chester, Both Mrs. Lindsay 
and Mrs. Creager held the office for more than one term. 

Dr. Welch also was elected chairman of the botany section of the 
Illinois Academy of Science. 

.1 1. U .. ~li~ 



Carbondale, 111., May -Dr. W. Neal Phelps, associate professor t 
Southern Illinois Normal University, has been invited to deliver the 
commencement address to the Ava high school graduating class May 26. 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



5-21-47 

Garbondale, 111,, Hay -Employment opportunities, either for 
this summer or permanent, for veterans completing present school term 
this year and others who might be leaving school will be discussed 
by Emmet t T c Lawless, veterans employment representative of the 
Illinois State Employment Service here May 23. 

William R. Winkelmeyer, student advisement services officer for 
the Illinois Veterans' Commission assigned to Southern Illinois Normal 
University, announced the counseling service as part of a program to 
assist veterans between terms as well as during the school year. 

The counseling period will be held on May 2c, from 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m. at the Men's Lounge, at the University, 1010 Thompson Street. 
All veterans contemplating employment should accept the opportunity 
offered by the Illinois State Department of Labor of which the ISEo 
is a part, Winkelmeyer said. 



5-26-47 
Carbondale, 111., May -Dr. Chester F. Lay, president of 
Southern Illinois Normal University, has accepted an invitation to 
deliver the commencement address before the Brownstown Community High 
School graduating class Friday, May 30, at $ p.m. 

if fffr 



Carbondale, 111.,, May -Twelve Southern Illinois young men and 
women have won tuition scholarships at Southern Illinois Normal 
University for 1947-43 on the basis of try-outs held last week, Dr. 
Maurits Kesnar, chairman of the music department, has announced. 

The tryouts were for proficiency in work in one or the other of 
the musical organizations at Southern chorus, band and orchestra. 

Scholarships will go to the following: Russell Davis of 
Centralia, chorus; Lora Jean Etherton of Murphysboro, band and orchestra 
Jo Ann Ing of Herrin, chorus; Barbara Swart z of Carbondale, band and 
orchestra; William Hall of Carbondale, band and orchestra; Juanita 
Plantec of West Frankfort, orchestra; Pann Whiteside of West Frankfort, 
orchestra and chorus; Jack Gaal of West Frankfort, band and orchestra; 
Jo Donna Steele of West Frankfort, band and orchestra. 

Dr. Kesnar expressed gratification at the quality of performance 
shown by the students in the try-outs. 

vmfifif'tt.. ihi 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 5-26-47 

Carbondale, 111., May -Dr. Cass Arthur Reed, former president 
of the International College, Smyrna, Turkey, will deliver the 
taccalaureate sermon to 1947 graduates at Southern Illinois Normal 
University here June 9, University President Chester F. Lay has 
announced. 

Dr. Reed, a native of Michigan, holds the bachelor's degree from 
Pomona College, the bachelor of divinity degree magna cum laude from 
Union Theological Seminary, master of arts degrees from both Columbia 
and Harvard University, the doctor of education degree from Harvard. 
He also holds the doctor of divinity degree from Pomona. 

Forty years ago, on graduation from Pomona, he accepted a teaching 
position in Japan for two years. He was ordained in the ministry of 
the Congregational Church in 1911. 

From 1912 to 1936 he spent at the International College in Smyrna, 
first as professor of education, then as dean, and for ten years as 
president. During 1935-36 he was visiting professor of religion at 
the American University, Beirut, Syria. 

On his return to this country, he held the pastorate of the 
Pilgrim Congregational Church, Pomona, Calif., from 1936 to 1944. 

Dr. Reed, who following World War I served as director of the 
Smyrna unit of Near East Relief, in 1944 accepted as appointment with 
UNRRA, serving in 1945 and 1946 as finance officer of the Greek Mission. 

Since his return he has been lecturing on the Near bast and various 
aspects of the situation there, which is currently of keen public 
interest as a result of President Truman's proposal to furnish 
financial aid to Greece and Turkey. 

The baccalaureate service at Southern will be held Monday, June 9, 
at 9:30 a.m. Commencement exercises will be held Friday morning at 
10 o'clock, with Dr. Charles R. Sattgast, president of Bemidji (Minn.) 
State Teachers College, as speaker. 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 5-26-47 

Carbondale, 111., May -Appointment of 10 faculty members for 
the summer session and three for the 1947-4& long session was 
announced today by Dr. Chester F. Lay, president of Southern Illinois 
Normal University. 

Summer appointees include: 

Dr. C. W. Tebeau as associate professor of history. Now chairman 
of the department of history at Miami University, Florida, Dr. Tebeau 
holds the bachelor's degree from the University of Chattanooga and 
the master's and doctor's degrees from the University of Iowa. 

Dr. Raymond W. Esworthy as assistant professor in business. Dr. 
Esworthy, on the faculty of La Salle Junior College, holds the master's 
and doctor's degrees from the University of Illinois. 

R. P. Hibbs as instructor in speech. Mr. Hibbs is a member of 
the speech faculty and assistant principal of DuQuoin Township High 
School. He holds the master's degree from the University of Wisconsin 
and has done advanced work toward the doctor's degree. 

N. W. Draper as instructor in English. Mr. Draper teaches at 
Carbondale Community High School. He holds the master's degree from 
the University of Michigan. 

Mrs. Audrey Hill Lindsey as instructor in science in University 
High School. A graduate of Southern, she holds the master of science 
decree from the University of Michigan. Mrs. Lindsey for a number of 
years was science supervisor in University High School here at Southern., 
but has spent the last year teaching in Champaign, where her husband 
has been attending the University of Illinois. 

J. Stuart McNair, instructor in mathematics. Mr. McNair is 
currently teaching in a junior college in Balboa, Canal Zone. He 
holds the master's degree from the University of Chicago. 

Fred Lingle as instructor in English. Mr. Lingle teaches in 
Herrin Township High School. 

Maurice Clark as faculty assistant in government. Mr. Clark is 
also a teacher in Herrin Township High School, and was on the Southern 



staff in the spring of 19A-6. 

Arthur E. Hunter as faculty assistant in zoology.- A gr&duate of 
Southern, Mr. Hunter is teaching during the current spring term in 
the zoology department. 

Arthur Halfar as faculty assistant in the Registrar's Office. 
Mr. Halfar, whose home is St. Louis, Mo., has worked for some time in 
the Registrar's Office as a student. He will receive the bachelor's 
degree in June. 

Mr. McNair, Mr. Draper, and Dr. Esworthy and Mir. Lingle were 
all on Southern's faculty last summer. Mr. Draper has taught here a 
number of times previously. 

Long session appointees are: 

Dr. Charles L. Foote as associate professor of zoology. A 
graduate of North Texas State Teachers College, he holds the master of 
science degree from Texas A. & M. College and the doctor's degree 
from the University of Iowa. He is currently on the faculty of 
Wagner College, Grymes Hill, Staten Island, N. Y., after spending four 
years in the Navy. 

Dr. Wilkison W. Meeks as associate professor of physics. Dr. 
Meeks served as staff physicist at Haskins Laboratories, New York, and 
at Naval Ordnance, Washington, D.C. He is now on the faculty of 
Western Maryland College. A graduate of Marysville College, Tennessee, 
he holds the master's degree and doctor's degrees from Northwestern 
University. 

Miss Patricia Stahlheber as instructor in foreign languages. 
Miss Stahlheber, a teacher of French and Spanish at Monmouth High 
School, is a graduate of Southern and has the master's degree from the 
University of Illinois. 

President Lay also reported a number of resignations from the 
present faculty including: 

Dr. Robert C. Cas ell, professor and chairman of the agriculture 
department, to accept a position at Arkansas State College; Mrs. 
Dorthea Swan Brown, who has recently married, to join her husband in 
Chicago; Mrs. Mary Jane Grizzell, to join her husband in Murphysboro; 
Leonard Keefe, assistant professor of business, to accept a position 
at Gannon College, Penn.; Miss Helen barber, to be married and move 
to New York. 

Conrad White, assistant professor of agriculture, who was appointed 
for a one-year period, will leave Southern at the end of the summer 
term to accept a position at michigan State College. 






fc.- 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



5-29-47 

Carbondale, 111., May - John P. Carmichael, sports editor 
of the Chi dago Daily News , who will be the £,uest speaker at the 
annual banquet for lettermen of Southern Illinois Normal University 
athletic teams iammm Monday night, will arrive here at noon Monday, 
At>hletie "Director Glenn "Abe" Martin has announced. 

The banquet will be sponsored by the Carbondale Businessmen's 
Association, and will be held at 6:30 p. m. at the University 
Cafeteria. 

Carmichael has been cited by Connie Mack as his "favorite sports 
writer," and hailed by James T. Farrell, noted novelist, as "the 
best baseball writer in America today." 

I Two awards, the Henry Hinkley Memorial Trophy, and the Jack 
Dempsey Sports Trophy, will be presented at the banquet. 
The Hinkley trophy is awarded by Nu Epsilon Alpha social 
fraternity in memory of Henry Hinkley, .late student and fraternity 
member, who lost his life on Biak Island in the South Pacific while 
a member of the armed forces. 

The Dempsey trophy, which is furnished by the Adam Hat Co., will 
be presented for the first time at Southern. 

Carmichael will be the guest of Athletic Director Martin while 
he is here. 

### 









Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



5-29-47 

Carbondale, 111., May - Robert McDowell of i^ast St. Louis 

■ 

has been elected president of Mu Tau Pi, journalism fraternity at 
Southern Illinois Normal University, for 1947-4$« 

Other officers elected for next year are June Fulkerson of 
Carbondale, vice president, and Fred Senters of Flora, secretary- 
treasurer. 

Ten new members were initiated into the fraternity at the 
organization's spring picnic: Senters, Mary Alice Newsorne of Marion, 
Mary Leathers of Oblong, Fenton Harris of Tamaroa, Jean Larson of 
Carbondale, Dick Woods of Marion, Rodney Kraatz of Ullin, Marilyn 
Provart of DuQuoin, Dorothy Coleman of Carbondale, and Bill Plater 
of Vienna. 



Carbondale, 111., May -Dr. Kenneth A. Van Lente, professor 
of chemistry at Southern Illinois Normal University, and George Pope 
of Herrin, a former chemistry student, are the authors of an article 
which has appeared in the latest issue of Transactions . of the 
Illinois Academy of Science . 

The paper, presented at the Academy's meeting last year, is 
entitled "P-Dimethylaminoazo benzene-p-sulfonamide," and treats 
of the chemical compostion of a sulfa derivative. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Director 

5-29-47 

southern illinois normal university 
radio calendar 

Week ending June 5 , 1947 
Friday, kay 30 
No program — Memorial Jay Holiday 

Monday, June 2 
WCIL, 2:15-2:30 p. m. - "Music Is Yours,' 1 ' featuring David Mcintosh, 

Carbondale, bass soloist; Georgia Gher, 
Carbondale, piano soloist. Student announcer, 
Charlotte Waggener, Herrin. 
Tuesday, June 3 
WCIL, 2:15-2:30 p.m. - "Student Newscast," by journalism students 

Fenton Harris, Tamaroa; John Mulkin, Herrin; 
Bill Price, Texico. Student announcer, Bob 
Dunhouse, Sparta. 

Wednesday, June 4 
WCIL- 2:15-2:30 p.m. - "Campus Chatter," featuring the University 

Orchestra, v/ith Jim Lands, Harrisburg; 
Betty McHenry, Vienna; Dr. Maurits Kesnar, 
chairman of the music department, participating. 
Bill Price, Texico, interviewer. Student 
announcer, Doris Schwinn, DuQuoin. 
Thursday, June 5 
WCIL, 2*15-2:30 p. m. - "Little Theatre," presenting * ; Hop Frog," 

starring Neva Isbell, West Frankfort; Charles 
Weber, Cairo; Dale Kittle, Wayne City; 
Ralph Lane, Eldorado; W. K. Sisk, Carbondale. 
Student announcer, Barbara Schwartz, 
Carbondale. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond , Editor 

5-29-47 

Carbondale, 111., May - "Learning is the only means we have 
for pushing civilization forward — halting and occasionally receding 
as that movement may be," honor students at Southern Illinois Normal 
University were told today by Prof. E. G. Lentz, principal speaker 
for the traditional Honors Day special assembly. 

Prof. Lentz, curator of the Clint Clay Tilton Library, professor 
of history, and former dean of men, termed Honors Day "the most 
important day in the University calendar," since it pays tribute not 
only to students who have distinguished themselves academically but 
also to scholarship itself, which is the primary function of higher 
education. • . 

Awards announced at the assembly included: 

American Association of Teachers pf Spanish awards-presented by 
Dr. J. Cary Davis to Emma Welch of Carbondale, a senior. 

• Independent Student Union Scholarship plaque — presented by 
Gerald Webb of Harrisburg to Kai-Shek Hall, accepted by Betty Boucher 
of Murphysboro. 

Delta Sigma Epsilon Betty Rhodes scholarship—presented by 
Miss Hilda Stein to Margurine Pavloff of Zeigler, a sophomore non- 
sorority girl. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma Janice Neckers memorial scholarship — presented 
by Veda Hallam of Fairfield to Esther Pajak of Carbondale, a freshman 
non-sorority girl. 

Phi Beta Kappa prize for the graduating senior with the highest 
scholastic average — presented by Dean T. W. Abbott to Delb^rt Ray 
Fulkerson of Carbondale. 

President Chester F. Lay announced other awards which have been 
granted during the year, notably the '200 PTA scholarship to Ruth 
Sprankel of Waterloo and the American Association of University 
Professors Charles Neely scholarship to June Fulkerson of Carbondale, 
and aalled attention to the honor roll students listed in the Honors 
Day program. 

Processional music was played by the Maroon band, a piano solo 

was rendered by Florence Crim of Carbondale and a vocal solo by 
Ivan Swan of Marion. A reception was held after the assembly in 
honor of parents of the honor students. 

(mdre) 



-2- 

Students making the 1947 honor roll, who were accorded recogni- 
tion at Honors Day ceremonies, included: 

Freshmen : Paul P. Althoff of Valmeyer, Melva R. Borgmann of 

Okawville, Weldon D. Dillow of Dongola, Mary E. Fearnside of Mt. 

John 
Carmel, Vivian M. Ferrell off Eldorado, tfotou Howard Frazier of Oblong, 

Ruth G. Gaerig of DuQuoin, Evan L. Hill of Marion, William M. Irvin of 

Belle River, Mildred M. Lorenz of Waterloo, Donald Clarence May of 

Herrin. 

Richard L. Newby of Ridgefarm, Marie Nickoloff of West Frankfort, 
Esther Pajak of Harvey, Walter D. Reeder of Eldorado, George W. Rich 
of Cobden, Dorothy L. Rippelmeyer of Waterloo, Doris Jane Schwinn of 
Du Quoin, Martha Fay Sisk of Du Quoin, Leroy Virgil Stoldt of Shum- 
way, Edith Louise Todd of Mt, Vernon, Roy K. Weshinskey of Marissa, 
i Ann Rehm White of Equality, and Kenneth Kirk Marshall of Marion. 

Sophomores : Charles Barnard Ablett of Metropolis, Charles W. 
Allen of Carbondale, Joseph H. Barnett of Equality, Frank Bataitis 
of West Frankfort, Frank J. Bietto of Benld, Charles W. Blessin of 
Mt. Vernon, Francis L. Borella of Orient, Kenneth D. Campbell of 
Sparta, Richard Fay Capin of Mt. Carmel, Wallace R. Deason of Hurst. 

Lucille M. Dintleman of Nashville, Robert L. East of Carbondale, 
Patricia Rae Fields of West Frankfort, Wilbur Garber of West Frank- 
fort, Frank F. Groves of Carterville, Joanne Hampton of Carbondale, 
Millicent Louise Hankla of Carbondale, Betty Lou Hill of Benton, 
Louis Rendleman Karraker of Jonesboro, Dorothy Hood Kish of Harris- 
burg, Charles William Koch of Oakdale, Dorothy Alice Kraatz of Olmsted, 

Lee Ardell Kroener of Oakdale, Jetta Ruth Lively of Brighton, 
Donald Jackson Manus of Anna, Margurine Pavloff of Zeigler, Donald 
Pretzsch of Crossville, William Prusacyzk of West Frankfort, Fred- 
erick L. Pundsack of Pinckneyville, Bernadine Rebbe of Chester, 
Joseph Rezetka of West Frankfort, Patrick Vinton Riley of Zeigler, 

Doris Mae Sims of Murphysboro, Ralph w « Somers of Benton, Ruth 
Elizabeth Sprankel of Waterloo, William Raymond Staudacher of Marion, 
Bobbie Dean Stone of Marion, Lawrence E. Stone of Marion, Walter 
E, Stone of West Frankfort, William Frederick Ulrich of Pinckneyville, 

Rita Jean Weygandt of Belleville, and Jerrol Evans Williams of Salem. 

Nina Crawford Aikman of Rt. 1, Litchfield, 
Juniors and First Term Seniors : /John gass of Jonesboro, F. 

Laura ,Bell Baker of Raleigh, 

Edward Bennett of Pulaski, Peggy Lou Browning of De Soto, Mo., Marlin 

Mildred Frederick Davis of Dowell, 
Glenn Bunfill of Carbondale, Melba Carr of Carbondale, /Jane DeLap of 

Broughton, Robert Etheridge of Fairfield, Joan Fairbairn of Harvey, 

Helen "Francis of Nashville, 

Juanita June Fulkerson of Carbondale, Nancy S. Gillespie of Carbon- 



dale, Elmer Gilley of Harrisburg, Charles Thomas Goss of Marion, 
Lawrence E. Green of Carbondale. 

Marian Frances Gruber of Dowell, Raymond D. Hahn of Du Quoin, 

Clifford Clark Hatcher of Carbondale, Betty Louise Hawkins of Walnut 

Hill, Loretta Keough of Murphy sboro, Alex Kish of Harrisburg, Robert 

W. Lickiss of Murphysboro, Harry Newton McMurray of Du Quoin, Frank 

Berry Moake of Johnston City, Gus Edwin Paris of Rosiclare, Mabel 

Paterson of Carbondale, Lloyd L. Patheal of Carbondale, Judson V. 

Phillips of Shawneetown, Karl g. Plumlee of Du Quoin, Ralph Burgess 

Poynter of Mound City, Horton fi. Presley of Le Roy. CV 

George Albert Russell of Alto Pass, Barbara Schwartz of Carbon- 
dale, Billy Rex Shanahan of Marion, Ind., Velma Ruth Smith of Marion, 
111,, Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyville, Catherine tSullmlfan of Harrisburg, 
Norma Trotter of Cisne, Alice Lucille Vravick of West Frankfort, and 
Qlem George Wiedmari of Effingham. 

Graduating Seniors : ', Levi H. Boler- 

jack of Carbondale, Peggy Dean Boucher of Murphysboro, Jason J. 
Collins of Marion, Arthur K. Doerr, 

of Johnston City, Betty Duncan of Herrin, Angelina Marie Ferrari 
of Royalton, . '■'.-- .* ' *.•' '• •." AviskFrank of Carbondale. 

Ray Fulkerson of Carbondale, Amelia Gooch of Marion, J .•.;..*•;: c. 1 *" 
:•'• • -. uf .- .•!.•■.;• ■..*... Arthur Halfar of Carbondale, David G. Karraker 
of Jonesboro, Herman L. Kirkpatrick of Carbondale, Betty Jo Lemons of 
Tunnel Hill, Ruth Marie Litton of Centralia, Laline L. Lord of Jones- 
boro, Walter Mifflin of Carbondale, Agnes Bernice Newton of Marion. 

Millie L. Ogden of Carbondale, Mary Ellen Pangonis of West 
Frankfort, Ruth Utley Pigg of Omaha, Dolores Jones Pleasant of 
Belleville, Bonita Mae Russell of Carbondale, Robert Dewey Sauer- 
brunn of Jonesboro, Leland L. Scott of Harrisburg, Virginia Mae 
Sikkel of Carbondale, Charlene Mildred Sprankel of Waterloo, Gene- 
vvieve A. Wooldridge of De Soto, and Emma Marsh Welch of Carbondale. 






. 



Southern Illinois iTormal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Sditor 



5-29-47 

Carbondale, Ill.i May <- Arrangements have "been worked out with the 
Illinois Central Hailway to run special trains to St. Louis and Chicago for 
Southern Illinois ITormal University students and faculty when needed, University 
President Chester F. Lay has .announced. 

Wayne A. Johnston of Chicago, president of the railway, John D. Cameron, 
assistant traffic manager, St. Louis, and J. F. Sharkey, superintendent, Carb on- 
dale, called on President Lay this week to work out details of the plan. 

By means of this special service, University students and faculty may make 
trips to St. Louis or Chicago to attend meetings, visit business or industrial 
plants, attend plays or concerts or operas, at much more convenient hours than. 
are afforded by the railroad's regular schedule. The special trains will be 
provided onl;/ when a sufficiently large number of students or faculty are making 
the trip to justify the extra service. 

Carbondale, 111., May - Three new faculty representatives were elected 
to the President's advisor;'- council at Southern Illinois formal University at a 
recent faculty meeting. 

Miss Prances Barbour, associate professor of English, was elected Secretary 
of the faculty and an ex officio member of the advisor;,' - council for a term of 
one year, replacing Mrs. Julia Ueely, associate professor of English. 

Dr. Dorothy Davies, -orofessor of physical education for women was elected 
member-at-large for a three year term, replacing Dr. John Mayor, professor of 
mathematics. 

Dr. V/iiiiam 3. Schneider, professor of English, was elected for s three 
year term from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, replacing Dr. Willis G-. 
Swart z, professor of government. 

II Jill '< L 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

6-2-47 

Carbondale, 111., June - Opening of the 1947 summer session 
at Southern Illinois Normal University is scheduled for Juno 16. 

Approximately 120 courses are listed in the three undergraduate 
colleges and the Graduate School for the ei^ht-weeks* summer term. 
A number of workshops, both on and off campus, will be conducted to 
supplement the summer program, and short courses, seminars and other 
special offerings will be made available during the month of August, 
particularly for veterans. 

Two Rural Education Workshops, one on-campus, the other to be 
held at Salem, are calendared. A Public Health Education Workshop, 
held last summer, will be repeated, and a new Workshop on Child 
Growth and Development will be held for the first time. 

The Eleventh Annual Summer Conference of the Parent-Teacher 
Association and the annual Educational Exhibit of textbooks and 
other instructional materials will be held during the summer session. 

' ! It 

WWW 

Carbondale, 111., June - An 1^93 graduate of Southern Illinois 
Normal University was a recent visitor to the campus. 

C. Lee Downey, who was enrolled fmm''l$91 to 1S93, paid his first 

visit to his alma mater in more than 50 years. Accompanied by his 

daughter, Mrs. Lucille Jackson, he visited President Chester F. Lay, 

Dr. Orville Alexander, director of alumni services, and Mrs. Daniel 

B. Parkinson of Carbondale, widow of the University's fourth 

president. 

Dr. Parkinson and his wife, then hiss Raymond, were both on the 
faculty when-' he was in school, Downey said, while Dr. Robert Allyn 
was then president. 

Downey, whose home now is Little Orchard, Hannibal, Mo., has 
lived in Cincinnati almost ever since his graduation from Southern. 
He has been engaged in manufacturing. 

/ ! U 

h a rr 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service cMgoNpy n^ 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^t^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m 



6-2-47 

Carbondale, 111., June - You don't have to major in home 
economics at Southern Illinois Normal University to get the 
experience of living for the summer in the "practice house." 

The home management house, a laboratory lor students majoring 
in home management, affords these students the opportunity to plan 
meals, buy food, cook, wash household linen, clean house, wash and 
stretch curtains, use the various modern electrical appliances, and 
keep household accounts. 

In order to give non-home economics majors an opportunity to live 
in the house, it will be kept open during the summer, Miss Gladys 
Babcock, supervisor, has announced. 

Any girl of junior or senior standing is eligible to take the 
home management laboratory course, she said. Sophomores m£ y enroll 
only with permission of the dean of their college. 

Application should be made to miss Babcock or to Miss Lucy K. 
Woody, chairman of the home economics department before registration 
day , June 16 . 

The course carries four quarter hours credit. 

"Since many girls do not have time to do much work, in home 
economics before they graduate or marry," Miss Babcock said, "this 
is an excellent opportunity to gain some valuable experience in all 
phases of homernaking." 

### 



* Lal'UUHllcilU, ill. ,' UUlie ■■ ll yupptU J11UIIU 1U1 "uujluilh, juuuurri 
and the general public will be staged at Southern Illinois Normal 
University June 30, operating almost continuously all day and into 
the evening, the entertainment committee has announced. 

The Proctor Puppets will be brought to the campus for the day. 
A showing will be given for the Allyn Training School pupils and 
education classes at 10 a. m. , an evening show at 8 p. m. for the 
public, and a workshop will be operated all day IBor the benefit of 
iut crested, persons . 



I 






Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



6-2-47 

Carbondale, 111., June - George C. Atteberry of Chicago will 
be the principal speaker at the annual Alumni Banquet for graduates 
and former students of Southern Illinois Normal University here June 
12, Dr. Orville Alexnader, director of alumni services, has announced 

Atteberry, a member of the class of 1912, is now principal of 
the Shoop Elementary School in Chicago. Ke formerly taught at 
Wright Junior College, where he collaborated in the writing of a 
textbook, Introduction to Social Science . 

The banquet, traditionally held the evening before the 
University's commencement exercises, will be held at 6:30 p. m. in 
the gymnasium in the Science Building. 

Class reunions will be held in the afternoon for classes of 
1937, 1927, 1922, 1917, 1912, 1907, and 1397, Alexander said. 

Dr« Percival Bailey of Chicago, president of the Alumni 
Association, has designated the following committee to handle 
arrangements for the banquet: Dr. Clyde Brooks, chairman, Mrs. J. W. 
Barrow, and Dr. Alexander, all of Carbondale. 

Reservations for the banquet will be accepted until June 10, 
Dr. Alexander said. 

m 



Uai ' UUlILlalU , ill., JUiitf ^^^^p ^JuppLU jiiuuu iui liu-luiui, jiuuuiuj 



and the general public will be staged at Southern Illinois Normal 
University June 30, operating almost continuously all day and into 
the evening, the entertainment committee has announced. 

The Proctor Puppets will be brought to the campus for the day 
A showing will be given for the Allyn Training School pupils and 
education classes at 10 a. m. , an evening show at 8 p. m. for the 
public, and a workshop will be operated all day £or the benefit of 
..ittt Crested persons . //# 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - ILLINOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^■^^^^^^^^^^^MH^^^^M 



6-4-47 

Carbondale, 111., June -Nearly 350 1947 degree candidates will 
enter the last round of collegiate activities at Southern Illinois 
Normal University next week in preparation for the institution's 73^d 
annual commencement exercises. 

Two hundred and sixteen of these are scheduled to receive degrees 
at the graduation exorcises Friday, June 13, at 9:30 a. m. The 
remaining 130 will participate in commencement activities but will not 
complete their degrees until the end of the summer session. 

June degree candidates include 136 for the bachelor of science in 
the College of Education, 47 for bachelor's degrees in the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, 14 for the bachelor of science in the College 
of Vocations and Professions, and 14 for the master of science in 
education. Five other master's degree candidates who completed their 
work earlier in the year will also receive degrees June 13 . 

Senior Week will be observed at Southern throughout next week, 
starting with the baccalaureate service Monday morning at 10:30 a. m.-, 
at which the Rev. Cass Arthur Reed of Pomona, Calif., will be the 
baccalaureate speaker, and climaxing at commencement exercises Friday 
with Dr. Charles R. Satt^ast,. president of Bemidji (Minn.) State 
Teachers College and an alumnus of Southern, as the guest speaker. 



LUl'UUllllciiu , TttT7T m ^JTTn^^^^^^i^xrppei^vrrmr m PVL liixxuilu, juuucuuu 
and the general public v/ill be staged at Southern Illinois Normal 
University June 30, operating almost continuously all day and into 
the evening, the entertainment committee has announced. 

The Proctor Puppets will be brought to the campus for the day. 
A showing will be given for the Allyn Training School pupils and 
education classes at 10 a. m. , an evening show at 8 p. m. for the 
public, and a workshop will be operated all day Jfior the benefit of 
rested persons. 



Seniors will be honored at a round of social events throughout 
the week, including faculty-senior softball games, picnics, 
complimentary movies, swimming parties, breakfasts, teas, and other 
activities. 

On Monday night the seniors will be honorees at a reception given 
by President and Mrs. Chester F. Lay, and on Wednesday night a senior 
banquet will be held. The senior class will present a radio program 
recounting the achievements of the class on Wednesday afternoon at 
2:15 over Station WCIL, Carbondale. 

Seniors are also invited to attend the annual Alumni Banquet 
on Thursday evening. 

A reception for parents of the graduating seniors will be held 
by the University president in his office immediately following the 
commencement service on Friday. 

This year's graduating class v/ill bring the number of degrees 
conferred by Southern to a total of 3>53l. In addition, during the 
early year's of the institution's history, a total of 4,565 two-year 
diplomas were granted, making a grand total of $,14b graduates. 



> 



and the general public v/ill be staged at Southern Illinois Normal 
University June 30, operating almost continuously all day and into 
the evening, the entertainment committee has announced. 

The Proctor Puppets will be brought to the campus for the day. 
A showing will be given for the Allyn Training School pupils and 
education classes at 10 a. m. , an evening show at 8 p. m. for the 
public, and a workshop will be operated all day ifior the benefit of 
interested persons . 



: 



, 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



6-10-47 

Carbondale, 111., June -President Chester F. Ley of Southern 
Illinois Normal University today publicly expressed his opposition 
to Senate Bill 223 recently reported out by the senate education 
committee. . This bill seeks to deny state financial aid to any 
Illinois high school holding membership in an accrediting association 
not operating exclusively within Illinois. 

Dr. Lay., in commenting on Senate Bill 223, said it would not 
affect the University High School here, since it receives neither flat 
grants nor equalization aids from the state now. 

"The best high schools in the state and Southern Illinois would 
all be adversely affected, however," according to President Lay. 
"Bpth high schools and colleges and universities have been helped 
immeasurably in the past quarter-century to improve their standards of 
work by voluntarily submitting to inspections by regional accrediting 
associations, of which the North Central Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools is one of the strongest in the nation. Senate Bill 
223 > if made into lav;, would discriminate against the very high 
schools which should be pointed to with most pride," 



uaroonaaie, ill., June - A pu ppet billow xor uiinui ' uu, bmuu mry 
and the general public will be staged at Southern Illinois Normal 
University June 30, operating almost continuously all day and into 
the evening, the entertainment committee has announced. 

The Proctor Puppets will be brought to the campus for the day. 
A showing v/ill be given for the Allyn Training School pupils and 
education classes at 10 a. m. , an evening show at 8 p. m. for the 
public, and a workshop will be operated all day lfior the benefit of 
i i x'erested persons . 



1 



. 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



6-10-47 

Carbondale, 111,, June -President Chester F. Lay of Southern 
Illinois Normal University today publicly expressed his opposition 
to Senate Bill 223 recently reported out by the senate education 
committee.. This bill seeks to deny state financial aid to any 
Illinois high school holding membership in an accrediting association 
not operating exclusively within Illinois. 

Dr, Lay., in commenting on Senate Bill 223, said it would not 
affect the University High School here, since it receives neither flat 
grants nor equalization aids from the state now. 

"The best high schools in the state and Southern Illinois would 
all be adversely affected, however,' 5 according to President Lay. 
"Both high schools and colleges and Lmiversities have been helped 
immeasurably in the past quarter-century to improve their standards of 
work by voluntarily submitting to inspections by regional accrediting 
associations, of which the North Central Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools is one of the strongest in the nation. Senate Bill 
223, if made into law, would discriminate against the very high 
schools which should be pointed to with most pride." 



uaroondaie, ill., June - A pu ppet, snow xur cmiurun, bLuuems 
and the general public will be staged at Southern Illinois Normal 
University June 30, operating almost continuously all day and into 
the evening, the entertainment committee has announced. 

The Proctor Puppets will be brought to the campus for the day. 
A showing will be given for the Allyn Training School pupils and 
education classes at 10 a. m. , an evening show at 8 p. m. for the 
u public, and a workshop will be operated all day fior the benefit of 
.: ii/^rested persons. 



, 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



6-10-47 

Carbondale, 111., June -President Chester F. Lay of Southern 
Illinois Normal University today publicly expressed his opposition 
to Senate Bill 223 recently reported out by the senate education 
committee.- This bill seeks to deny state financial aid to any 
Illinois high school holding membership in an accrediting association 
not operating exclusively within Illinois. 

Dr. Lay, in commenting on Senate Bill 223, said it would not 
affect the University High School here, since it receives neither flat 
grants nor equalization aids from the statu now. 

"The best high schools in the state and Southern Illinois would 
all be adversely affected, however," according to President Lay. 
"Both high schools and colleges and universities have been helped 
immeasurably in the past quarter-century to improve their standards of 
work by voluntarily submitting to inspections by regional accrediting 
associations, of which the North Central Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools is one of the strongest in the nation. Senate Bill 
223, if made into lav/, would discriminate against the very high 
schools which should be pointed to with most pride." 



uaroonaaie, ni., June 



- A puppet snow ±ur uniiureii, — sLuuenua 

I and the general public will be staged at Southern Illinois Normal 
University June 30, operating almost continuously all day and into 
the evening, the entertainment committee has announced. 

The Proctor Puppets will be brought to the campus for the day. 
A showing will be given for the Allyn Training School pupils and 
education classes at 10 a. m. , an evening show at 8 p. m. for the 
k public, and a workshop will be operated all day JBor the benefit of 
interested persons. 



1 



, 



I 

J m Southern Illinois 

U— — — — Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE ' Illinois 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



II 



6-10-47 

Carbondale, 111., June -Dr. Charles D. Tenney, administrative 
assistant to the president and professor of English and philosophy, 
will serve as Director of the Summer Session opening June 16 at 
Southern Illinois Normal University, University President Chester F* 
Lay has announced. 

This will be the first time in history that Southern has had a 
director of the summer session, President Lay said, although the 
practice is common among leading educational institutions. 

The summer session will extend from June 16 to August 3, with 
additional short courses being available during the month of August. 



••a ■ • ji -i 



uaroonaaie, ill., Jung A puppet mmw iuT (juiiureu, buuubiiib 

and the general public will be staged at Southern Illinois Normal 
University June 30, operating almost continuously all day and into 
the evening, the entertainment committee has announced. 

The Proctor Puppets will be brought to the campus for the day. 
A showing will be given for the Allyn Training School pupils and 
education classes at 10 a. m. , an evening show at 8 p. m. for the 
public, and a workshop will be operated all day lfior the benefit of 
interested persons . 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



6-10-47 

Carbondale, 111., June -John Jacob Niles, folk-singer, will 
be brought to Southern Illinois Normal University June 19 for the 
second time in two years for a recital of Anglo-American madrigals, 
ballads, sailor chanties, street songs, work songs and nursery rhymes. 

Mr. Niles was guest artist for a Southern-sponsored music festival 
at Giant City two years ago. 

This year he will be presented in an evening recital, according 
to Dr. Maurits Kesnar, professor and chairman of the music department. 

Mr. Niles has been widely acclaimed as a folklorist and artist. 
He accompanies himself on a dulcimer, lute-like instrument which he 
has made himself. 

His music has been collected in the remote corners of Kentucky, 
Virginia, West Virginia, North and South Carolina and Tennessee, where 
century-old music from England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland still 
lives in ballad form. 

irifini.. :. i/'ifi. ii 



uaroonaaie, ill., June 



- a puppet, snow ±or cniiurtm, — siuubins 
and the general public will be staged at Southern Illinois Normal 
University June 30, operating almost continuously all day and into 
the evening, the entertainment committee has announced. 

The Proctor Puppets will be brought to the campus for the day. 
A showing will be given for the Allyn Training School pupils and 
education classes at 10 a. m. , an evening show at 8 p. m. for the 
public, and a workshop will be operated all day fior the benefit of 
interested . persons . 




1 



, 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



6-10-47 

Carbondale, 111,, June -President Chester F. Lay of Southern 
Illinois Normal University today publicly expressed his opposition 
to Senate Bill 223 recently reported out by the senate education 
committee.- This bill seeks to deny state financial aid to any 
Illinois high school holding membership in an accrediting association 
not operating exclusively within Illinois. 

Dr, Lay, in commenting on Senate Bill 223, said it would not 
affect the University High School here, since it receives neither flat 
grants nor equalization aids from the state now. 

"The best high schools in the state and Southern Illinois would 
all be adversely affected, however," according to President Lay. 
"Bpth high schools and colleges and universities have been helped 
immeasurably in the past quarter-century to improve their standards of 
work by voluntarily submitting to inspections by regional accrediting 
associations, of which the North Central Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools is one of the strongest in the nation. Senate Bill 
223, if made into law, would discriminate against the very high 
schools which should be pointed to with most pride." 



uaroonaaxe, in., June - A puppel snow ±or uniiuren, — siuubiitb 
and the general public will be staged at Southern Illinois Normal 
University June 30, operating almost continuously all day and into 
the evening, the entertainment committee has announced. 

The Proctor Puppets will be brought to the campus for the day. 
A showing will be given for the Allyn Training School pupils and 
education classes at 10 a. m. , an evening show at 8 p. m. for the 
public, and a workshop will be operated all day Ifior the benefit of 



./ , interested persons 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




6-16-47 

Carbondale, 111., June -Five additional new visiting faculty 
members for the summer term and a permanent addition to the staff 
of Southern Illinois Normal University have been announced by University 
President Chester F. Lay. 

Miss Doris Sewell of Murphysboro, graduate of the University of 
Illinois and last year an assistant counselor in girls dormitories at 
Stephens College, has been named faculty assistant, starting with the 
summer term. She will. serve as half-time assistant to the dean of 
women and half-time as assistant to the director of Anthony Hall, 
girls dormitory. 

The summer visitors include: 

Dr. Kenneth D. Luney as associate professor of economics. Dr. 
Luney, graduate of Geneva College, holder of master T s and doctor f s 
degrees from the University of Illinois, comes to Southern from a 
position as assistant director of personnel for the U. S. Employment 
in Panama, C.Z. 

Miss Mary Elizabeth Beck as instructor in music, to substitute 
for David S. Mcintosh, associate professor, on leave because of illness. 
Miss Beck, a graduate of Illinois Wesley an University and holder of 
the master of music degree from the University of Arizona, has taught 
in the Springfield College of Music and in the public schools of 
Illinois and Arizona. 



Carbondale, 111., June - a puppet snow lor cnxiaren, suuuenoo 
and the general public will be staged at Southern Illinois Normal 
University June 30, operating almost continuously all day and into 
the evening, the entertainment committee has announced. 

The Proctor Puppets will be brought to the campus for the day. 
A showing will be given for the Allyn Training School pupils and 
education classes at 10 a. m. , an evening show at 3 p. m. for the 
public, and a workshop will be operated all day £or the benefit of 
interested persons. 



Earl TrobauTh as instructor in University High School. Mr. 
Trobaugh has taught at the LaSalle-Peru High School and Junior College 
for the past nine years. A native of Carbondale, he is a graduate of 
Southern and holds the master of arts degree from the University of 
Illinois. 

Miss Claribel Fehrman as instructor in charge of Anthony Hall 
for the summer. A teacher of mathematics and dean of girls at United 
Township High School in East Iloline, Miss Fehrman holds the bachelor's 
degree from the University of Illinois and the master of arts degree 
in personnel work from Columbia University. 

Miss Lucy Parrish as half-time instructor in University High 
School. A graduate of Southern and a master of arts graduate of the 
University of Illinois, she has taught at Percy and for several years 
has been on the faculty of Carbondale Community High School. 

ffihn, if ft if 

Carbondale, 111., June -Four faculty members of Southern 
Illinois Normal University who have been on sabbatical leave of 
absence for the past long session have resumed their duties with the 
opening of the summer session. They are: 

Dr. Bruce Merwin, professor of education, who has be^n engaged in 
research at several west Coast universities; Robert D. Faner, associate 
professor of English, who has spent the year completing his doctoral 
degree at the University of Pennsylvania; J. Henry Schroeder, professor 
of industrial education, who has been carrying on doctoral study at the 
University of Missouri; and Miss Ruby Van Trump, assistant professor 
in Allyn Training School, who has been carrying on doctoral study at 
George Peabody College for Teachers. 









•\ 



Carbondale, 111., June - a puppet snow lor cruiuren, auuueaut. 
and the general public will be staged at Southern Illinois Normal 
University June 30, operating almost continuously all day and into 
the evening, the entertainment committee has announced. 

The Proctor Puppets will be brought to the campus for the day. 
A showing will be given for the Allyn Training School pupils and 
education classes at 10 a. m. , an evening show at 8 p. m. for the 
public, and a workshop will be operated all day IPor the benefit of 
arrested persons. 7$ 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE ' ILLINOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■^■^^■^^^^^■■■■■H^MBBMi 



6-13-47 

Carbondale, 111., June -A total of 1,£>49 students have 
enrolled at Southern Illinois Normal University for the summer session, 
an increase of 17.5 per cent over last summer. 

Last summer, final registration was 1,573« Students may continue 
to register through the remainder of this week. 

Of the summer student body, 916 are veterans, an increase of 
almost 35 percent above the 679 veterans enrolled last summer. 

The summer enrollment is approximately three-fourths as large as 
the spring term enrollment of 2,477 at Southern. Press reports 
indicate that summer enrollment at some other higher educational 
institutions has slumped sharply, the University of Illinois, for 
example, showing a drop from 1$,000 in the spring term to #,400 for 
the summer term. 

trffjffflfiniiF 

Carbondale, 111., June -Herman Mines of Sparta has been 
appointed assistant football coach and teacher of industrial arts in 
the Sparta Township High School, Glenn "Abe" Martin, director of 
athletics at Southern Illinois Normal University, has announced. 

Mines received the bachelor of science in education degree from 
the University at the June 13 commencement. 

A veteran, Mines has played tackle on the Maroon football team 
for three years. 



Carbondale , ill., June ~ - a puppeir^snuw iur errxiaren, siuutnus 
and the general public will be staged at Southern Illinois Normal 
University June 30, operating almost continuously all day and into 
the evening, the entertainment committee has announced. 

The Proctor Puppets will be brought to the campus for the day. 
A showing will be given for the Allyn Training School pupils and 
education classes at 10 a. m. , an evening show at 8 p. m. for the 

public, and a workshop will be operated all day IBor the benefit of 

I 

interested persons. :/# 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALB ' i«»om 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. taMmmmmmBmmmmmm ^ mmmmmmmmmmB m 



6-1S-47 

Carbondale, 111*, June -Tom Morelock, professor of journalism 
at the University of Missouri, will be presented by Southern Illinois 
Normal University as the guest speaker for the Southern Illinois 
Editorial Association annual dinner here Friday night, Lorena Drummond, 
director of the Southern Information Service, has announced. 

The editorial association will hold its annual two-day meeting 
on the University campus Friday and Saturday, with Julius Mueller, 
Ramsey News - Journal , president, in charge. 

Mr. Morelock has been on the faculty of the Missouri School of 
Journalism since 1924, has served as acting dean, and is director of 
the University Office of Public Information. He is also executive 
secretary of the Missouri Interscholastic Press Association. 

Former editor and publisher of the Green City (Mo. ) Pr ess , 
he also formerly was a reporter and copy reader on the Quincy (111.) 
Herald . 

He is the author of a textbook on high school and junior college 
journalism. 

A veteran of World War I, he served for two years during World 
War II with the Overseas Branch of the Office of War Information. 

Mr. Morelock' s subject at the banquet Friday night will be "Judging 
a Community b -r Its Newspaper*" 



Carbondale, 111., June - a puppet snow iur cuxiareii, suuueiibs 
and the general public will be staged at Southern Illinois Normal 
University June 30, operating almost continuously all day and into 
the evening, the entertainment committee has announced. 

The Proctor Puppets will be brought to the campus for the day. 
A showing will be given for the Allyn Training School pupils and 
education classes at 10 a. m. , an evening show at 8 p. m. for the 
u public, and a workshop will be operated all day £or the benefit of 
attested, persons . 



Registration for the two-day meeting will start Friday morning 
at 9^30 o'clock in the Little Theatre on the University campus. 

Speakers at the opening session will be Otha W. Lanier, Altamont 
News , on "Why Newspaper Work Appeals to Me"; Joe G. Vallow, Kinmundy 
Express , on "What Photographers Need for Small Newspapers"; A. James 
Brook of Western Newspaper Union, Chicago, on "Two-Color Printing in the 
Newspaper Field"; Charles L. Morris, Butler Paper Company, St. Louis, 
an informal discussion on paper. 

In the afternoon, Miriam Cress of the Hillsboro Journal as the 
opening sperker will discuss "Dealing with the Public in a Newspaper 
Office". Other afternoon speakers will be Vernon Ittner, Highland 
Journal , on "Why Devote More Time to Subscriptions?" Arthur D. Jenkins, 
Mascoutah Herald , on "What Lies Ahead of Us"; Robert A. Steffes, 
instructor in journalism, Southern, on "Why Journalism Is Essential"; 
and L. A. File, Chester Herald-Tribune , ■ on "What I Think of Classified 
Advertising." 

On Saturday morning, following a 10 o'clock coffee session in the 
Student Lounge, a musical interlude will be presented by the University 
music department . 

Speakers Saturday morning will be Charles C. Feirich, Metropolis 
News , on "What About Postal Printing?", and Curt Small, Harrisburg 
Register , on "What Makes a Newspaper Click?" 

While the association is comprised chiefly of weekly editors, 
Southern Illinois dailies, wire services and radio stations have be^n 
invited to send representatives to the meeting, and have particularly 
urged to attend the dinner Friday night, Miss Drummond Said. 

tfifinh, , 11 



"Caroondale , ill., June — -~~ a puppet snow lor canuren, buuuwul-o 
and the general public will be staged at Southern Illinois Normal 
University June 30, operating almost continuously all day and into 
the evening, the entertainment committee has announced. 

The Proctor Puppets will be brought to the campus for the day. 
A showing will be given for the Allyn Training School pupils and 
education classes at 10 a. m. , an evening show at 8 p. m. for the 
public, and a workshop will be operated all day JPor the benefit of 
interested persons. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drurnmond, Editor 



6-24-47 



Carbondale, 111., June - An exhibit of children's books 
representing all types of children's literature will be shown at 
Southern Illinois Normal University June 30 and July 1, J. Ward 
Dillow, chairman of the Annual Educational Materials Exhibit 
committee, has announced. 

Some 35 book companies are cooperating in the showing, which 
will be conducted by Mrs. Ruth Tooze, recognized authority on 
juvenile books and literature. 

Mrs. Tooze will also lecture to individual University classes 
in English and education. 

#§# 



Carbondale, 111., June - Miss Lorraine Waters of Percy, 
who will complete the master's degree at Southern Illinois Normal 
University this summer, has been appointed instructor at Southern 
effective with the opening of the fall term, University President 
Chester F. Lay has announced. 

Miss Waters has had some six years' experience in museum work, 
both at Southern as an undergraduate and graduate student assistant, 
and in the State Museum in Springfield. 






Carbondale, 111., June - A puppet show for children, students 
and the general public will be staged at Southern Illinois Normal 
University June 30, operating almost continuously all day and into 
the evening, the entertainment committee has announced. 

The Proctor Puppets will be brought to the campus for the day. 
A showing will be given for the Allyn Training School pupils and 
education classes at 10 a. m. , an evening show at 8 p. m. for the 
public, and a workshop will be operated all day Iftor the benefit of 
.interested persons. #§ 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS NORMAL UNIVERSITY INFORMATION SERVICE 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



6-24-47 

Carbondale, 111., June -The regular quarterly Child Guidance 
Clinic will be held at Southern Illinois Normal University Wednesday 
and Thursday, June 25-26, Dr. U. A. Thalman, clinic director, has 
announced. - 

Dr. Sophie Schroeder, psychiatrist, and Mrs. Eadith Morales, 
psychiatric social worker, of the Illinois Institute for Juvenile 
Research, will aid University clinic staff members in diagnosing the 
individual children brought from Southern Illinois communities and in 
conducting seminars for the benefit of University students. 

Also assisting in the studies will be Mrs. Alice Rector, University 
instructor; Robert Ashby of Carbondale, student; Ned Carlton, county 
superintendent of schools from Randolph County; and Raymond 
Richardson, Centralia grade school principal. 

More than 400 students and in-service teachers attended the 
spring clinic, Dr. Thalman said. During the past year more than 1,400 
students have attended the clinics. 

"These students have had the opportunity of becoming acquainted 
with several of the techniques, procedures, and types of testing 
which are being used in the understanding of the typical child or 
adolescent as well as the one who is not typical." 

ffh : fhhfff 



Carbondale, 111., June -An exhibit of oil, water color and 
gouasche paintings from the Jane Street Group of New York City is now 
hanging in the Little Gallery and in the Art Center at Southern Illinois 
Normal University, Ben Watkins, acting chairman of the art department, 
has announced. 

Kenneth Ervin, organiser and director of th« Jane Street Group, 
is visiting Mr. Watkins this week, and is holding personal conferences 
with students interested in design, painting end the graphic arts. 

thi tiiffi u iirf 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS NORMAL UNIVERSITY INFORMATION SERVICE 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



6-24-47 

Carbondale, 111., June -A six-months' Government fellowship 
for research in Peru has been awarded to Joseph R. Baxter, instructor 
in history at Southern Illinois Normal University, Dr. Harold E. 
Briggs, chairman of the history department, has announced. 

Mr. Baxter came to the University at the beginning of the winter 
term to teach courses in Latin-American history. He is nearing 
completion of the doctor's degree at Duke University in Latin-American 
studies. 

His research work in South America will be in line with his 
doctor's thesis, which he expects to complete by the time he returns 
to Southern next winter term. 

The fellowship he has received was granted to him by the U.S. 
Department of State. 

Carbondale, 111., June -Miss Esther Morgan, visiting instructor 
in physical education for women at Southern Illinois Normal University, 
will present a demonstration of rhythms and dancing and methods of 
teaching them Thursday morning at 11 o'clock in the gymnasium in the 
science building, Dr. Dorothy Davies, chairman of the women's physical 
education department, has announced. 

This demonstration is expected to be of interest to all 
elementary teachers and critics. 

Miss Morgan came to Southern for the summer from State Teachers 
College, Oneonta, N.Y. 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS NORMAL UNIVERSITY INFORMATION SERVICE 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

6-25-47 

Carbondale, 111., June -Membership in the American 
Association for Adult Education has been secured by Raymond H. Dey, 
director of the Extension and Placements Services at Southern Illinois 
Normal University, President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

The University is also planning to seek affiliation with the 
national University Extension Association. 

ffffTfifn frff 

Carbondale, 111., June -The reason Leon Kirkpatrick, 1927 
graduate of Southern Illinois Normal University, did not return to 
the campus for the Alumni Banquet this month was a good one--he was 
engaged in giving a series of piano recitals on the West Coast, he 
has written his former faculty members here. 

Kirkpatrick, a native of DuQuoin, made; his musical debut in 1943 
in Chicago, and won acclaim which resulted in a concert tour in the 
Middle West. 

The 6-f oot-four-inch Negro pianist has been called by some critics 
the foremost pianist of his race on the concert stage. 

Irlfii i if if it 

Carbondale, 111., June -Two Southern Illinois Normal 
University graduates received advanced degrees from Ohio State 
University this spring, according to reports received here. 

Max W. Hill of Carbondale, who obtained the bachelor of education 
degree here in 1941 and later worked as a research chemist on the 
atomic bomb at the Oak Ridge, Tenn., received the doctor of philosophy 
degree at Ohio State. 

Fred Applegath of Herrin, who graduated in 1942, has obtained the 
master of science degree from Ohio State. 



I 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS NORMAL UNIVERSITY INFORMATION SERVICE 



i 



Lorena Drummond, Editor 

6-25-47 

Carbondale, 111., June -Appointment of Jose Luis Reyes of 
Mexico City as holder of the first Rotary Club International scholarship 
at Southern Illinois Normal University has been announced by 
University President Chester F. Lay. 

Senor Reyes has also been granted a graduate assistantship in the 
language department at Southern for the summer session. He will 
teach conversational Spanish. 

The Rotary Club scholarship was established last year by the 
Southern Illinois district of Rotary, to be financed by annual 
contributions of each Rotary Club member in this area. 

Senor Reyes has been chosen as the recipient of the scholarship 
for the summer session, which carries a stipend of v 200. 

During the winter and spring terms, Senor Reyes has been an 
instructor and a graduate student at the University of Maryland, where 
he has been working on the master of education degree in educational 
guidance . 

He already holds two degrees—the bachelor of arts in arts and 
letters and in agriculture, and the bachelor of science in physics, 
mathematics and engineering, from the National University of Mexico. 
He has also taught in the National Engineering School in Mexico and in 
the Universidad Femenina de Mexico, and has practiced as a surveying 
engineer. 

He plans to return to Mexico to spend his life in helj ing develop 
"people of good will and cooperative attitudes "--in personal, inter- 
group, and international relations, he declares. 

mm 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



6-27-47 
Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., June 27 -Hopes of Southern Illinois Normal 
University for extensive building funds from the General Assembly have 
dwindled in last-week legislative shifts of appropriation bills to 
bring total appropriations within the Governor's budget* 

Southern had asked for reappropriation of unexpended balances 
from its 1945-47 building appropriations, plus ^7 > 500,000 for 
additional construction and land acquisition. 

Bills appropriating ^26,000,000 for new construction at the five 
state teachers colleges and normal universities— including the $7> 500,001 
for Southern--have been withdrawn by their sponsors following a 
conference of representatives of these schools with State Department of 
Registration and Education officials June 17. 

In addition, all Departments were asked to pare their requests 
for building funds by 15 per cent, in order to meet the ^10, 000, 000 
appropriation for increase of public school teachers' salaries. 

The State Department of Registration and Education complied with 
this request by asking the five teachers colleges and normal universities 
to effect a 15 per cent reduction in the total sought in reappropriation 
of funds allocated for building in 1945-47. 

For Southern, therefore, the appropriation bill currently pending 
provides a total of ^2, 565 ,017, according to University Business 



(2) 

Manager Edward V» Miles, Jr. 

This includes $23,571 for completion of the power plant (contracts 
have already been awarded out of the 1945-47 appropriation totaling 
$1>3#3>4#9 for power plant and steam tunnel construction), ^225,000 for 
acquisition of land already under option, $35,000 for construction 
of storm water drainage for the new training school, and $>2,2#1,446 
for construction of the training school units. 

Eliminated from the bill was $90,000 for furniture and furnishings 
for the training school units. 

When the 1945-47 appropriation was mode, $1,704,235 was allocated 
for construction of the training school. Rising costs have pushed 
this figure in the new bill to $.2,2^1,446. 

In other words, Southern v/ill receive funds sufficient to build 
the power plant and steam tunnels, construct the training school units, 
and complete purchase of land already under negotiation, in accordance 
with plans contemplated for the 1945-47 biennium, but will not be 
able to furnish the training school, nor to start construction of 
other buildings such as a library and classroom structures. 

With the $l,333f4#9 power plant already contracted for, and the 
additional $2,565,017 appropriation in the present bill, Southern 
will be able to spend $3, 943, 506 for buildings in the next two years. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^MBMI^^^^BBBMi^^^^ 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



6-27-47 

Carbondale, 111., June -About 40 Southern Illinois Normal 
University students, taking a course in State government, made a 
one-day trip to Springfield this week to see government -in- act ion. 

This group was escorted by Dr. Orville Alexander, professor of 
government, who formerly was director of research for the Illinois 
Legislative Council. The students visited the Legislature and state 
departments. 

Those who made the trip included: Tallis Argos of Murphysboro, 
Mrs. Maxine Harris Blackman of Ramsey, Edwin L. Bryant of Norris City, 
William Burns of 4$46 W. Lake Street, Chicago, Verne Carrell of Cisne, 
Stephen Clark of Rt . 2, Marion, Robert Dodson of Greenview. 

Jack Drake of V/est Frankfort, Janice Ferrill of Carbondale, 
Lawrence Gallick of West Frankfort, Howard W. Coin of McLeansboro, 
Russell Grantham of Murphysboro, Harry C, Gunn of Carbondale, Mabel 
Hake of Centralia, Gordon Henrichs of Gridley, James G. John of Mt. 
Carmel, Max A. Irwin of Broughton, Dorothy Kraatz of Olmsted. 

Robert J. McNeely of Carbondale, Kenneth V. Mason of Albion, 
William A. Morris of Equality, Myron O'Hara of Carbondale, George H. 
Otrich of Jonesboro, William N. Paris of Rosiclare, A. E. Phegley of 
Redbud, Roy D. Ragsdale of DeSoto, John L. Russell of West Frankfort. 

Doris M. Sims of Murphysboro, Leon Sitter of Cobden, Ina Skinner 



(2) 



of Albion, Lora June Smith of DeSota, Ora M. Snider of Steeleville, 

Howard Thurm: n of Salem, L. Allen Troutman of Zeigier, Mr. and Mrs, I 

V.N, Wheeles of Makanda, Lorene K, Wills of Simpson, Dorothy Witte of 

Willisville, Jack E, Barth of Rt . 4, Marion and Nina L. McLaughlin of 

Sparta, 






Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS. 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinpis 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



6-30-47 

Carbondale, 111., June 30 - And that's the end of Southern 
Illinois Normal University! 

When Governor Dwight H. Green signed into lav/ Senate Bills 13, 
14, 15 and 16 last Friday night, the word "normal" was eliminated from 
the name of this 73-year-old higher educational institution and it 
became officially "Southern Illinois University." 

News of the signing of the bill hit the campus this morning as 
students returned from their wee-end recess, and ran like wildfire 
through classes. 

The President's Office said it would require several weeks and 
possibly even months for every one to become accustomed to saying 
"University" instead of "Normal". 

For the present, however, the entire staff is being instructed to 
cross out the word "normal" on all stationery, printed materials and 
other places where it occurs. 

The 1947-4$ catalogue, now in press, will bear the new name, as 
will a picture bulletin which is being printed for distribution at 
State and country fairs. 

The August graduating class will receive diplomas bearing the 
new name, Southern Illinois University. 

"This change of name marks the end of an era for Southern and 
the beginning of a new epoch in the institution's history," declared 
University President Chester F. Lay this morning. 



(2) 

"For three score years and ten, Southern served Southern Illinois 
first as a normal school awarding diplomas for two years 1 training, 
then as a full four-year college awarding the bachelor of science 
degree in education. 

"In 1943 » clarifying legislation was enacted by the General Assembl 
confirming the institution's power to offer courses in other fields 
then teacher-education, and since that time the Teachers College Board 
has established four new degrees — the bachelor of arts, the bachelor of 
science, the bachelor of music, and the master of science in education, 

"A College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, a College of Vocations 
and Professions, and a Graduate School have been established in 
addition to the College of Education, and gradually a university 
organization has been built up. 

"In the spring of 1946 Southern was recognized as a University by 
the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, by 
its re-classification on the association's accredited list of 
institutions. It was placed in Group IV, comprised of universities 
having graduate schools. 

"In the fall of 1946, its College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 
was accredited by the Association of American Colleges. 

"Efforts have been made for many years to drop the word ^normal* 
from the institution's name, since that word signifies a two-year 
training program for prospective teachers. Southern has not been a 
'normal school' for many years, and since 1945 it has become a 
university in every sense of the word. 

"So enactment of legislation changing the name to 'Southern 
Illinois University' gives legal recognition to our present functions." 



' ' Southern Illinois 

' ' " Normal University 

Information Service CABBOt " :>ALS ' IL1IWOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■MMHIMHBBHBHMlHHBHHBHHHl 



(3) 

'■•"•■ President Lay expressed on behalf of. students, faculty, alumni 
and other friends of the University, gratitude .to. .Sen *- ~R. G.. r v 
Crisenberry of Murphysboro and Rep. R. J. Branson of Centralia, who 
introduced the four bills changing the name; to members of the General 
Assembly who overwhelmingly approved the change; and to Governor 
Green for signing the measures into lew. 



mm 



v 



^^^^^^^™ 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



» *